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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all! I'm new here...

I own a '99 Taurus wagon SE with the AX4N tranny and she has about 145k highway miles. Recently, when shifted from park or neutral into gear, the whole body jerks (like a newbie driving stick)....I can't recall it ever doing this before. Any ideas or am I just going nuts?

Thanks!
 

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Welcome#2! Depending on fluid condition and mileage since last service, might be time for fluid and filter change. I would check the level, color and smell on the dipstick. People here recommend ea. 30k mi.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Welcome#2! Depending on fluid condition and mileage since last service, might be time for fluid and filter change. I would check the level, color and smell on the dipstick. People here recommend ea. 30k mi.
P.S.: That idle sounds a tad high?
Thanks #2! ;)

I'll check it out. It's probably been longer than 30k, but I'll check my records. :D

Do you know what the average idle is? Someone else wanna chime in? :unsure:
 

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I would also check the tranny and motor mounts. If you have a busted mount the car will kinda feel like it jumped with a clunk. Jim
 

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Idle should be 700-800 in gear or neutral. About 1000 when you first start it, then dropping to normal within 10-30 seconds. Maybe your IAC is sticking.
 

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When you check your trans fluid, if its black do not change it, in part or whole. Ford's specs say Idle speed should be 875-925 RPM for your car.
 

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When you check your fluid if its not pink, change. If its black, change it. Leaving old black fluid in there is not going to do you any favors. Heck, lets try the same logic with your engine oil and see how long you have a car.

Your trans will never run better on old fluid. What will kill the transmission is a power flush, but those will kill it whether the fluid is old and burnt or its brand new. Use the gentle flush method posted in the sticky.
 

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Try the above suggestions first. If these are not the problem you could have a broken accumulator spring. They are the 3 springs on the left of the picture.
 

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Clutch friction discs are made of steel with a paper coating, over time the paper wears down, and joins with the fluid.
As your discs wear down it becomes harder for the transmission to shift but, the debris in your fluid (bits and peices of the paper) help the fricton discs grab hold of the steels and engage the clutch pack.
I dont disagree that old fluid isnt good but, if its black the fluid is full of those bits and peices of debris and after you change the fluid you remove them and make it even more difficult to shift.
If its pink to a dark brown color I recommend changing it when the manufacturer recommends it, if its black run it into the ground and rebuild the transmission.
Your car is yours, take whoevers advice you wish this is just what I learned in auto trans class.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Clutch friction discs are made of steel with a paper coating, over time the paper wears down, and joins with the fluid.
As your discs wear down it becomes harder for the transmission to shift but, the debris in your fluid (bits and peices of the paper) help the fricton discs grab hold of the steels and engage the clutch pack.
I dont disagree that old fluid isnt good but, if its black the fluid is full of those bits and peices of debris and after you change the fluid you remove them and make it even more difficult to shift.
If its pink to a dark brown color I recommend changing it when the manufacturer recommends it, if its black run it into the ground and rebuild the transmission.
Your car is yours, take whoevers advice you wish this is just what I learned in auto trans class.
Thanks for the response-- I changed the fluid out, and it doesn't seem to be shifting any harder, so maybe I got lucky. :p
 

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Clutch friction discs are made of steel with a paper coating, over time the paper wears down, and joins with the fluid.
As your discs wear down it becomes harder for the transmission to shift but, the debris in your fluid (bits and peices of the paper) help the fricton discs grab hold of the steels and engage the clutch pack.
I dont disagree that old fluid isnt good but, if its black the fluid is full of those bits and peices of debris and after you change the fluid you remove them and make it even more difficult to shift.
If its pink to a dark brown color I recommend changing it when the manufacturer recommends it, if its black run it into the ground and rebuild the transmission.
Your car is yours, take whoevers advice you wish this is just what I learned in auto trans class.
Thats what they are teaching you in auto trans class? And you are paying for that kind of education?

The bits of friction material that get into the fluid acts like a sand blasting agent, destroying the entire trans, especially the bearings, and valve and servo bores. This means that when the transmission fails, instead of doing a replacing a few failed parts, the entire transmission needs and overhaul, driving up the cost of rebuilding it.

The lost friction material does not allow the friction surfaces to engage, the remaining friction material and the friction modifiers int he fluid do that, all the loose stuff in the fluid does is destroy the transmission's innards.
 
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