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Ok, so my rear brake light/turn signal bulb burned out the other day, I went into Autozone and was gonna get the original style bulb, but I noticed LED brake lights. A little more expensive, but they would last a lot longer. So I splurged and bought the LED brake lights. Had no problems installing them since they fit the same harness. They worked when I tested them out, but I noticed that when I put the turn signal on it flashes real fast. Like what it does to tell you, you have a bulb burned out. So I looked at the front and rear, nothing is burned out. Long story short, why would the LED lights make the signal flash faster? Do I need a different flasher in the fuse box? I really don't want to go back to normal bulbs now seeing how much brighter they are.
 

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Its the LED's.... they don't draw as much power as the regular filament type bulb so that makes the flasher flash faster.... Just like a bulb is out. :lol:
 

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LEDs take a lot less voltage than a standard halogen bulb. I think the lamp out sensor detects how much voltage is "left over" to see if the bulb is indeed working and using power. The LED probably uses too little power for the sensor to think it's a real bulb in there.

Well actually, I have no idea, but I DID stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ok guys, I kinda figured that LED's take less power than regular bulbs, that's why I bought them. But I need help on how to fix the faster flashing problem. The dipsticks that work at Autozone and Murry's have no clue on what to do. But why would they, it's just the same people that work at any other part time job, why should you have to know anything about cars. Sometimes I think I know more than the people that work there, but in this case I don't. So I need help. I'm not going to buy regular bulbs after spending 17 bucks on the LED lights.
 

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the faster tick means the bulbs out? ::smacks head:: now you tell me!

well, to fix your problem, (its not easy, but deal with it.)

the voltage drop is pretty much dependant on the total resistance. find out what the normal resistance of the filament bulb is, find out the resistance of the leds. (multimeter or look it up) pick up a resistor thats the diff between the two, and wire it in one way or another. voila, problem fixed. that, or ignore the fing thing! the lighst still blink, dont they?
 

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Originally posted by leakingpen@Jun 9 2004, 12:19 AM
the faster tick means the bulbs out?  ::smacks head::  now you tell me!

well, to fix your problem, (its not easy, but deal with it.)

the voltage drop is pretty much dependant on the total resistance.  find out what the normal resistance of the filament bulb is, find out the resistance of the leds.  (multimeter or look it up)  pick up a resistor thats the diff between the two, and wire it in one way or another.  voila, problem fixed.  that, or ignore the fing thing!  the lighst still blink, dont they?
You do have to keep in mind that you may need a larger (watt) resistor to handle the heat if you do decide to do it. It may lower the light output though...... I've never modified my turn signals so I can't be certian. Hopefully someone will chime in and help out. Good thing you were the guinea pig though, I was considering getting some LED stop light bulbs.... :lol:

*EDIT* Oh yeah, WELCOME TO THE CLUB LEAKINGPEN! :banana:
 

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Your blinker fluid is low. Click here to order some now.


Seriously, could you try an electronic flasher? Just a suggestion, I don't know if it would work, maybe someone else does?
 

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leakingpen is correct. use a resistor. the lights will be dimmer, though.

If you want to build your own blinker, use a 555 timer, a 20mF capacitor, and various resistors. You can find information on how to wire it on the web. Just go to Google, and type in 555 timer.

Another option is to build your own LED lights. I am currently in the process of doing this to my car. I an going to use ~20 LEDs for each light, so there will be plenty of current draw.
 

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Jeez guys, talk about using a sledge hammer to kill a fly.
Go back to the auto parts store and get an ELECTRONIC flasher. Install it and be done with it.
There is no sensor that tells the flasher to go faster if a bulb's out. It's the load that tells the flasher how fast to go. The lighter the load, the less the filament in the flasher heats up, the less it stays open. An electronic flasher uses timers intead of a bi-metal strip. So it doesn't really care what the load is (unless you try hooking a 100w halogen up to it I think, LOL).
A big selling point of LED bulbs is the fact that they run much cooler and use much less energy than an incandescent bulb. Why defeat that purpose by putting some power-robbing, heat-generating hunk of ceramic in your tailight housing?
 

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who said there was a sensor? And how is an electronic flasher a better option thatn a $1.00 resistor? And since when is a tiny incandescant bulb a huge power draw on a car's electrical system?

EDIT: spelling. The keyboard at works SUCKS!!!
 

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I think the lamp out sensor detects how much voltage is "left over" to see if the bulb is indeed working and using power
Majisto did.

An electronic flasher is better for the reasons I already stated, less power draw, and cooler running.
Multiply 1 "tiny" incandescant bulb's draw by how many you replace with LED's and there's your huge power draw.
Let's take taillights for example. Say you have 21w incandescants. 21/12=1.75 amps of power being used by that bulb when running at night. I found a site that states 1157 LED replacements draw 144ma each. Less than a tenth of the power used. If you replace taillights, running lights, side marker lights and turn signals with LED's, you're reducing the load of the electrical system by a significant amount. Less load on the system means a cooler running alternator, better performance (seriously), and fuel mileage.
By using a $1.00 resistor, the only gain you're achieving is the "kool" factor. Otherwise, you're adding a load to the electrical system, cutting wires to add kludge fixes, and depreciating the value of the mod in the process, IMO.
I'm not trying to argue with anyone, it's just the advice given so far, to me, is not well thought out.
I'll give you props though Silvapain. Your idea to build a flasher with a 555 timer is a good one, but why go through the trouble to build it your self, when it's sitting on the shelf at a FLAPS waiting to be plugged in?
 

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ah, I guess I must have missed that line about a flasher "sensor". I apologise.

I would build a timer myself because I an an engineering student with free access to 555 timers, resistors, capacitors, and the equipment necessary to build it. I guess it's not feasible for everyone.

The more that I think about it, an electronic flasher would be best. If you were ever to sell the vehicle, and the next owner wanted incandescents, the resistor would mess up the system.
 

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thanks. just bought (well, will buy this morning, or tommorow, dang loan hoops) a 96 wagon, after getting in a wreck and totalling my 96 escort wagon (not my fault!)
moving on up!
/threadjack

okay, i had no idea that the point behind leds was a lower drain, i though it was higher brightness, and the bi metal strip... like a christmas light flasher bulb... your kidding? i had no idea current blinkers were that OLD technology wise. da, get an elecronic flasher.


btw, did ya'll know that the led lights are pretty much invisible on night vision and ir scopes? i just find that interesting.
 
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