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Hi, my 2004 Taurus is leaking coolant pretty bad, we've changed out the water pump and also the hose, and it's still leaking? What could it be? Plz help!
 

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What engine? Duratec or Vulcan? The cooling systems are completely different between the 2 engines.

If Vulcan, timing cover leaks are fairly common.

Didnt you locate the actual source of the leak before going thru the hassle of replacing the water pump?
 
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What engine? Duratec or Vulcan? The cooling systems are completely different between the 2 engines.

If Vulcan, timing cover leaks are fairly common.

Didnt you locate the actual source of the leak before going thru the hassle of replacing the water pump?
Yes, we even had a mechanic say it was the water pump and then he said it was the hose. And it's still leaking and I'm sure what engine it is exactly.
 

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+1 on what Jeff K said. I have Vulcans in both my daily drivers (Ranger, Taurus). I just replaced the water pump in my Taurus. I replaced the timing cover gaskets in both when I did the water pumps. And as a precaution, I replaced the freeze plugs in both heads (it was just easier with everything removed). Now I'm not saying this to make you feel worse (on the contrary), but I think your mechanic should have put dye in the cooling system before starting the repairs.
 

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I'm not sure what engine it is.
If it looks like the engine pictured at this link Engines | Taurus/Sable Encyclopedia, then it's the Vulcan.

If it looks like the engine pictured at this link Engines | Taurus/Sable Encyclopedia, then it's the Duratec.

NOTE: The 8th digit of your VIN will also tell you which engine you have. VIN codes for the two engines, can be found at the links above. VIN can be found on a sticker (easiest place to find it) inside the Drivers' door. On my '95, it's on the side of the door that faces the "B" pillar (the one between the front and rear doors).
 

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Sounds like you need to find a different mechanic who actually knows how to troubleshoot problems and not throw random parts at the car hoping to fix it.
 

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An easy way to find a sneaky coolant leak is to add a bottle of UV dye to the coolant and after a short run to get it up to temp use a black light to find the glowing leak. UV dye kits are cheap and most auto parts stores have them.
 

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Yeah, I basically said a very long winded version of what Hornswaggle and Jeff K said. Kudos to them for getting straight to the point! Lol
 

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Discussion Starter #12
If it looks like the engine pictured at this link Engines | Taurus/Sable Encyclopedia, then it's the Vulcan.

If it looks like the engine pictured at this link Engines | Taurus/Sable Encyclopedia, then it's the Duratec.

NOTE: The 8th digit of your VIN will also tell you which engine you have. VIN codes for the two engines, can be found at the links above. VIN can be found on a sticker (easiest place to find it) inside the Drivers' door. On my '95, it's on the side of the door that faces the "B" pillar (the one between the front and rear doors).
Theres a hole in the lower intake manifold. If I pay someone to fix that, what are possible things a mechanic will run into that will also need to be fixed?
 

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What you're being told sounds not quite right, can you post a pic, a vid or a link to a vid of the leak?
 

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Intake manifold gasket leak probably more likely than a "hole". Makes a lot more sense, IMO
 

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Theres a hole in the lower intake manifold , if I pay to get that fixed, what are possible things a mechanic might run into, that will also need to be fixed?
What other things are possible that a mechanic might run into that also need to be fixed? Good question. Whenever a system in a car, especially an older one, has a problem, it is prudent and wise to have the entire SYSTEM evaluated. In the case of a cooling system, this includes radiator,water pump, the coolant itself, thermostat, various hoses,cooling fans,etc. Making piecemeal repairs to an aging cooling system is a fool's errand, often when one leak or fault is repaired, another may occur, as all of the parts/pieces are under pressure and have the same # of miles and heat cycles. In your case, at the very least, whatever parts are disturbed to repair the current leak need to be considered, and/or those parts that are prone to failure that are now accessible with the intake manifold removed.A thorough evaluation of the entire cooling system by a well qualified, TRUSTED shop is the best advice that I can give.
 

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+1 on what Jeff K said. I have Vulcans in both my daily drivers (Ranger, Taurus). I just replaced the water pump in my Taurus. I replaced the timing cover gaskets in both when I did the water pumps. And as a precaution, I replaced the freeze plugs in both heads (it was just easier with everything removed). Now I'm not saying this to make you feel worse (on the contrary), but I think your mechanic should have put dye in the cooling system before starting the repairs.
How did you get to the firewall side freeze plugs on the taurus without removing the exhaust manifolds (if thats what you did)?
 

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Sorry it took a bit to get back to you, soundu! I only had to replace the ones at the front of the heads at the time. I'd definitely look at the #2 cylinder bank (front of car) and check to see if you can get to them first. If yes, then very likely you can do the rear without removing the manifold. At that point, I'd jack the rear of the engine up slightly (undoing motor/trans mount) being careful to use a block of wood under the pans. Basically, rotate the engine slightly forward for a bit more room.
 
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