Taurus Car Club of America : Ford Taurus Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I came across this site and forum a few days ago, and found a knowledgable community of owners of the Taurus/Sable. The information and advice was quite helpful, and motivated me to add a post of my own regarding my problems with my '99 Duratec.

My car has 109K miles on it, and had all the symptoms of a electronic problem (sensor, or other). A stop by AutoZone to take advantage of their free offer to be tested by a code reader, which confirmed a bad IAC (idle air control) valve, and lean running operation was reported at the O2 sensors. I was pleased to be able to access the entire list of codes on this fine site to learn that "lean" was associated with a vacuum leak. I could not find it at first, but considering that I needed to replace my spark plugs and wires (never had), I hoped to be able to locate the leak in time.

I had start-up idle speeds that varied considerably, but would range from 2500 to 2800 rpm at times, and yes, even on a cold engine. Scarey! I replaced the IAC valve, but had little to no difference in operation, in fact it seemed to be worse at rare times. No ignition miss on cold engine, nor on warm engine coming right off the highway, but left-foot braking was required at most stoplights in town. Engine would suddenly try to die, RPM's fluctuating wildly, and succeeded in dying several times. Some said that I might need a new throttle position sensor, or possibly a new PCM (powertrain control module).

Back to the tale, I went to the Ford parts store and bought the gaskets for the EGR valve and the aluminum Upper Air Intake Manifold (`$23 for all). Yes, I absolutely had to remove the EGR valve and the UAI manifold to reach the back three spark plugs. It is not that difficult. Once done, the back plugs were easily accessible. While so much equipment was out of the way, I discovered the PCV valve perched in a hiding spot under the throttle body. Upon removing it, and the hose connected to the top fitting of the PCV valve, I was surprised to find a gaping hole in the back side of the large vacuum line. The hole was not visible from another angle. I knew I had located my problem. While the original hose was molded, I replaced it with a longer length piece of high quality bulk braided (reinforced) vacuum hose, and do not expect any problems.

End of the story; problems solved. The plugs were ready to be replaced (used new Autolite platinum), and I replaced the wires too as I did not want to get back in there any time soon (~$32). The car now starts, idles and runs perfectly, runs very strong in fact, and I only await the MIL (Check Engine Soon light) to go out on its own.

Does anyone know if Ford MIL goes out on its own like GM idiot lights do? Seems to me (back when I used to sell them new at a Ford dealer) that they should after a certain number of successful restarts without incident. Otherwise I'll have to pay someone to turn it off <_< . I have probably started it 10+ times so far, and no lights out yet.

I hope one of you knows the answer. Thanks!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,415 Posts
If the light doesn't go out on it's own, you don't have to pay anybody to turn it off. You just have to disconnect your battery for 5 or 10 minutes.

And when you reconnect the battery and start it up, some people say you should "set the idle". Try to use as many accesories as you can; put the car in gear (holding the brakes of course), turn the headlights on, turn the radio on, turn the a/c on max, and turn the steering wheel back and forth.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,277 Posts
I beleive Ford and GM both use the OBD system....
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
569 Posts
Here was my PCV hose vacuum leak, it caused a lean condition on both of my banks: Did it look anything like this?

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Since you both have the same type of hole, is the hose rubbing against something to create this? Hose in pic looks as if it was punctured. Checking mine tomorrow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
You know, I can't say something didn't rub against my hose, however the main issue was how soft and gooey the rubber material had become in that localized area! The rest of the hose was firm, like partially dryed-out rubber. Reflecting back, I seriously doubt anything was rubbing it, but I'll have to take another look to see for sure.

Based on these two samples, I would say this is a pattern we all have to keep a watch on. Remember, my car is a '99 with 109K on it, so time and mileage will be a significant factor. Replace yours before this happens, as it is too easy to replace to allow a hole to fully form in the hose.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top