Taurus Car Club of America : Ford Taurus Forum banner

101 - 120 of 151 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
274 Posts
One more for the books. My car has been without heat for about three weeks...finally got around to the Clinton flush yesterday and MANY MANY THANKS!!! Here is a picture of the carnage:


I did have some setbacks (I really hate the hose clamps so I switched them out with the screw type from walmart). I am very thankful for heat B)

Cheers all!
Jordan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Not trying to sound like an idiot or anything, but do i have to drain any fluid before i remove those hoses (prior to flushing)?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Well I just joined the core flush club for my sister in laws '97 GL with Vulcan engine. There was no bypass observed. What I did was to disconnect one heater hose at the engine block connection on the driver side (over the tranny case) and disconnect the other hose at the steel pipe connection on the firewall passenger side. This process isolates the heater core. I connected a short stub spare heater hose (I think 5/8") on the pass side steel connect to mate to the green hose I used. Then on both I pushed a smaller diameter green hose into the heater hoses--see pics. This green hose is the type that HVAC guys use to drain condensate from furnaces and likely use on air conditioning equipment. It makes a nice firm fit into the Taurus heater hose. Since the green hose has a faucet fitting on one end--I was able to connect it to the water supply. I was also able to insert an air hose end into the heater hoses and use compressed air. A number of power water surges expelled heavy amounts of crud and more sour fluid. I then reversed the connections to see that all was right. The car now has heat. I never touched the heater hose tap seen in the picture and may not use it again--as I would just rather use the green hose setup to do any kind of flush job. It was also handy to have an assistant (my wfe) to control the water tap since I was busy gripping both connections to make sure that the connections did not separate. I had no problems and no spills or mess and no core leakage. Being 60 1/2 years old, I still feel up to this stuff!!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Well i'm too now in the club of success stories.

The post above with the picture of the crud in the bucket is about the same as what i got...except i got about 6 bucket fulls..was awful.

This was on a 96' GL. Once i figured what went to what it wasn't too hard. I did accidentally break the coolant sensor while removing the hose on the drivers side, but i didn't nail it..i just barely hit it w/the screwdriver body and it popped right in half. I replaced it and also taped up the bare wires that were touching and all is good. Heat is HOT now...haven't had that in years.

Just as a tip...connect an on/off connector at the end of your garden hose..then you dont have to run back and fourth to the hose bib everytime and you can do it all on your own with no issues :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
another sucess story! i was mad cause when i turned on the water to flush there was like a cup of pink colored coolant and then straight clean water. i figured it didnt work cause i had watched all the videos of black dirty crud coming out. so i get in my car think what to try next and for [email protected] and giggles i tried the heat and it worked!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Good write up. I did this on my 2002 Taurus and it worked great. Based on the flow that I got when I started, my heater core was almost totally blocked. Now it works great and I have lots of heat.

Some comments:
-Use a towel to protect the bypass hose when clamping it (as some others have posted).
-No need to mess around with unbolting the alternator brace (at least on my model with the Vulcan engine), moving the intake out of the way was very helpful though.
-Be careful how much air pressure you apply. I think the cooling system is only rated for 18 psi or so. I tuned down the regulator on my air compressor just to be safe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Hi guys. First post here. I read this entire thread about 5 times before attempting myself.

A little backround. The car is a 2002 Taurus SES. It has 137K miles. We bought it last spring and never really used the heat since, but now it's getting colder and I easily noticed that it doesn't work right at all. Luke warm at best. I knew that once the New England weather really hit, we would have a problem.

Two weeks ago I mentioned it to my mechanic who said it was probably the thermostat. He drained the antifreeze (not flushed) and put in the new Thermostat........ There was no change.


So after reading this thread, thinking about it, looking under the hood 10X, I finally had the guts to attack it.

I bought all the supplies at the local hardware store.

1. I did not have to remove the air intake to get to the hose attached to the engine.

2. I did have to remove the bracket dohickies. I could not get the hose off the water pump without doing so. (couldn't grab the clamp)

3. After hooking up the hose fittings, and turning on the water. (after clamping the bypass hose, see pic), the water filling the 5 gallon bucket was like MUD !! Full of rust. Horrible. It's no wonder any heat came out.

4. Afterward, I refilled the antifreeze (let it all drain out of the heater hose at the engine) and started the engine. I allowed it to warm up and now have much much better heat. Certainly enough to defog a windshield and heat up the car to a comfortable level in cold weather. I don't think it's fully up to par, but it's hard to tell really.

5. So, thanks for all the help guys !!! Can you believe how rusty it was in the heater core !! Amazing. If I'm bored someday, I may try it again, flush back and forth and maybe try some of the "Flush" chemicals to see if it does even more.







 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Drat

Did mine for the 3rd time today since I had to install a new hose and thermostat.This 99 has been in the family since new and the heater hasn't worked in several years. Hasn't been a problem until this year when we were below freezing several times and and damp air fogging up the windshield. I disconnected the heater & by pass hoses and connected to the metal lines to the heater core. Still nice & clear both directions. Did it back & forth 3 times several minutes at a time. Reconnected everything and topped off the system and burped it then put on a new cap. The heater core lines are now warm on both ends! BUT still get cold air out the vents. Guess I know what I'm in store for next.:angry:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
I did mine and I have heat.. Disconnected hose at the pipe fitting on the passenger side, unhooked hose at the block on the drivers.. Squeeze clamps made it fast... Just used the jet setting on a garden hose sprayer. Sprayed both directions alternating an air hose with a rubber air nozzle short bursts till it was clean. Refilled after connecting the hoses and I have heat!!! Works great, awesome right up, thanks Iowa gets cold!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
There's nothing like a Gen 3 heater to clog up by the time cold weather sets in. In the past, I have depended on others to get the heater flushed, but...

After 2 tries by Midas to clear my heater (with a cooling system flush) with LESS heat each time, I decided to try it on my own.

The easiest way to get at the heater fittings is to work with the hoses attached to the engine (water pump on passenger side, engine block on the driver side). You don't risk breaking off the fragile fittings on the firewall that go to the heater.

On the passenger side, it's easy if you take out the top bolt on the generator brace, loosen the other bolt on the brace and swing the brace back.

[attachmentid=22718]

Then with space to access the hose clamp, you now remove the hose from the heater to the water pump.

You then fit a Home Depot hose repair end (about $4) to the heater hose and connect it up to a garden hose leading to your outdoor faucet.

[attachmentid=22719]

On the other side, remove the corrugated rubber air intake (remove one electrical fitting and remove a small hose -- loosen the stainless clamps and move the air intake to the side).

[attachmentid=22720]

Now, with space to access the hose clamp on this side, remove the hose from the engine block.

You then fit another Home Depot hose repair end to the heater hose and connect it to a length of hose to a bucket... or to your driveway. It was freezing when I did mine, and I didn't want to turn my driveway into a skating rink.

Clamp the bypass hose. You lose points if your vise grips are so tight they cut the bypass hose...

[attachmentid=22721]

Turn water on and off at the faucet several times. This cycles the pressure inside the heater core and loosens up crud. If the engine hoses or heater core rupture from city water pressure, it was time to replace them anyway. Then let it run for a while (In my case, long enough to fill the 5-gallon bucket.) Plenty of crud should come out. Empty the bucket.

Repeat until the crud flow has pretty much stopped. At least a cup of particulate and flake crud came out of my heater.

The Clinton Add-on
And now, the Clinton touch, which I discovered purely by accident simply because I wanted to remove as much water from the heater system as possible. Didn't want to dilute the antifreeze, which was brand new from the Midas flushings...

I took the inlet hose off the garden hose and blew into it,

However, after I blew the heater clear of water, it was obvious that a bunch more crud had come loose as a result of the blow... er.. Clinton job. Hooked it back up to the garden hose and the water ran brown with lots of crud.

I repeated the Clinton job four more times - more brown water, more crud. Apparently blowing the heater clear agitates the water inside enough to really clean the pipes out. Purists should note that there was no blue dress or cigar involved in any of this.

After hooking it back up again, replacing the alternator brace, replacing the air intake and its electrical and air connections... so much heat I actually had to turn the heater down. Before this, I never turned my heater down in 2 years.


Forgot to include the overview photo:

[attachmentid=22722]
I too live in Boston, Mass area. Nice write-up! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Have 2001 Sable with Vulcan. Bought it used about 6 months ago - only 80,000 miles on it but it was obvious the coolant had been neglected for a LONG time. Had all the hoses replaced and coolant flushed - but six months later - no heat.

Did the flush per the OP now have lots of heat! That made my day.

Thanks! Thanks! Thanks!
Have had to repeat the process a couple times in the last couple year, each time with longer lasting success. Also, have flushed and drained entire cooling system at the same time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
New to the forum. Add another to the successful heater core flushes! Thanks to all of you for your suggestions and tips.

Daughter's car that has lived in Texas for 13 years before going off to college with her in Nebraska this fall. That's a crappy place to be when you can't defrost your windshield or get any heat. Came home for Thanksgiving and I gave it a flush. Great heat now! Again, thanks to everyone here who's contributed to this topic!

I do notice that the temperature fluctuates with the engine rpm. High rpms = higher air temperature. Idle rpms = cooler air temperatures. If I restrict the flow through the bypass hose by some small clamp would that help get more flow through the heater core and less through the bypass hose? Or is this going to cause some other problem?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,641 Posts
New to the forum. Add another to the successful heater core flushes! Thanks to all of you for your suggestions and tips.

Daughter's car that has lived in Texas for 13 years before going off to college with her in Nebraska this fall. That's a crappy place to be when you can't defrost your windshield or get any heat. Came home for Thanksgiving and I gave it a flush. Great heat now! Again, thanks to everyone here who's contributed to this topic!

I do notice that the temperature fluctuates with the engine rpm. High rpms = higher air temperature. Idle rpms = cooler air temperatures. If I restrict the flow through the bypass hose by some small clamp would that help get more flow through the heater core and less through the bypass hose? Or is this going to cause some other problem?
Yes you can reduce the flow by clamping off the bypass a little but don't go to far because the bypass is needed to establish flow when the thermostat is not open yet. I use a regular screw type hose clamp and tighten it a little at a time. The bypass will be restricted but you will not be able to close it off completely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Clinton heater flush

Add one more. I just finished the flush. I pinched off the bypass with a small pair of long nose vise grips after I'd covered the teeth with two small pieces of rubber hose. I didn't think they clamped hard enough because all I got was clean clear water so I ran up to harbor freight and bought a three pack of line clamps. I ended up using the larger pair of the three. I started getting little pieces of what looked like rust flakes so I flushed it both ways several times and used my air compressor. Ultimately there wasn't a lot of gunk to come out but there was apparently enough in it to clog it up. So for $11.00 and a little time I now have heat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
341 Posts
Just wish to add a NOTE for those doing heater core flush / Clinton flush.

I did the flush last year, before winter, and rust particles came out.
Good. Sufficient heat returned.

Did not do flush this fall - seemed ok. But soon, in winter, had reduced heat.

Not quite enough for defrosting and de icing here in winter - and not coming quickly enough / very slow to bring heat into the car.
Temp guage showing engine is hot - but not enough heat yet inside car. What is wrong? I said to myself ... so ...

So I did a Mid Winter heater core flush again - during a warm spell in early January here.

Flush - but came out clean.

So again - I added 1/3 CLR (Calcium Lime Rust remover product) and 2/3 hot water to make up about 2 litres / 2 Quarts of solution.

First make sure you ISOLATE the heater core system.
So you don't get CLR and Water into the rest of the cooling system - engine block / rad / etc.

1. Flush with some Cold hose water - comes out mostly clean.

2. Introduce the 1/3 CLR and 2/3 Hot Water solution. Let sit for about 15 minutes max.

3. Flush out again with cold hose water.

[ Slowly at first, and retain the first 3 litres or so of CLR + water solution that comes out - save/label in a 4 litre empty windsheild washer plastic container for next year - stuff still mostly good. Can be used again. ]

4. Flush a little more with cold hose water to ensure all cleared out.

5. Fill again with 50/50 Antifreeze and Distilled Water - till you see green coming out the other end.

Zip it up / close it all up again / connect all hoses again as before and remove all clamp offs / isolations.

Run system.

PRESTO - ABRA CADABRA - SHAZAMM ! Full and abundant heat again.

That CLR solution and 15 min is just enough to scour out and clean up a heater core - to give full heat again.

Probably helps dissolve some stuck on rust and scale and crud - and get the flow and heat transfer in the heater core going again.

Enjoy - happy flushing - happy heating - happy defrosting.

Happy New Year.

[ I think this will have to be an annual event for me - In the Fall / before winter each year. ]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
There's nothing like a Gen 3 heater to clog up by the time cold weather sets in. In the past, I have depended on others to get the heater flushed, but...
[...]
After hooking it back up again, replacing the alternator brace, replacing the air intake and its electrical and air connections... so much heat I actually had to turn the heater down. Before this, I never turned my heater down in 2 years.
I did my first flush on my 2002 SES with 3.0 Vulcan. The before temperature of the air at the floor vents was 98. The after temperature is 148.

I removed the passenger side hose at the firewall, not at the other end of the hose at the water pump. As discussed elsewhere in this thread. That worked well for me.

My only complaint is that the hose to the thermostat housing was not ¾ inch, as advertised. It was definitely smaller, probably 5/8. As a result, I did not have the proper extra hose or connectors to direct the flush discharge over the fender, nor could I forward flush. I just directed the detached hose downward onto the transmission.

I'll be better prepared if I ever need to repeat the procedure.

I want to say thanks to the OP (even though he is no longer logging in) and that in general this is one one of the best and most help forums I have ever had the pleasure to read and be a part of. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Just did this to my 06 Taurus and it went from cool air to blazing hot! Thanks for the write up. I did need a 3/4" connection for the water pump hose and a 5/8" for the thermostat hose.
 
101 - 120 of 151 Posts
Top