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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Would like to monitor the temp of my AXOD tranny. Does anyone know what temp kit will work and where to put the sensor?

I saw the sticky for the AX4N but did not see one for AXOD.

Thanks

Adam
 

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If there is not already a plug you can take out, then in the pan would be the next best location. You can put them in the lines too, though I don't think they give the most accurate readings of the actual transmission temp, just a momentary fluid temp. The fluid can temporarily get hot, but thats ok so long as the trans as whole does not heat up, and the fluid cools back down before it gets to the trans.
 

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If there is not already a plug you can take out, then in the pan would be the next best location. You can put them in the lines too, though I don't think they give the most accurate readings of the actual transmission temp, just a momentary fluid temp. The fluid can temporarily get hot, but thats ok so long as the trans as whole does not heat up, and the fluid cools back down before it gets to the trans.
True, but any time the fluid exceeds 175 Deg F or so it starts breaking down. If you can keep the trans outlet(highest) down the fluid will last longer.
 

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True, but any time the fluid exceeds 175 Deg F or so it starts breaking down. If you can keep the trans outlet(highest) down the fluid will last longer.
Yes, but good luck keeping the torque converter from spiking temperatures at or beyond that point. The torque converter achieves torque multiplication at the expense of heat. So long as the cooler is doing its job, the temperature would only exceed that point for a very brief time. You don't want or need to know the temperature of the fluid in the line, you want to know if the fluid as a whole is staying in its normal range.

Personally, unless I was towing, I don't want to know or care about what the actual fluid temperature is. Just run a good cooler, change your fluid on a regular basis, and you are set. Besides, regardless of how hot the fluid does or does not get has almost no effect on how long it lasts. The fluid lasts until it reaches saturation with friction material, and that is a function of wear, not heat.

Its just like these people I see wasting money on synthetic fluid for their trans. Yes the fluid can withstand higher heat, but the fluid is still only good for about 30,000 miles at the most before it reaches saturation. The better fluid does not significantly affect the wear on the friction surfaces. The better fluid will protect the seals and bearings better, but even then, those parts often only fail because they are exposed to excessive friction material, which is like sandblasting those parts.

So long as the fluid can hold the friction material in suspension, it effectively neutralizes it. But as the levels increase, wear increases, and the particles cannot be neutralized once they exceed saturation, and the fine grit will start settling on parts and grinding away at any rubber or metal part that it comes in contact with, especially where parts come in close contact.
 

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Well said! I'll go with that. I don't want a temp gage either. I modified my cooling fans to come on based on trans temp, and added an aux cooler. I tested it and trust it to work so I don't have to monitor it.
 

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From my experience I got almost 200K miles on my original tranny only by using the best synthetic fluids I can find and changing the fluid around 33K mile intervals. However, I plan on extending the fluid intervals to 66K miles with a transmission oil cooler and synthetic fluids, seems to be working so far.

I'm not sure what "reaches saturation" means, previous post.

My Theory....
Most everything in nature oxidizes. Oil is no exception. Oxidizing is a chemical change or process at the molecular level. An example of this is rust on metal or looking at red rocks (Sedona, AZ). You are seeing rust because the metal/rocks are oxidizing.

What appears to happen is when the fluid gets really hot it starts to oxidize. It looses it chemical property to lubricate and loss in viscosity. Keeping this oxidize oil in the transmission will make the transmission inoperable sooner rather than later. Synthetics handle heat better than non-synthetics. What are you going to use for tranny fluid? You can pay now or pay me a lot latter with a tranny overhaul.

Think about this...if using a synthetic fluid and we could keep the tranny fluid at say 110F how long could you use the fluid before changing it? May be the life the engine-transmission?

Keeping the oil cooler (transmission cooler) not only extends the life of the oil but the economic life of the transmission. And aides in keeping the engine coolant a bit cooler as well.

Monsoon
Keeper Kool.... :)
 

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Ok, so perhaps I wasn't clear on some things. Let me explain the saturation I mentioned and the primary cause of transmission wear. In the transmission are bands and clutches that engage each other to transfer motion from one part of the transmission to another. The clutches in an automatic transmission work just like the clutches in a manual transmission. As the friction surfaces make contact, there is always a moment where the speeds of the two surfaces are different, which results in some slippage until the surfaces speeds are synchronized. The fluid to some extent lubricates the surfaces as this occurs, reducing wear, but some friction material always breaks down and wears off. This friction material has to be carried away by the fluid, otherwise it would simply build up and prevent solid engagement. The fluid is designed to hold a certain amount of this material in suspension preventing it from collecting somewhere else in the transmission where it could cause damage. But the fluid can only hold so much of this material in suspension before it becomes saturated, just as there is a limit to how much salt you can have dissolved in water at any given time.

This friction material in the fluid is made of very small particles, most of it will pass right through a transmission filter. As a result, the only way to remove this build up of material if to replace the old fluid. This saturation point is reached in roughly 30,000 miles under most conditions, regardless of whether the fluid is a synthetic or not. Synthetic fluid can withstand greater heat (the trans should not be exposed to this anyway, the seals don't like it) and has better lubriscosity, which is great for the bearings and other moving parts, unless the oil is saturated with friction material, in which case it becomes more like a polishing compound.

So the limiting factor in a transmission is heat and the buildup of friction material. Both conventional and synthetic fluids are excellent at protecting the moving parts, both are highly engineered to have specific amounts of certain friction modifiers, detergents, and other stuff they put in there and the oils themselves will outlast the 30,000 mile interval if it were not for the buildup of material.

So not to argue, but many can get 200,000 mile or more out of the original trans regardless of the fluid if it is replaced at the proper intervals. I think at that point, the synthetic transmission fluid is more of a feelgood thing than any actual results.

I do prefer synthetic in my engine, I only run group IV stuff in my engines. I also run extended oil change intervals. Why do I feel differently amount this in my crankcase? There are no friction surfaces in the engine. The requirements are very different. With the proper oil, the right filters, and the proper maintenance schedule, you can run well beyond 10,000 miles between oil changes in an engine. Even so, you will not leave the fluid in the engine nearly as long as you would trans fluid.
 

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Ok, so perhaps I wasn't clear on some things. Let me explain the saturation I mentioned and the primary cause of transmission wear. In the transmission are bands and clutches that engage each other to transfer motion from one part of the transmission to another. The clutches in an automatic transmission work just like the clutches in a manual transmission. As the friction surfaces make contact, there is always a moment where the speeds of the two surfaces are different, which results in some slippage until the surfaces speeds are synchronized. The fluid to some extent lubricates the surfaces as this occurs, reducing wear, but some friction material always breaks down and wears off. This friction material has to be carried away by the fluid, otherwise it would simply build up and prevent solid engagement. The fluid is designed to hold a certain amount of this material in suspension preventing it from collecting somewhere else in the transmission where it could cause damage. But the fluid can only hold so much of this material in suspension before it becomes saturated, just as there is a limit to how much salt you can have dissolved in water at any given time.

This friction material in the fluid is made of very small particles, most of it will pass right through a transmission filter. As a result, the only way to remove this build up of material if to replace the old fluid. This saturation point is reached in roughly 30,000 miles under most conditions, regardless of whether the fluid is a synthetic or not. Synthetic fluid can withstand greater heat (the trans should not be exposed to this anyway, the seals don't like it) and has better lubriscosity, which is great for the bearings and other moving parts, unless the oil is saturated with friction material, in which case it becomes more like a polishing compound.

So the limiting factor in a transmission is heat and the buildup of friction material. Both conventional and synthetic fluids are excellent at protecting the moving parts, both are highly engineered to have specific amounts of certain friction modifiers, detergents, and other stuff they put in there and the oils themselves will outlast the 30,000 mile interval if it were not for the buildup of material.

So not to argue, but many can get 200,000 mile or more out of the original trans regardless of the fluid if it is replaced at the proper intervals. I think at that point, the synthetic transmission fluid is more of a feelgood thing than any actual results.

I do prefer synthetic in my engine, I only run group IV stuff in my engines. I also run extended oil change intervals. Why do I feel differently amount this in my crankcase? There are no friction surfaces in the engine. The requirements are very different. With the proper oil, the right filters, and the proper maintenance schedule, you can run well beyond 10,000 miles between oil changes in an engine. Even so, you will not leave the fluid in the engine nearly as long as you would trans fluid.

So part of my difference in feelings? I could run conventional oil in my engine for 5,000 miles, or I can run a good top quality full synthetic for 20,000 miles. Since the fluid does not cost 4 times as much, it saves me money, while still protecting my engine better. But with the transmission, the fluid change intervals are about the same either way, but one costs a lot more will little benefit to show.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hi, thanks very much!

Unfortunately I am unable to see the attachments. It could be because I am in Japan and the internet connection here is odd. I will check it when I get back to state side!

Adam :)

There is a plug on top of the valve body just like on the AX4N. BUT they are opposites between the two. On each one is high pressure (Line) one is control pressure (EPC). Use the control pressure one.

Here are the AX4N locations



Here are the AX4S locations.



You need an 1/8" NPT thread.
 
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