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Discussion Starter #1
I was fortunate enough too have the two master techs at the Ford dealership I work at, take a look at the dilemma I am having with my car. A few weeks back, I was pulling out of my driveway and for some reason just I felt compelled to burn rubber. So 20 ft. away from my driveway I decide to let up on the gas when suddenly I was greeted by this very abrupt, harsh, vibration
. So I pulled back into my driveway and into my garage to try to figure things out. Unclear of what had happened to my car. I decided to see if one of the techs could look at it were I work. I was fortunate enough to have the only 2 master techs take a look at my car off the clock during their lunch break. So we pulled my car into an empty bay and lifted it up to take a better look at the suspension. While standing there eating his peanut butter&jelly sandwich pondering what the problem might be, one of them enlightened me to the fact that lower control arm bushing at the point where it connects to the subframe had cracked (thus explaining the horrendous wheel hop) and that it must be rewelded. Coincidently it had cracked on the same side as the torq strap. After both of them gave the situation a good look over they had concluded it was caused by the torq strap. So my question is, have I routed the strap properly? To give you an idea of my setup I followed these directions.
http://www.taurusclub.com/modules.php?name...=article&sid=55
How else should I rout the chain?
 

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I have a gen3 duratec, so maybe that's why mine is different. But what's all this 'slip the chain through the engine mounting assembly next to the power steering' stuff? Also, that set-up sounds like you used the loop method. Is that right?

I used the exhaust manifold as the upper mounting point, and used a nut and bolt to make a small tight loop around it. I left slack on one side if the chain and brought it down to the subframe, the other side of the chain should have no slack from the little loop you made because you should slip the bolt through the last link on that side of the chain. Then I used a long bolt, maybe 5 or 6" and slipped that through the other end link of the chain and then through a hole that was already in the subframe. Now, the long side of the chain should almost make it down to the subframe, but not quite, so that when you slide the bolt through the chain and through the subframe and put a nut on the other side. That way, as you tighten the bolt, it pulls the chain down.

Does that make sense? Sorry I don't have a digital camera, but I think Paul Nimz has pics of his, and he's where I got the idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the help. Yes I am using the loop setup. I am just also I little nervous about wraping a chain around the exhaust manifold. I am afraid that would bend or warp the manifold. Thats why I need to see pics.
 

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When applying the chain around the manifold be sure to have it tight at this point but a bit of slack at the other end. The manifold is probably the strongest piece of metal on your engine. The best thing about using the manifold it it is centered in the motor. Any off setting point of attachment from center will induce and aggravate the already twisting motion.
 

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Originally posted by SHOZ123@Jan 21 2004, 11:33 AM
The manifold is probably the strongest piece of metal on your engine. The best thing about using the manifold it it is centered in the motor...
That's right, in fact, Ford has special brackets that attach right to the Vulcan exhaust manifolds for the purpose of lifting the engine up (to drop the oil pan, for example).
 
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