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Discussion Starter #1
so today i realized that when i changed my radiator(2 months ago), i installed transmission lines opposite way to radiator. i drove my car about 500 miles and radiator started leaking. my question is: is it possible to brake because of the tranny lines being installed incorrect, and can something bad happen to my transmission because of that?
thank you
 

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Please post in the right section.

Can a mod move this to the appropriate section?
 

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Is it leaking coolant or transmission fluid?

Why did you change the radiator on an 07? Seems way too young...

As for the in-radiator transmission cooler -- it does not matter which way the fluid flows. The cool side might be warmer if the lines are backward, but the temperature should not exceed the design limits.

If the fittings are under a lot of strain because the wrong-way transmission cooler lines are pulling down on the radiator, there might be transmission fluid leaks at the radiator fittings.
 

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QUOTE (OldWagon @ May 7 2009, 05:04 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=723426
Is it leaking coolant or transmission fluid?

Why did you change the radiator on an 07? Seems way too young...

As for the in-radiator transmission cooler -- it does not matter which way the fluid flows. The cool side might be warmer if the lines are backward, but the temperature should not exceed the design limits.

If the fittings are under a lot of strain because the wrong-way transmission cooler lines are pulling down on the radiator, there might be transmission fluid leaks at the radiator fittings.[/b]
ok but there is no way that tranny fluid can get mixed with the coolant right? and in radiator oil cooler can not be damaged because the wrong way lines?
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There's nothing fancy about what's inside the radiator. The portion given over to cooling/heating the transmission fluid is just a sealed pipe immersed in the coolant. It carries the fluid from one port to the other. And it stays sealed up unless it corrodes through (very rare) and/or is damaged (as in an accident).

Heat exchange is relatively efficient because a solid bath of coolant is more effective at removing (or adding) heat than is air.

The only issue would be that engineers typically put the cool side of a heat exchanger (the outlet) higher than the hot side, because heat rises and it's better to have a counter-flow. But, the difference between being hooked up right and hooked up wrong would only be a few degrees.

You won't melt solder or break the internal pipe with pressure because the fluid is going the wrong way.

Why did you originally change the radiator on an 07?

And, once again, what's leaking -- coolant or transmission fluid?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
QUOTE (OldWagon @ May 7 2009, 03:33 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=723499
There's nothing fancy about what's inside the radiator. The portion given over to cooling/heating the transmission fluid is just a sealed pipe immersed in the coolant. It carries the fluid from one port to the other. And it stays sealed up unless it corrodes through (very rare) and/or is damaged (as in an accident).

Heat exchange is relatively efficient because a solid bath of coolant is more effective at removing (or adding) heat than is air.

The only issue would be that engineers typically put the cool side of a heat exchanger (the outlet) higher than the hot side, because heat rises and it's better to have a counter-flow. But, the difference between being hooked up right and hooked up wrong would only be a few degrees.

You won't melt solder or break the internal pipe with pressure because the fluid is going the wrong way.

Why did you originally change the radiator on an 07?

And, once again, what's leaking -- coolant or transmission fluid?[/b]
its leaking coolant. i changed my radiator because i hit my car and radiator broke.
 

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If it's leaking coolant, then you have a faulty radiator. Either that, or the radiator mount is severely distorted and the radiator twisted apart when you fastened it down. The end caps (the tanks on either side) are pretty much just clamped on, unless you bought a full-metal radiator. I suppose they could come loose if the mounting process caused too much twisting.
 

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QUOTE (mario2121 @ May 7 2009, 02:21 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=723491
ok but there is no way that tranny fluid can get mixed with the coolant right? and in radiator oil cooler can not be damaged because the wrong way lines?
thank you[/b]
Any time you run ATF through a radiator there is a chance that ATF could mix with coolant if the cooler fails. Running through the wrong way shouldn't do too much except there might be a bigger temp gradiant between the ATF and coolant temps. That bigger the temp difference might slightly increase the chance of a fatigue failure. Failure of an ATF cooler inside a rad usually fills the transmission with coolant (very bad).
 
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