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Hello All,

New member here. I have owned a Ford Aspire (until my woman broadsided a curb after pulling a 180 on a rain-slicked road), currently own an Escort, a 4WD VW Camper Van, and just inherited a 95 Taurus from a friend who moved back to China. I have a lot of car experience, but the more you know, the more you realize you don't know so I am glad to be a member.

I am looking to change the tranny fluid and filter in my Taurus because it looks like the original fluid (car has 115K). When I dropped the pan on my Escort to change the filter, some of the threads in the bolt holes got stripped. What I realized later is that the ends of some of the tranny pan bolts stick up through the top of the tranny and are exposed to the elements. They were therefore rusted and caused thread damage when I removed them :dunno: . Luckily, enough were good that I was able to remount the pan and run the car without any leaks. Also luckily, the tranny pan on that car has a drain plug so I drain the pan at each oil change because I don't think I will ever be able to remove the pan again to change the filter because of the thread damage. :angryfire:

I haven't been under my car yet because it just snowed and I don't have a garage. My question is has anyone had the same problem with their Taurus? Do any Taurus' tranny's have plugs (no from what I have read)? Does anyone have any advice outside the obvious. I have read the pertinent posts. My car didn't come with an owners manual either. Are they easy to find?

Thanks.
 

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Owner's manuals can be had on ebay, or sometimes if you're lucky at salvage yards.

Every time I've stripped or cross threaded a trans pan bolt hole, I've heli-coil'd it. for some reason, I've never had that problem with any of my cars but always with a customer's car.
 

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Owner's manuals can be had on ebay, or sometimes if you're lucky at salvage yards.

Every time I've stripped or cross threaded a trans pan bolt hole, I've heli-coil'd it. for some reason, I've never had that problem with any of my cars but always with a customer's car.
[/b]
I have 1 stripped on my Taurus but luckily no leak. Whats "heli-coil'd"?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That's what I was afraid of. Who the heck is designing these cars anyway? American engineering at its best.
 

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Whats "heli-coil'd"?[/b]
Thread insert. You drill the damaged hole slightly larger, tap it, then install a thread insert and you can re-use the original sized bolt.


heli-coil
 

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I believe Paul Nimz has stated several times that you can get 1/4-28 bolts and they will thread right into the damaged hole.

Mike
B)
 

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I'd use either Heli-Coils like Rudy suggested or Mike's suggestion of 1/4-28 bolts. The aluminum on the trans housing is soft and the threads can strip easily. A Heli-Coil would be a permanent fix, while the 1/4 bolt would cut it's own threads but may strip out again later.... I'd use that for a car I didn't care much about.
 

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How do you feel about Super glue Luke

Mike
:dunno:
 

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Yes I just use the 1/4 28 bolts. And yes if you aren't careful they will strip too. But I never did strip another. Got to have the feel when tightening them up. And never use a torque wrench.
 

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<div class='quotemain'>
How do you feel about Super glue Luke

Mike
:dunno:
[/b]

Works great to repair cuts in flesh. Cheaper and simpler than stitches. [/b][/quote]

Not cheaper at the emergency room. They think they had me fooled when they called it "Cyanoacrylate" - everybody knows that's superglue. C'mon! Charged me $1500 for it to boot! :angry:
 

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And never use a torque wrench.[/b]
Are you saying you don't use a torque wrench, or are you telling the rest of us not to?

I've changed the ATF on 2 Tauri, a Contour, a LeBaron, a few Marauders & Crown Vics, and a Thurderbird, multiple times on most of them, and I always use a torque wrench...never stripped a bolt.
 

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Do not use a torque wrench on small bolts in aluminum. Way to easy to strip the threads because it hasn't reached the torque setting.
 

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Then why do the factory service manuals give torque specs for those bolts? I thought that was the whole IDEA of using a torque wrench, so you DON'T end up stripping threads...
 

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ALWAYS USE A TORQUE WRENCH.

NEVER USE A TORQUE WRENCH WITH THE WRONG WORKING RANGE.

Serious Wrenchs own/use more than one torque wrench because they know that the most accurate portion of a torque wrench's usable range is at the 60-80% mark.

Valve cover, oil pans, and trannys pans are often spec'cd at 10-15 inch pounds.

Most standard 3/8" torque wrenches have a marked range somewhere around 10-100 foot-pounds.

Many 1/2" torque wrenches have a marked range somewhere around 50-150 foot pounds.

So most torque wrenches have the wrong calibration to bwe used on valve covers, oil pans and tranny pans.

That means that if you have one torque wrench in your tool box and you try to use it, you are going to wreck the bolts and threads of the delicate gasket seals.

There are torque wreches calibrated in inch pounds. They are usually pointer type torque wrenches. There are also expensive, high-end name-brand, click type, one-hand torque wrenches (look more like screwdrivers) available.

The key here is to NEVER USE any torque wrench at the ends of the scales. Always try to stay close to the middle or slightly higher than the middle of the range for the best/most accurate operation.
 

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<div class='quotemain'>
How do you feel about Super glue Luke

Mike
:dunno:
[/b]

Works great to repair cuts in flesh. Cheaper and simpler than stitches.
[/b][/quote]


I used to do that twenty years ago and people looked at me like I was stupid.

I still get those looks sometimes but now it isn't because I am superglueing cuts closed.

Mike
B)
 

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Be my guest and use a torque wrench. The specs are for clean and oiled new threads. What do you have?

The only thing I use a a torque wrench on when putting together my latest engine was the heads, and cam journals and timing cover. Through if I were putting in new rod bearings and I would use one there too. Any where else and I go by feel only.
 
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