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Thanks again Automender - that was indeed the bypass hose - very short compared to the OP's setup. I went out this morning and looked a little more critically. I was able to clamp it off successfully.


The disassembly of the brace/bracket/support was a bit involved but when removed allowed perfect access to the water pump nipple.


I went back and forth several times from side to side and reassembled everything. It takes about 15 minutes for the water to get up to temperature but once there - there was heat!


I have a new degas bottle ordered and plan to do a complete full system flush and cleaning in the spring. This time around I was on a tight timeline and weather wasn't the best.


Again thank you for the info and support.
I hook up my hose to the heater manifold and not to the waterpump end of the hose. It is simpler to undo that end. I also use a hose pinching pliers to crimp that hose and the thermostat end of the heater manifold hose. I installed a brass couple in that hose. I pinch that hose and the water pump hose and I don't lose any antifreeze except that amount that was in the core.

This is the setup I used to inject air to help dislodge crud. This is the crud.
 

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Gentlemen-

The main problem on this subject is FORD's having a casting/materials problem with the VULCAN engine, i.e.excess internal block corrosion leading to a plugged heater core.

The cooling system has to be treated/flushed properly before attempting to either flush or replace the heater core as any corrosion will gather at the lowest point in the system, the heater core. The CLINTON FLUSH PROCEDURE and descriptive posts in this thread are excellent but if the complete system is not treated properly, the heater core will must likely plug again.

Watch this U-TUBE video -
- and others by this FORD tech- FordTechMakuloco
 

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Gentlemen-

The main problem on this subject is FORD's having a casting/materials problem with the VULCAN engine, i.e.excess internal block corrosion leading to a plugged heater core.

The cooling system has to be treated/flushed properly before attempting to either flush or replace the heater core as any corrosion will gather at the lowest point in the system, the heater core. The CLINTON FLUSH PROCEDURE and descriptive posts in this thread are excellent but if the complete system is not treated properly, the heater core will must likely plug again.

The Ford procedure actually calls for removing the freeze plugs and flushing the casting sand out of the block. I used a Peak Super Flush which is an organic cleaner which passivizes the cast iron. When I flushed the core I saved the particles and it seemed more like silicon sand and calcium than rust. Most was non magnetic.
 

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The Ford procedure actually calls for removing the freeze plugs and flushing the casting sand out of the block. I used a Peak Super Flush which is an organic cleaner which passivizes the cast iron. When I flushed the core I saved the particles and it seemed more like silicon sand and calcium than rust. Most was non magnetic.
Correct! But how many will remove the plugs?

Do you guys (board) have a copy of that TSB?
 

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Ok so i went out and took a look at my set up (and did some cleaning under the hood!) and looks like mine is set up a little differently than Old Wagons photos showed. I took some pics, THINK i know what to do but hope someone can chime in and tell me what to do exactly.

So i looked at the passenger side first. I dont have to move the alternator bracket as described in the original post. here is what mine looks like




So the hose on the bottom with the arrow to it is the one that connects to the water pump...this is where i disconnect correct?

That hose runs up to the "T" that is circled above. I believe the hose going left runs to the heater core, and the other hose going 'up' runs to the drivers side.



This is the the drivers side. Again, I dont have to remove any hoses or move the air intake tube at all. I can reach everything pretty easily.

The OTHER "T" you see there is what i need to know what to do with next...here it is up close..





So the hose going "Up" is the one that runs over the the passenger side (in photo one) and the other hose going to the left goes directly into the motor.

So whats confusing me is im dealing with a "T" on BOTH sides and im not sure what to clamp off and what to run the water to lol.

Help/advice anyone?
I have the same set up. Did you ever figure this out?... it's getting cold and I want to flush tomorrow. I'm thinking we just clamp in between the two T's.

Sent from my SM-G935U using Tapatalk
 

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A sometimes easier way than taking the original hoses off the water pump and thermostat is to buy a couple of those $3.99 Prestone flushkits with the tees in them. A simple swipe with a utility knife and a couple of hose clamps later in an easier to access spot of your choice and your connected to the lines. The kit even comes with hose adapters. The nice thing about this is you can flush the core any time you want with only a couple of minutes prep. Of course you will need an extra pair or two of vice grips (in addition to the one on the bypass hose to clamp ofs the heater lines forcing the hose water through the core. Padding the jaws as suggested above is a great idea.
...."connected to the lines"..but then what to do in reality when done? Have then cut the hoses. Mine are glued on, if had lots of play in hoses and could get mine off, great - but I don't n can't! Have been looking at 'Quik hose connectors?' Can leave those in? Can't keep cutting hose to "flush the core anytime you want"!?? [Newbie - thx!]
There's nothing like a Gen 3 heater to clog up by the time cold weather sets in. In the past, I have depended on others to get the heater flushed, but...

After 2 tries by Midas to clear my heater (with a cooling system flush) with LESS heat each time, I decided to try it on my own.

The easiest way to get at the heater fittings is to work with the hoses attached to the engine (water pump on passenger side, engine block on the driver side). You don't risk breaking off the fragile fittings on the firewall that go to the heater.

On the passenger side, it's easy if you take out the top bolt on the generator brace, loosen the other bolt on the brace and swing the brace back.

[attachmentid=22718]

Then with space to access the hose clamp, you now remove the hose from the heater to the water pump.

You then fit a Home Depot hose repair end (about $4) to the heater hose and connect it up to a garden hose leading to your outdoor faucet.

[attachmentid=22719]

On the other side, remove the corrugated rubber air intake (remove one electrical fitting and remove a small hose -- loosen the stainless clamps and move the air intake to the side).

[attachmentid=22720]

Now, with space to access the hose clamp on this side, remove the hose from the engine block.

You then fit another Home Depot hose repair end to the heater hose and connect it to a length of hose to a bucket... or to your driveway. It was freezing when I did mine, and I didn't want to turn my driveway into a skating rink.

Clamp the bypass hose. You lose points if your vise grips are so tight they cut the bypass hose...

[attachmentid=22721]

Turn water on and off at the faucet several times. This cycles the pressure inside the heater core and loosens up crud. If the engine hoses or heater core rupture from city water pressure, it was time to replace them anyway. Then let it run for a while (In my case, long enough to fill the 5-gallon bucket.) Plenty of crud should come out. Empty the bucket.

Repeat until the crud flow has pretty much stopped. At least a cup of particulate and flake crud came out of my heater.

The Clinton Add-on
And now, the Clinton touch, which I discovered purely by accident simply because I wanted to remove as much water from the heater system as possible. Didn't want to dilute the antifreeze, which was brand new from the Midas flushings...

I took the inlet hose off the garden hose and blew into it,

However, after I blew the heater clear of water, it was obvious that a bunch more crud had come loose as a result of the blow... er.. Clinton job. Hooked it back up to the garden hose and the water ran brown with lots of crud.

I repeated the Clinton job four more times - more brown water, more crud. Apparently blowing the heater clear agitates the water inside enough to really clean the pipes out. Purists should note that there was no blue dress or cigar involved in any of this.

After hooking it back up again, replacing the alternator brace, replacing the air intake and its electrical and air connections... so much heat I actually had to turn the heater down. Before this, I never turned my heater down in 2 years.


Forgot to include the overview photo:

[attachmentid=22722]
Thank you soooo much! Looking all summer till got access herein - Yay! finally! Very funny you!
 

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A sometimes easier way than taking the original hoses off the water pump and thermostat is to buy a couple of those $3.99 Prestone flushkits with the tees in them. A simple swipe with a utility knife and a couple of hose clamps later in an easier to access spot of your choice and your connected to the lines. The kit even comes with hose adapters. The nice thing about this is you can flush the core any time you want with only a couple of minutes prep. Of course you will need an extra pair or two of vice grips (in addition to the one on the bypass hose to clamp ofs the heater lines forcing the hose water through the core. Padding the jaws as suggested above is a great idea.
Sounds like it, but (color me dense) but what do you do with your now cut apart hoses? Aren't they pressurized? I've not seen any "after-the-flush" videos/articles that show or explain what to do then. (Even called Peak 800# and the guy said, "It's just like a standard flush." --okaaaay.?) I'd happened to buy one, never opened it and couldn't find receipt for return.
 

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This question may appear to be out of place but I am serious. I have not done heater core flush on any of the cars I owned for last say 20 years. Is it because I lived last 20 years in Florida and didn't use heater long enough to notice the problem? Or because Taurus has a peculiar heater core? I have 3 Tauruses, 2000, 2001 and 2005. Do you suggest I flush at least the 2000 one? Or all?
Well, I'm new at this, have an '02 ohv V6 and don't give a hoot about heat since I'm back in good 'ol Texas and not Boulder anymore. I'm doing Old Wagon's 'Clinton Flush" (awesome instructions, pics and humor!) simply because I want my car to perform well. Can't imagine gunk added to the new hoses, pump and all flowing in - even at nominal amounts. Plus, I'm learning!
Took me 2 separate attempts to remove the glued on Radiator hose to Thermostat!
 

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As a 1997 GL owner without heat for 2+ years(couldn't afford $500 fix), I searched and read alot of guides & suggestions on what to do to get some heat. I had the cooling system drained, filled, flushed, drained & filled again. No heat. Then I read & studied OLDWAGON's "how-to" backflush my heater core. His pictures were GREAT so decided to give it a shot.
I went to Lowes and found everything I needed. I even bought a 6' length of clear tygon for dramatic "crud detection" effect. I followed the pictures to a 'T" and started the procedure. Had my son turn on the water and WOW! The water turned cloudy right away! Then it cleared up. I did the off & on surge technique and MORE cloudy water. After 10 minutes or so I noticed I had forgotten to clamp off the bypass hose(so much for following to a "T"). I rag padded & visegripped the hose (not too tightly), turned on the water and HOTDOG, ever MORE cloudy water! Surged it again several times & stopped.
Hmmm... remembered about the CLINTON "purge" and decided to give it a shot. Disconnected the supply garden hose from the heater return and "self-conciously" purged & flushed until I couldn't get anything cloudy through the tygon connected to the heater core inlet hose. Reinstalled everything, refilled & fired 'er up!
Approx 10 min later the WONDERFUL smell of HEAT permeated my ol' taurus. It was 30 deg outside but I had to turn the heat way down to less than half way. All I can say is thanks to everbody who gave me the courage to try something I had ALOT of self doubts about trying.
NOTHING went wrong, NOTHING leaked and I actually look forward (kinda) to Michigan winter weather (If I don't have to shovel)... '-) I'm really a HAPPY CAMPER!!!!! Thanks Again!! Sorry if too wordy...
B4 I saw Old Wagons' great post, I trolled You Tubes for instructions where found a great on e using clear tubing. Many hours (days?) later, I know more about ID/OD tubes, hoses and pipes structures than any ol gal ought to! But I did buy them along w/some other stuff for a different approach (requiring handling the bypass and plugging - which decided against). Then I realized the 2 hoses and stoppers together cost me more than a brand new entire bypass system! lol But it's 9/2019 and costs are a lot different! Glad you were successful!
 
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