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Ok so if you read my previous thread ----> http://www.taurusclub.com/forum/82-maintenance-repair/166746-lets-play-game-diagnose-my-car.html

I obviously have a big problem here.

But honestly $50 for a piece of cardboard and then like $800 to have it put in?

Why is it so expensive. My brother is pretty smart with cars i mean, he usually googles but he has never had a problem fixing anything in my taurus.

So the ford dealership said like $800, but how difficult is it to do this by yourself? I mean if you do it right what are all of the consequences?

Would it be cheaper to buy a used motor and have it put in?

Should i just junk the car? The taurus is a nice car and don't get me wrong i like the space and i'd love to keep her running but i need a vehicle.

So what would you do in this situation? What should i do?

Thank you SOOO much for the input and all ideas will be considered.
 

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Well if you can replace the car for 850 bucks then yes, get rid of it. All things concidered it sounds like a pretty good deal for a complete head gasket job from a Ford dealer.

Make sure if you do have it fixed that you keep up on your coolant flushes (every 2 years or 30K) and you shouldn't have a problem after that. Head gaskets are a common failure but it is usually traceable to poor cooling system maintenance.

Just FYI you can "google repair" a lot of things, it's not a job for the non-mechanically inclined though.
 

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there is a lot of labor involved. you can do it yourself if you have tools and basic mechanical skills. a digital camera, painters tape, sharpie, sandwich bags and a card board box helps make sure things go back together the proper way. a good machine shop can deck the head for you. do both sides if you do tackle the job.
first time doing a gasket may take you 14+ hrs. maybe longer if you dont have an air compressor or stubborn nuts and bolts
 

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But honestly $50 for a piece of cardboard and then like $800 to have it put in?
Why is it so expensive.
Because it takes 8 hours by the book to put it in. Shop around for labor rates less than 100$ an hour.
Or do it yourself.

I bet that was something else at the beginning, that you just ignored (besided the fact that you treated it with cheap fixes like the garbage that you poured in) and that lead to the actual situation.
 

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same with a Heater Core $50, but you have to tear apart the entire dash and can cost over $1000
 

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Ok so if you read my previous thread ----> http://www.taurusclub.com/forum/82-maintenance-repair/166746-lets-play-game-diagnose-my-car.html

I obviously have a big problem here.

But honestly $50 for a piece of cardboard and then like $800 to have it put in?

Why is it so expensive. My brother is pretty smart with cars i mean, he usually googles but he has never had a problem fixing anything in my taurus.

So the ford dealership said like $800, but how difficult is it to do this by yourself? I mean if you do it right what are all of the consequences?

Would it be cheaper to buy a used motor and have it put in?

Should i just junk the car? The taurus is a nice car and don't get me wrong i like the space and i'd love to keep her running but i need a vehicle.

So what would you do in this situation? What should i do?

Thank you SOOO much for the input and all ideas will be considered.
because it a lot more than just the head gasket. pull off heads, take them
to machine shop. Have them decked and valves done. there is a couple
hundred if your lucky enough not to have a cracked head. and you forgot
new oil, filter, antifreeze, spark plugs, and anything else you broke on the
way in or out. if your lucky the cats were not trashed by the antifreeze
going through them. you don't even want to know what they cost
Dont forget the head bolts....
 

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take a chance on this **** >>> https://secure.steelseal.com/index.php/t2?mboxSession=1319728370264-42873


I just ordered a bottle not cheap 24 oz $90 plus shipping and tax. I posted my problem >>> http://www.taurusclub.com/forum/82-maintenance-repair/166737-coolant-leak.html and 00greenlx, a poster here posted about "Steel Seal" I've done lots of research since (another link) >>> eBay.co.uk Guides - Steel Seal Head Gasket Fix even checked the better business bureau on them; good rating. 7 complaints over 3 years, 4 of which were remedied. >>> Steel Seal Review - AUTO PARTS & SUPPLIES-NEW in Doylestown, PA - BBB Business Review - BBB serving Metro Washington, DC and Eastern Pennsylvania

You know at this cost and being a simple do it yourself treatment, that supposedly lasts as well as a permanent mechanical fix; why not give it a shot. Worse case scenario is you do the labour expensive mechanical repair, if Steel Seal fails to fix the leak.
 

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Lar, that is terrible advise. So you are basically saying that it can't hurt. It most certainly car. if it works, you still have a car with a blown head gasket. It might temporarily stop leaking, but think about it, if a highly torqued cast iron head and a graphite gasket will steel reinforced edges cannot stop the leak, what makes anyone think a few metallic particles are gonna do anything for any real length of time.

Coolant will continue to leak past the blockage, and can get into the oil. It can cause bearing failure, which is more costly than fixing the head gasket problem. Coolant can continue to leak past the blockage and get into the cylinders, and in turn into the exhaust. You catalytic converters are expensive, so you can risk those. You have a radiator and heater core, both of which have passages which can be plugged by small metal particles floating around in the coolant.

So on the contrary, rather than having little to risk, you risk have a blown head gasket, and a number of problem which can be caused by ill attempts at a snake oil repair. Trust me, a blown head gasket is cheaper to repair than a blown head gasket and a plugged heater core.

To the OP, look you have two choices. So far you have not maintained the car properly and it is having issues as a result. Blown head gaskets are almost always the result of improper maintenance. Not accusing you or anyone else, just stating a fact.

A properly maintained car will last longer and have fewer expensive issues than a car that was not.

Fixing the car right will allow you to keep the car running in tip top shape, and it will allow you to get the full use out of your investment.

So you have a choice, either keep giving this car the care it has gotten so far, it will have no value, and it will not last very long, or do it right, and the car will keep running, and you won;t have to find another, and you might be able to sell your existing one for more if you do decide to get something else.

For what its worth, you say you can get another car for $850. Do you really think an $850 car is gonna be in better condition than the one you have now, particularly one that has been pulled apart and had its gaskets replaced? I can almost guarantee you than a car that you spent $800 in repairs on will be a better buy than a car that is going for that same amount on the market. They are selling it so cheap because it has pending problems. To be realistic, you are unlikely to get a reliable car that does not need some kind of repair up front for under $3,000. If you shop around carefully, you can sometimes find steals or auction cars for a little less than that. But almost all cares under $3000 on todays market are high mileage and in need of repair in the near future.

To replace a head gasket yourself, you need a few days. If doing it over a weekend, you may need two weekends.

Basically you MUST have the head at least checked, all most all cases of blown head gasket have at least some head warpage. To correct this, the head must be resurface, which restores it to a true flat condition. If it is not flat, the new gasket will not seal, and you will have a problem as bad or worse than what you already have.

You need to replace all the head bolts, the original bolts are torque to yield design and are not reusable.

You will need a good torque wrench, head bolts and intake bolts much be torqued in a certain sequence to certain amounts. You can't do this by feel, you must use precise tools to measure the amount of torque you are applying. You will likely need two wrenches, a larger one for your head bolts, and a smaller one for your intake. The reason is torque wrenches have specific ranges where they are accurate and effective. The smaller bolts on the intake are likely torque in in-lbs instead of ft-lbs, and that means a smaller wrench that is accurate in the in-lb ranges.

In all probability, there are other cooling system parts that need to be replaced and the system will need to be flushed. While this does not require special tools, it is an added expense. Also in reality, you cannot just replace a $50 head gasket. You are going to disturb several other gaskets to tear into the motor that far, and many of those gaskets are going to require replacement as well. So in reality, you need a head gasket kit, which is going to include all the gaskets to that point.

My point is many of these are included in the cost of having someone else doing it for you. $800 for a head gasket replacement is not bad, particularly if that is for both sides, which it really should be. They will flush everything, torque to the proper specs, clean up as they go, do the machine work, etc.

If you do it yourself, you will save money, but not as much as you might think, especially if you don't already have all the needed tools. Factor all required tools, materials, and manuals into your cost.
 

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http://www.taurusclub.com/forum/28289-khantyranitar.htmlto Khan Tyranitar
I see you didn't read up on the product I was suggesting; why not do some research on Steel Seal before chiming in with an opinion on it. The links are in my post. BTW there is NO particles in it, it is a chemical reaction that hardens like steel at all points of leakage. Read the directions testimonials and guarantee. Hey if it works that is all that really matters. The poster is looking for a cheap fix and this just may be it.
 

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Lar,
I have read your post and in every car forum I subscribe to and read, (Jeep, Neon, Honda) if there is a head gasket problem, someone like you comes in suggesting (advertising is closer) this 'Steel Seal' product.
And every post just happens to have the link available too. Not just the product name or suggesting a website, the actual link!

Too much of a coincidence for me, but then I have been called a skeptic.

I have suggested to others products of vendors, but I don't supply the link for Felpro gaskets or Spectra radiators. They can Google that. Testimonials on a company website, let me guess, all wonderful?

I understand how they (your product) work by creating a clog at the exit point, and maybe they could work fine for a heater core or radiator (14-16 PSI), but a long term solution for a combustion chamber at 175+ PSI working within the extreme cold from a winter to the heat from summer and just operating in the engine temperatures?

Such a great product, while don't the manufacturers lower the build standard and pump this through on the production line?

Have a good day, I'm going to start collecting these from the different forums. I want to see if this is boiler-plate language or is it tweaked for each car model.
 

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Lar,
I have read your post and in every car forum I subscribe too and read, (Jeep, Neon, Honda) if there is a head gasket problem, someone like you comes in suggesting (advertising is closer) this 'Steel Seal' product.
And every post just happens to have the link available too. Not just the product name or suggesting a website, the actual link!

Too much of a coincidence for me, but them I have been called a skeptic.

I have suggested to others products of vendors, but I don't supply the link for Felpro gaskets or Spectra radiators, they can Google that. Testimonials on a company website, let me guess, all wonderful? I understand how they work by creating a clog at the exit point, and maybe the would work fine for a heater core or radiator (14-16 PSI) a long term solution of a combustion chamber and 175PSI+ and the extreme cold from winter to the heat from summer and just operating in the engine?
Such a great product, while don't the manufactors lower the build standard and pump this through on the product line?

Have a good day, I'm going to start collecting these from the different forums. I want to see if this is boiler-plate language or is it tweak for each car model.
:lol2: I thought i was the only one who noticed the link. these stop leak products are not to fix a leak. they are intended for use when you are stranded on the side of the road and have no choice. Just like fix a flat. it allows you to get to a repair station/dealer/home. However AVOID using them if you can. a clog in a cylinder cooling port is not a good thing. If you live by these products and think they cause no harm then i got a bridge in new york for sale. :D
 

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Lar, that is terrible advise.
Before you go any further, this is being taken out of context, this is a TEMPORARY FIX that contains no particles in it that would cause plugging of passages in the cooling system. DO NOT concider it a PERMANENT fix.

Thank you :)
 

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For what its worth, you say you can get another car for $850. Do you really think an $850 car is gonna be in better condition than the one you have now, particularly one that has been pulled apart and had its gaskets replaced? I can almost guarantee you than a car that you spent $800 in repairs on will be a better buy than a car that is going for that same amount on the market. They are selling it so cheap because it has pending problems. To be realistic, you are unlikely to get a reliable car that does not need some kind of repair up front for under $3,000.
I agree with that philosophy. I have often kept and fixed cars that were "beyond economic repair" because they weren't beyond economic repair to *me* when I knew their entire history.

I wonder if there's a way to get the labor done more cheaply by hiring an individual (a student or semi-hobbyist) rather than going to a shop. If you can find one you trust, of course.
 

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Before you go any further, this is being taken out of context, this is a TEMPORARY FIX that contains no particles in it that would cause plugging of passages in the cooling system. DO NOT concider it a PERMANENT fix.

Thank you :)
Anything designed to harden should NOT be put into any type of cooling system, EVER. EVER.

Cheap fixes almost always come with with a consequence which is a higher repair bill when the original problem gets exaggerated because you suddenly though your $50 bottle of "Steel Seal" was a magical cure and you drove on your broken engine for another 1,000 miles.

Get a repair manual, a good wrench set, a felpro gasket kit (which includes all the gaskets from the heads up, including valve seals) and fix it yourself.

At least then you'll learn something.
 

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He did try twice the cheap fixes. With the present result.
 

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So what would you do in this situation?
If the car is one I wanted to keep I would fix it myself with a pair of heads. Rebuild heads for a Vulcan are $200/pair with warranty. Head gasket set and new bolts run around $100. I would also do a water pump and O2 sensors while I had it apart. The 3.0 is a simple engine and fairly easy to work on.
I ordered a head for my escort from these guys last year and couldn't have been more pleased:
REBUILT 3.0 FORD V-6 CYLINDER HEADS RANGER TAURUS VANS | eBay
 

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Anything designed to harden should NOT be put into any type of cooling system, EVER. EVER.

Cheap fixes almost always come with with a consequence which is a higher repair bill when the original problem gets exaggerated because you suddenly though your $50 bottle of "Steel Seal" was a magical cure and you drove on your broken engine for another 1,000 miles.

Get a repair manual, a good wrench set, a felpro gasket kit (which includes all the gaskets from the heads up, including valve seals) and fix it yourself.

At least then you'll learn something.
I'm not saying I would use it, I have the tools to do the job correctly and the knowlege BUT in a pinch or if the car was on its "Last leg" I would use it to get a few more miles out of the car till I got a new one. The use of any of these "Stop leak" solutions are for vehicles that are at the end of their lives. Though it won't state that on the bottle ;) If you can do a front timing cover head gaskets aren't much more work IMO.
 

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There is no perminant fix from a can........... done. If you are going to fix it, fix it right THE FIRST TIME and do as the manufacturer did........ put in a new head gasket. They didnt put a gasket in there for nothing......

This kind of reminds me when Cadilliac had a BIG problem with their head gaskets and GM's "fix" was some organic pills that you put into the radiator to seal the gasket. All that did is buy them time till the drivetrain warranty would run out and the consumer would have to pay out of pocket to repair it.
 

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Lar,
I have read your post and in every car forum I subscribe to and read, (Jeep, Neon, Honda) if there is a head gasket problem, someone like you comes in suggesting (advertising is closer) this 'Steel Seal' product.
And every post just happens to have the link available too. Not just the product name or suggesting a website, the actual link!

Too much of a coincidence for me, but then I have been called a skeptic.

I have suggested to others products of vendors, but I don't supply the link for Felpro gaskets or Spectra radiators. They can Google that. Testimonials on a company website, let me guess, all wonderful?

I understand how they (your product) work by creating a clog at the exit point, and maybe they could work fine for a heater core or radiator (14-16 PSI), but a long term solution for a combustion chamber at 175+ PSI working within the extreme cold from a winter to the heat from summer and just operating in the engine temperatures?

Such a great product, while don't the manufacturers lower the build standard and pump this through on the production line?

Have a good day, I'm going to start collecting these from the different forums. I want to see if this is boiler-plate language or is it tweaked for each car model.
Tgrudzin, I don't work for nor sell Steel Seal. The leak is more than the guy he can't afford to fix via a mechanical repair. If you really want to be helpful why don't you give him the money to fix it.
 
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