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Hi,

This method works great, to save time if you are in a very cold climate
or want a faster way thy this:

do not remove the hose at the water pump, instead follow it up towards
the firewall, just to the left of the computer harness you will find the hose
connects to the metal pipe that feeds the heater core.

disconnect the hose at this point, it is higher up and you will loose less
coolant.

Next step is the same as described in this thread.

I got a garden hose sprayer that has hose threads on the end,
I attached one of those plastic quick disconnects (in hose dept at home depot)
and it fits the short hose that feeds the other end of the heater core metal pipe.

I use low pressure on the garden hose to pulse the heater core clear,
then move back to the passenger side and use a short 8" length of
hose to mate to the metal pipe and my quick connect slips into this hose.

I did the flush multiple times from each side, if it flowed clear, I changed
sides and more junk flowed back out. took about an hour.

nice to have heat after two years without!

now if I can figure out why my outside air never shuts off I'll be all set !

regards

James
 

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QUOTE (james27613 @ Feb 11 2009, 12:44 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=701169
Hi,

This method works great, to save time if you are in a very cold climate
or want a faster way thy this:

do not remove the hose at the water pump, instead follow it up towards
the firewall, just to the left of the computer harness you will find the hose
connects to the metal pipe that feeds the heater core.

disconnect the hose at this point, it is higher up and you will loose less
coolant.

Next step is the same as described in this thread.

I got a garden hose sprayer that has hose threads on the end,
I attached one of those plastic quick disconnects (in hose dept at home depot)
and it fits the short hose that feeds the other end of the heater core metal pipe.

I use low pressure on the garden hose to pulse the heater core clear,
then move back to the passenger side and use a short 8" length of
hose to mate to the metal pipe and my quick connect slips into this hose.

I did the flush multiple times from each side, if it flowed clear, I changed
sides and more junk flowed back out. took about an hour.

nice to have heat after two years without!

now if I can figure out why my outside air never shuts off I'll be all set !

regards

James[/b]
Maybe the little door actuators that open and close when you switch the system between recirculate/fresh air are broken?

I also agree with you about using the hose higher up on the line. It's a beautiful day out here today so I went outside and looked into what I would need to do this job... I found that there is 4 advantages to doing it the way you describe, and not as this thread did... First, like you said, you'll loose less coolant. Secondly, on my car the hose that connects to the water pump is clamped on with those tension clips. They are REALLY hard to release because they leave an impression in the hose that makes it hard to remove... Thirdly, on my car, there are the screw down type collars that hold the hoses onto the metal elbow in the place you described by the computer harness. Ford must have wanted people/their mechanics to access the coolant system in this place because they used the screw down type. Also, the hoses aren't bolted down to the frame/engine here so there is alot more play with the hose.

The fourth, and most important, reason to connect to the coolant system here is that you don't have to worry about the bypass line. The area we are describing is after the bypass line and not before it, like it is with the water pump hose. You won't have to worry about vice griping the bypass line or mixing the tap water in with the rest of the coolant in the system because the bypass isn't completely shut off. I lost alot of sleep worrying about the bypass line opening up and allowing the garden hose water to circulate through the rest of the system. In essence, you are bypassing the bypass line so you don't have to worry about anything like that. The only piece you will flush out is the heater core!

Also, I'm concerned about coolant loss when I attempt this. Someone mentioned removing the top coolant hose from the degas tank and letting the water pump pump out some of the coolant into a jug first. Should I use this method to remove some of the coolant, and if I do, which hose do I remove? There is one on both ends of the tank, one at the front of the tank that goes to the radiator and another one at the back that goes up and over the UIM and disappears into the engine. I took off the cap to try to see which side of the tank the coolant was spitting out from but it was too hard to tell...

Last question, how do you remove the hose from the metal T where the bypass/heater core/engine hoses all meet up? I want to disconnect the heater core hose from the T so I can hook that directly up to the garden hose... The clip that holds the hose onto the T is nothing like the other tension clips though. It is a very small and narrow metal clip, like the kind of thing you have to destroy with a screw driver to release... Any ideas?
 

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It's a crimped clamp band and you will have to cut the aluminum band off to get the rubber hose off the pipe. Sounds like a good time to buy bulk hose and some good worm clamps to just replace the hose. Or if you are careful you can cut through the aluminum and save the hose.
 

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QUOTE (rheckber @ Jan 29 2008, 01:45 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=587587
A sometimes easier way than taking the original hoses off the water pump and thermostat is to buy a couple of those $3.99 Prestone flushkits with the tees in them. A simple swipe with a utility knife and a couple of hose clamps later in an easier to access spot of your choice and your connected to the lines. The kit even comes with hose adapters. The nice thing about this is you can flush the core any time you want with only a couple of minutes prep. Of course you will need an extra pair or two of vice grips (in addition to the one on the bypass hose to clamp ofs the heater lines forcing the hose water through the core. Padding the jaws as suggested above is a great idea.[/b]
I used a couple of small rubber padded wood clamps on my hoses, worked like a charm and doesn't put too much pressure on the hoses. Plus had it's own built in padding!
 

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QUOTE (rheckber @ Jan 29 2008, 01:45 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=587587
A sometimes easier way than taking the original hoses off the water pump and thermostat is to buy a couple of those $3.99 Prestone flushkits with the tees in them. A simple swipe with a utility knife and a couple of hose clamps later in an easier to access spot of your choice and your connected to the lines. The kit even comes with hose adapters. The nice thing about this is you can flush the core any time you want with only a couple of minutes prep. Of course you will need an extra pair or two of vice grips (in addition to the one on the bypass hose to clamp ofs the heater lines forcing the hose water through the core. Padding the jaws as suggested above is a great idea.[/b]
Since I already have one kit installed from a previous flush, All I need is a second to go in the line to the pump. Gonna give this idea a shot!

Also, if you got needlenose type vise grips, you can make a "padded" pair by simply taking some old hose and putting them over the clamp on the grips.
 

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I did this a couple of days ago and it worked like a charm! I have had my sable wagon for about a month; it seems that the previous owners flushed it out before because there was a tee in the water pump hose already. Very easy and worth it.
 

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Well I finally sucked it up and did this little procedure... I didn't do like the OP said and used the hoses next to the firewall that go in/come out of the heater core. I disconnected the rubber hoses from the metal elbows by undoing the "snake" collars and using a slotted screw driver to pry the hose apart from the elbow (10 years of being tightly latched together meant they were almost glued shut).

Anyways, I used the hose repair pieces, hooked up a garden hose and cycled the water off and on. I blew into the hose too and I'm not really sure that did anything... Just to be safe, I reversed the flow of the water and then blew into it again to make sure I got everything out!

After driving around for maybe 20 minutes, I turned on the heater and almost died of heat stroke! I don't think I've EVER felt as much heat from my car before.

Here's some pics of the garbage that came out of my core!




I took my digital meat thermometer to test the temperature... Before I did the flush, the highest reading I could get was about 120 on low speed... After the flush, I now got a reading of 160 on high speed and a blistering 175 on low speed!

I hate to say this, but I can't wait till winter!
 

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i need to flush mine out
i also needed to reread this thread to remind myself NOT to use muriatic acid in the core
just water and possibly some compressed air
i mixed my global yellow stuff coolant 50/50 last year and it got slushy when it was really cold
what mix are you NE guys running?
im thinking about trying 75% coolant this year
 

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this was a great tutorial, thanks a million
btw the clinton thing makes you sound like one of the guys that is mad because clinton was getting it for free and they had to pay!!
keep up the good work, cheers!
 

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QUOTE (-James @ Sep 23 2009, 02:43 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=755165
i need to flush mine out
i also needed to reread this thread to remind myself NOT to use muriatic acid in the core
just water and possibly some compressed air
i mixed my global yellow stuff coolant 50/50 last year and it got slushy when it was really cold
what mix are you NE guys running?
im thinking about trying 75% coolant this year[/b]
I use the premixed stuff and never had any problems.

You really don't need anymore than residential water pressure to clean out the core.
 

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im thinking of trying a flush before changing out the heater core. about the bypass hose, if i put a valve to restrict (or shut off) the bypass, will it help by letting more or hotter coolant through the core? i dont know which generation taurus i have, i need to research that. it is a '93 gl sedan. has 125K on it. i bought it 7 years ago with 25K orininal miles on it for 2,500. last winter towrds the end i experianced less heater output. ive put in a new thermostat and 3 years ago it got a rebuilt water pump. engine temperature seems normal and the hoses are hot going to and from the heater core, there seems to be a temp difference on inlet vs outlet, just going by feel, i dont have a digital pyrometer. whish i did. i will try the flush thing and hope. i just wondered about the bypass hose and if restricing or shutting it off would be beneficial.
 

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Dude this is awesome Thanks! What a great site you guys saved me tons of time and trouble. The advice on the heater core and the advice I got on rear strut replcements was great keep up the great posts. Pictures are awesome!








QUOTE (OldWagon @ Nov 25 2007, 05:14 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=563821
There's nothing like a Gen 3 heater to clog up by the time cold weather sets in. In the past, I have depended on others to get the heater flushed, but...

After 2 tries by Midas to clear my heater (with a cooling system flush) with LESS heat each time, I decided to try it on my own.

The easiest way to get at the heater fittings is to work with the hoses attached to the engine (water pump on passenger side, engine block on the driver side). You don't risk breaking off the fragile fittings on the firewall that go to the heater.

On the passenger side, it's easy if you take out the top bolt on the generator brace, loosen the other bolt on the brace and swing the brace back.

[attachmentid=22718]

Then with space to access the hose clamp, you now remove the hose from the heater to the water pump.

You then fit a Home Depot hose repair end (about $4) to the heater hose and connect it up to a garden hose leading to your outdoor faucet.

[attachmentid=22719]

On the other side, remove the corrugated rubber air intake (remove one electrical fitting and remove a small hose -- loosen the stainless clamps and move the air intake to the side).

[attachmentid=22720]

Now, with space to access the hose clamp on this side, remove the hose from the engine block.

You then fit another Home Depot hose repair end to the heater hose and connect it to a length of hose to a bucket... or to your driveway. It was freezing when I did mine, and I didn't want to turn my driveway into a skating rink.

Clamp the bypass hose. You lose points if your vise grips are so tight they cut the bypass hose...

[attachmentid=22721]

Turn water on and off at the faucet several times. This cycles the pressure inside the heater core and loosens up crud. If the engine hoses or heater core rupture from city water pressure, it was time to replace them anyway. Then let it run for a while (In my case, long enough to fill the 5-gallon bucket.) Plenty of crud should come out. Empty the bucket.

Repeat until the crud flow has pretty much stopped. At least a cup of particulate and flake crud came out of my heater.

The Clinton Add-on
And now, the Clinton touch, which I discovered purely by accident simply because I wanted to remove as much water from the heater system as possible. Didn't want to dilute the antifreeze, which was brand new from the Midas flushings...

I took the inlet hose off the garden hose and blew into it,

However, after I blew the heater clear of water, it was obvious that a bunch more crud had come loose as a result of the blow... er.. Clinton job. Hooked it back up to the garden hose and the water ran brown with lots of crud.

I repeated the Clinton job four more times - more brown water, more crud. Apparently blowing the heater clear agitates the water inside enough to really clean the pipes out. Purists should note that there was no blue dress or cigar involved in any of this.

After hooking it back up again, replacing the alternator brace, replacing the air intake and its electrical and air connections... so much heat I actually had to turn the heater down. Before this, I never turned my heater down in 2 years.


Forgot to include the overview photo:

[attachmentid=22722][/b]
 

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well, no luck with the flush, its free-flowing but i still have limited heat. i can only see the one vaccum motor, it appears to work correctly. i do miss the days of mechanical cables opening doors rather than this stupid setup with vaccum. at least i know its not a clogged core. bought 10' of heater hose, cut it in half and attached each end to the core hookups, poured in some liquid pluber and let set for 15 min, hooked up the garden hose and ran water through into a 5 gallon bucket, no debris, seemed to flow freely, swithced hoses, same result. may put a vavle on the factory bypass line so i can shut it off or at least restrict it and see what happens.
 

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If the heater core flows good then check the hoses for temperature when the car is running and hot. If the output hose is as hot or nearly as hot as the input then it may be the vacuum motor.

But it may be the pump too being worn?
 

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the inlet to the core is hot, almost too much to keep hold of, the outlet is hot also but not as hot as the inlet. i would think if my pump was going bad again, id have a engine overheat problem. ive changed the thermostat hoping the engine would run a little warmer and give me more heater output. it may be a little better since the flush, but its still not what it used to be. 50 degress out, and ive still got the fan on high. used to the heat would about run you out of the car. not now.
 

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QUOTE (Qwertz9586 @ Jan 30 2008, 09:19 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=588103
I think you'd be fine if you change your coolant every couple of years.[/b]
Yes maintaining your cooling system will save you a lot of headaches. I concur. I do a flush every 33K miles with the green Motorcraft premium antifreeze. When I hear "brown-stuff" or "rust" is being seen as a result of the flush then it appears some one lacked to take care of the cooling system. Rust will clog your heater core, radiator and may cause further overheating. Depending where you live a radiator that is 10% clogged will cause your car to overheat, assuming an OEM radiator.

Loved the read about the "Clinton Add-On" flush. Sometimes you have to think outside the box to "getter done."

Monsoon
 

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I am planning on doing this, as car is barely able to even de-fog.

Can someone please provide me the
1. Pics of hose to dic-connect on drivers's side.
2. Pics of by-pass hose
3. Pics of the firewall hose at passenger side.

I know its a dumb request, but I am actually dumb with cars.

Kindly help !!
 

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Wow! Just finished the Generation III flush and what a difference! Heat! HOT heat, and plenty of it!!! My thanks to you for posting this and sharing your knowledge.
 
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