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Discussion Starter #1
So a large storm blew in at the end of my shift, and I hoped to outrun the leading edge. The car hit a low spot, the storm drains stopped up, and so did the car.

I took it all the way down, and piston 1 has seen better times.

All of the cylinders will be cleaned and honed of the surface rust, and every piston will be carefully inspected for damage. I intend on going to a parts yard, and stripping an engine of the #1 piston, or the first good one I find, whichever happens. Does anyone see a problem with this? The car has 253,000 miles, and I really don't want to buy new parts.
 

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Is a used engine not cost effective where you live? I guess if the car was pretty worn out at those miles and I wanted to experiment to see I could get some more miles out of it I might. What else got water in it?
 

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So a large storm blew in at the end of my shift, and I hoped to outrun the leading edge. The car hit a low spot, the storm drains stopped up, and so did the car.

I took it all the way down, and piston 1 has seen better times.

All of the cylinders will be cleaned and honed of the surface rust, and every piston will be carefully inspected for damage. I intend on going to a parts yard, and stripping an engine of the #1 piston, or the first good one I find, whichever happens. Does anyone see a problem with this? The car has 253,000 miles, and I really don't want to buy new parts.
With that much hydrolock damage, the crank might be damaged, that is twisted out of index. Has happened.

-chart-
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The problem isn't cost, it is effort. As stated, the car has seen a lot: would it be worth it to swap engines? Most likely not. This car is also a flex fuel, which only compounds the problems of swapping.

Is a twisted crank a common problem? The car was at less than 2k rpms, and every spark plug showed a massive lean condition. I looked at the crank, and I couldn't see any problems (take that as you want). I figured I get a 100-150k engine and pull the piston out of it, would I need anything else? Is the problem potentially that severe? When I unbolted the #1 piston, the rest of the engine turned very easily. (I removed the pistons to clean the rust).
 

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I would assume to get to this point you've already pulled the engine? You're talking about effort but it would seem you've already put a lot of effort into saving the engine vs transplanting a used working motor.
 

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Are exhaust valves also rusty/pitted where they seat?
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
The engine is still in the car, I do not need to remove it to get this far. The problem with swapping engines is that the car is too modern for me. The computer uses serials to identify certain sensors, and if the plug is loose, or the sensor is wrong, I won't know until it is all back together, and then I must tear it down. The effort would be significantly lower if I just mutilate a donor car, and piece this one back together. The parts in question are purely mechanical: the computer will not know or care if there is a change.

No, the valve seats are not shiny, but I do not see any pitting or scoring, why do you ask? Would the intense heat change cause the exhaust valves to spall?
 

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Just some consideration. If you pulled the pistons from the bottom you may need a ridge cutter to break the ridge on the upper part of the cylinder. Also the diameter of the donor car cylinder may be a different size compared to yours and the rings may not fit well. Your compression and oil control may be not what it is supposed to be. Might consider using a cylinder home to help seat the different rings.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Pistons were driven out the top. I know the engine is a 3.0 OHV engine, the pistons would be identical; the excess cost in building special pistons every year would defeat the "economy car" aspect of the Taurus. That and researching pistons on ebay show identical parts all the way back to a '91 Ranger, I am reasonably sure they will cross. The cylinder honing will be done: I got to get the rust out, or it will destroy the internals.

Kinda like sandpaper, but more destructive.

I know matching the piston ring wear will be difficult, but I believe that it would be more even than putting in a pistons' worth of new rings in a well broken in engine. Would reringing the engine be best? I have been led to believe the core engine is almost bulletproof for over 300,000miles; I personally doubt it would make a difference.

Should I play it safe, and take a crankshaft as well? What is involved in pulling a pistonless crank?
 

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I asked about the valves because the motor sounds like it had enough water in it to rust the cylinder walls.

On my 88 Taurus I pulled the motor apart similar to where you are at in frame at like 40k miles because it had piston slap. One piston had a skirt that was improperly machined from the factory and with a little time it would rock in the bore. I replaced that one single piston honed and re-ringed and that motor was still rolling down the road 90k later. On a side note, Ford actually paid for the parts I bought and installed after I wrote the letter and shipped them the piston. I had a lot of respect for that way back then.

That all being said, I think the replacement of the single piston, hone re-ring and put it back together was the right decision for that problem. My best estimate in your case is that unless this is just an experiment to see if the car will go a tad longer that putting in a motor that has not been hydrolocked and is in good shape is the better decision. For the amount of work you will go through pulling a second motor apart in a junk yard, plus all the work to get this one back together it would be way more effective to swap motors.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I remember my dad taking a taurus apart to replace the torque converter(different car), and it took him several days, and a special built frame, just to take it apart. We do not even have the jack to lower it out of the car anymore. I agree that it would be more effective to swap engines, but the car has 253,000 miles on it, the cost in tools and parts would undoubtedly total it, probably before I even touch a mounting bolt. The company I'm working for has a truck they are disposing of that I hope to buy. the increased gas usage is not appealing, but this car is approaching the end for me; I am mainly doing this to keep the car going another month or so, and then I will aim to sell it. I believe the crankshaft is fine(apparently removing the crankshaft is an undocumented affair) I'll just get a piston, and see if I can purchase a single piston of rings.
 

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If I were going to only keep it one more month, there is no way I would go through the trouble of fixing it at all. I would send it down the line and start over with the truck you are looking at. You are going to put way more time and effort than you will get back doing that fix.
The other issue, is that I would think there will be way more gremlins in that engine than just a bent rod, and you won't be happy with the outcome of this project. Cold water hitting a hot engine could cause freeze plug issues, things getting warped, there is a multitude of things there.

The other consideration is that the car has 253K on it. Do you really want to put more time and money in a car that has no real value left in it if it were fixed?
If you are sure you want to fix it, I would swap engines before I would throw a different piston into a worn engine, that has been swamped.
 
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