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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anybody ever installed a turbine into their Taurus, like say a 1994 Taurus?

EDIT: I mean Turbocharger! Sorry!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Agh! Yes a turbocharger, hehehe. But the jet engine looks fabulous! I'm laughing really hard right now, thank you for starting my day off right. Obviously I have some terminology problems when it comes to engine work.

I'm asking because I'm thinking of taking mechanics courses at Fayetteville tech, to learn more about my engine. And I have this ongoing joke with my father about turbocharging my Taurus. He's moving to Indianapolis soon, he said if I can do that maybe we can take the Taurus to the speedway, hehehe. And I would seriously not mind making some phone calls to see if I could do that. Then I could come back here and be like, yep yep, just ran the Indy 500 in my turbocharged Taurus.

So I was curious if anyone else in the forums had turbocharged their Taurus.

Plus if I take mechanics courses maybe I can be a more contributing member here and not just Miss Asks-a-lot all the time. But woohoo jet engine! And no more getting tail-gated! Yea!
 

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QUOTE (kismetmiss @ Jun 3 2010, 07:49 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=808918
Agh! Yes a turbocharger, hehehe. But the jet engine looks fabulous! I'm laughing really hard right now, thank you for starting my day off right. Obviously I have some terminology problems when it comes to engine work.

I'm asking because I'm thinking of taking mechanics courses at Fayetteville tech, to learn more about my engine. And I have this ongoing joke with my father about turbocharging my Taurus. He's moving to Indianapolis soon, he said if I can do that maybe we can take the Taurus to the speedway, hehehe. And I would seriously not mind making some phone calls to see if I could do that. Then I could come back here and be like, yep yep, just ran the Indy 500 in my turbocharged Taurus.

So I was curious if anyone else in the forums had turbocharged their Taurus.

Plus if I take mechanics courses maybe I can be a more contributing member here and not just Miss Asks-a-lot all the time. But woohoo jet engine! And no more getting tail-gated! Yea![/b]
It has been done, but not successfully. There were tuning issues and boost issues. The ranger guys with vulcans supercharge them regularly. 5-7 lbs boost is most, I think, because the head gaskets like to blow out ~8. If you got steel head gaskets, I still wouldn't go above 8, because I don't know how long those pistons or the crankshaft will hang in there. Tom Morana makes a 3.3 stroker kit out of forged components for ~$2000 that'll hold up to 20 lbs boost. There was a probe that successfully turbo'd his vulcan.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Og1mjP2oLVs&NR=1

I don't know the details on his build, but with enough money and dedication, it can be done.
 

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The problem is most of these guys try to run turbos on the stock compression. To successfully run a turbo reliably you need to lower the compression ration from around 9:1 down to about 7:1 The easiest way to do that reliably is to use a shorter connecting rod, and/or a different crankshaft.

It can be done, you just have to understand what is involved to make it work. It does require internal engine modifications to make a reliable setup.

The Morana kits will hold up, but expect to sink some money into the project.

If you aren't going to upgrade the internals, you need to limit the boost to about 5 lbs or so.

If you do it properly you can get as much as 30 lbs of boost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks guys!

I still have much to learn about engines. Most of my research has been related to autobody work so far, but I'm shifting gears towards engines now. Especially if I am able to take the mechanics classes on engine work, it's nice to know the turbocharging is a realistic option. Education and saving money is necessary of course. I checked out the youtube link, so now I know a vulcan can be turbocharged. I have to learn more about boost and the modifications it takes to turbocharge the engine without hurting the various parts.

1994 Ford Taurus: Pimp My Ride
 

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QUOTE (KhanTyranitar @ Jun 3 2010, 08:11 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=808922
The problem is most of these guys try to run turbos on the stock compression. To successfully run a turbo reliably you need to lower the compression ration from around 9:1 down to about 7:1 The easiest way to do that reliably is to use a shorter connecting rod, and/or a different crankshaft.

It can be done, you just have to understand what is involved to make it work. It does require internal engine modifications to make a reliable setup.

The Morana kits will hold up, but expect to sink some money into the project.

If you aren't going to upgrade the internals, you need to limit the boost to about 5 lbs or so.

If you do it properly you can get as much as 30 lbs of boost.[/b]
The Morana kit is only good to 20.

QUOTE
Why is low compression better for a Turbocharged Engine?
You make horsepower by how much air you move through the motor. A high compression 10:1 engine is more efficient than a 7:1 engine, so the 10:1 engine gives you more bang for the buck. However, because the lower compression is not as efficient, it will move more air through it. So, at 15 PSI of boost, the 7:1 engine will have an effective compression ratio of 14:1, will not be into detonation, and be moving more air, making more horsepower than the same conditions for the 10:1 engine. That engine will be in self-destruct mode, have detonation, and an effective compression ratio of 20:1!

This is why the racers only run 5:1 or even 6:1. All of this is great for a drag car, but because the static compression is lower, you will not have much bottom end torque either. So, since most of us don't drag race every place we go, a good compromise would be 8:1 or 8.5:1 compression. This way you don't loose too much bottom end for driveability, and if you don't run too much boost, say 10 to 15 PSI, you stay away from the gray effective compression area of 15:1 and up.

Remember, that the shape of the combustion area, cam, type of fuel, etc. all play a part of when the engine starts to detonate. It comes down to start with low boost, and sneak it up from there until you run into problems.[/b]
Boost is measured by the increase over standard pressure at sea level (~14.7 psi). So 1 pound boost would be pushing about 15.7 psi into your cylinders. That's why the 15 pound boost number effectively doubles your compression ratio. So mathematically, divide your boost level by 14.7, add 1, and multiply that by your stock compression to get your new compression. I think 10.x:1 was the safe limit for 91 octane, so let's say 10. Stock compression is 9.3:1, so working backwards, [10/9.3 -1] x 14.7 = 1.1 psi. You can run 1 psi without any tunes. There're gas stations around me that pump 94 octane, I don't know what's around you, but running 5 psi will net you 12.5:1 compression ratio. That should hold up safely with an appropriate tune to retard timing, and copper plugs. Contact SHOZ123 about an SCT tune if you're serious about this. 14:1 compression is 7.5 psi boost. An improperly build 14:1 street engine will ping like a mofo, so you can see how complicated this gets really fast. The Saleen S7 twin turbo runs 5.5 psi on 11.0:1 static compression, so it doesn't need to be 7:1, you just need to do your homework before you design your system.
 

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QUOTE (Palach @ Jun 3 2010, 09:58 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=808927
The Morana kit is only good to 20.[/b]
The Morana kit also runs stock length or longer strokes. This limits the peak. But I will stand corrected. If you could get a shorter stroke than stock, you could run up to 30 lbs, but you would probably need to have the rods custom made. to pull that off. So for parts you can buy off the shelf and use, I guess the realistic limit would be 20 lbs. You also would not be able to run pump gas at that point.
 

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QUOTE (KhanTyranitar @ Jun 3 2010, 09:06 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=808932
QUOTE (Palach @ Jun 3 2010, 09:58 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=808927
The Morana kit is only good to 20.[/b]
The Morana kit also runs stock length or longer strokes. This limits the peak. But I will stand corrected. If you could get a shorter stroke than stock, you could run up to 30 lbs, but you would probably need to have the rods custom made. to pull that off. So for parts you can buy off the shelf and use, I guess the realistic limit would be 20 lbs. You also would not be able to run pump gas at that point.
[/b][/quote]

+1

Anything over 10 psi, you'd need to buy your gas from the track. Actually, stroking a motor is a result of moving the rod journals away from the center of the crank, so while it's lower than stock at BDC, it's higher than stock at TDC. The rods are going to be different, but you'd have to talk to Tom to see how the compression changes. It might be higher. And if you see in the vid of the probe, he runs 10 psi on pump gas. At 15.5:1 compression, that's gotta be some nasty timing retard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Wow, I'm totally learning a lot from you guys. I'm reading an article about engine knock and octane rating right now. This isn't something that would happen within the year, I'd need to save money monthly, plus I'm not tinkering with my engine until I'm totally confident in my skills. Fayetteville Tech has a night course in engine performance that would help. I'm not sure what kind of high octane fuel is available here, but if I ever make it back to Bryan, TX where I want to end up (to finish studies at Texas A&M) there's a speedway nearby that should have resources. So maybe that would be the time to do it. Prob a good 2-3 years down the line, plenty of time to gain wisdom and skill on the process.

:wub:
 

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QUOTE (kismetmiss @ Jun 3 2010, 12:31 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=808976
Wow, I'm totally learning a lot from you guys. I'm reading an article about engine knock and octane rating right now. This isn't something that would happen within the year, I'd need to save money monthly, plus I'm not tinkering with my engine until I'm totally confident in my skills. Fayetteville Tech has a night course in engine performance that would help. I'm not sure what kind of high octane fuel is available here, but if I ever make it back to Bryan, TX where I want to end up (to finish studies at Texas A&M) there's a speedway nearby that should have resources. So maybe that would be the time to do it. Prob a good 2-3 years down the line, plenty of time to gain wisdom and skill on the process.

:wub:[/b]
The best way to learn is to dive right in. I just posted pics of my engine bay over in the engine forum, check them out. Before I started wrenching on my Sable, all I knew was where the gas goes, and that I wanted more horsepower. Seriously, I was reading the manual, and saw the DOHC had 200hp, so I thought I could gain 55 hp if I made my pushrod a DOHC. I still have crazy notions birthed from inexperience from time to time, but that's the fun of learning (and refusing to grow up). I want to turbo my car eventually, and if you can imagine the engine bay sans UIM, airbox, and battery; there's tons of room for a turbo. I've sketched out a basic layout, let me know if you're interested.
 

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It's not worth the time, resources and money.

Just get an underdrive pulley and highflow y pipe. Or you can also look at a SHO for even more performance gains. Or swap in a SHO motor.
 

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Someone always comes along and says its not worth it. Its not cheap that is true. But worth it depends on whether you are willing to go all the way and do it properly. With a 3.0L Vulcan with 9:1 compression and 7 lbs boost, you are pushing 300 hp. It wouldn't be reliable with that much compression on a stock motor, but that is a lot of power. Of course at that point your trans wouldn't hold up too long without upgrading it as well. All the trans would need though is a shift kit and a better torque converter.
 

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QUOTE (Palach @ Jun 3 2010, 10:31 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=808993
QUOTE (fdogg96 @ Jun 3 2010, 01:25 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=808990
It's not worth the time, resources and money.

Just get an underdrive pulley and highflow y pipe. Or you can also look at a SHO for even more performance gains. Or swap in a SHO motor.[/b]
Don't be a hater.
[/b][/quote]

Nobody has successfully turbocharged a Vulcan..meaning..there hasn't been one that's never blown. I'm not a hater..i'm being realistic.
 

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QUOTE (Palach @ Jun 3 2010, 12:51 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=809022
QUOTE (LOUDSHO92 @ Jun 3 2010, 02:29 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=809004
It has been done to the SHO several times: SHO Forum

The Vulcan not so...[/b]
Apparently I can't read that forum as a guest, and it won't let me register with a hotmail account. I'm just going to sit on the sofa and drool imagining SHO's with 400+ hp.
[/b][/quote]

Since i'm a SHOForum member, here's show and tell. There is from 4 different cars with plenty more.







 
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