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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So one never has the right tool at the right time.
And garage sales.:D

I walked up the street and they guy gave me this. In the box. Said no one wanted any thing like that any more.

Not going in to what happened to my old one.

Anyway, what would one do with this. OK suppose you wanted to check your plug wires/plugs. Instead of clamping the wire, just move close enough to make it light and note the distance. Bad wire/plug will be quite different than a good one.

No start: Easy to see, you have fire, or not.

And for lawn mower and small engines. I have used one with paint marker marks on the flywheel and see if they hold their place. Have seen one a John Deere 13.5 hp have time all over the place and still run. Well depends on what you mean by run. Acted like it was not getting enough gas all the time. New mag and it ran fine and held the spark location.

Oh well old school tricks.
From the old Coot.:p

-chart-

ps last time I walked to a garage sale up the street, I got a 200# beam troque wrench, professional grade for $1. Got it hainging on a nail beside my #100 which is perfect for lug nuts.
 

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I can just hear the young members now..."what kind of paintball gun/hairdryer is THAT?"
I think that light was made for Sears by Sun. Top of the line high quality (and price) in it's day.
Life used to be so simple....

@97LX: I still have a Penske too, in its original box. My Dad bought it in like 1970...
young guy quote #2: "what's a dwell angle?"
 

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Some of the old tricks and tools can still be extremely useful, compression testers, vacuum gauges ect. Problem is the current generation relies to heavily on the computer and sensors to give them codes so much so that they don't know the basics of engine troubleshooting. When you get down to it engines still operate the same way as they always did, The difference is now there a computer making constant adjustments.
 

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Some of the old tricks and tools can still be extremely useful, compression testers, vacuum gauges ect. Problem is the current generation relies to heavily on the computer and sensors to give them codes so much so that they don't know the basics of engine troubleshooting. When you get down to it engines still operate the same way as they always did, The difference is now there a computer making constant adjustments.
Yes. I can't tell you how many times I've been at an auto parts store where a young clerk does a free scan for a young customer and the customer buys whatever part name shows up on the scanner, i.e. EGR, O2 sensor, etc. and then gets PO'ed because the code is still there. Kids sometimes don't understand that a scanner only points to the SYSTEM where the problem is, not what part to buy...
 

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I have two timing light in my tool box, along with a dwell/tachometer, 4 bank vacuum gauge set, compression tester, cylinder leak down gauge, distributer base nut wrenches, gauss meter, and a bunch of other random/oddball tools.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have two timing light in my tool box, along with a dwell/tachometer, 4 bank vacuum gauge set, compression tester, cylinder leak down gauge, distributer base nut wrenches, gauss meter, and a bunch of other random/oddball tools.
Most of the younger do not have a clue what those things are.

Also many do not know how to check compression anyway.

If they do not disable the fuel pump, they will flood the engine, not know why it will not start.:lol2:

And of course there are still cars out there with distributors. And some you can set the timing. Last one I did was a '95 3.8L in a Sable and it was a bear to read. Used a mirror on a stick, just like the book said. :p

I do not have a dist wrench. I do not have a distributer. I carried one in the trunk along with a coil in the '87 through '90 ones I owned. Used it beside the road when the ign failed. Oh the good old days. NOT!

-chart-
 

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LMAO. :lol2: When I was cleaning up the tool boxes for the move, I found a drawer in one box with about 20 packs of matches, a nice set of feeler gauges and a listing of gap settings for the points on different ditributors and engines that I worked on back in the day. How many kids today could set an old mallory dual point dist and keep the car running through the RPM range ???? :lol2:
 

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I'm only 28 but I do know that the point gap on a '53 Chev is approximately the thickness of a matchbook cover.
 

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Ive still got the 90 degree dizzy wrenches, dwell meter, engine analyzer kit and the flexible screwdriver hex tool for setting points through the slide-up dizzy window on a gm. Got my r-12 ac manifold gauges and partial case of r-12 cans, lol! Hell, im ready for the freakin time machine, baby! Back to the future!
 

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Ive still got the 90 degree dizzy wrenches, dwell meter, engine analyzer kit and the flexible screwdriver hex tool for setting points through the slide-up dizzy window on a gm. Got my r-12 ac manifold gauges and partial case of r-12 cans, lol! Hell, im ready for the freakin time machine, baby! Back to the future!
Sheila, your sitting on a mini gold mine there with the r-12. :lol2: I know there are still people out there looking for that for vintage rides that they dont want to change over.
 

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I'm only 28 but I do know that the point gap on a '53 Chev is approximately the thickness of a matchbook cover.
Thats why all the matchbooks....LOL :lol2: I never smoked, but always carried around a matchbook at the track. That was good enough to get the cars running, but some of them we had dialed in so close, needed the feelrs to set them just right. Then you had to have the same person set them, cuz almost never would 2 people get the same "feel" on the gauges. A couple of our cars were really picky on the point settings, even more so with the dual point set-ups.
 

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Dennis, just came up from the cellar and sitting next to my green 30 lb. tank of r134a is a near-full white 30 lb. tank of r-12, lol!
 

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Dennis, just came up from the cellar and sitting next to my green 30 lb. tank of r134a is a near-full white 30 lb. tank of r-12, lol!
I want that!

In Canada, you have to get a card to buy r134a. Hydrocarbon refrigerants are far more common at our parts stores. If you ever take a trip down to Mexico, I hear you can pick up a tank of R-12 and sneak it home, if you don't mind the possible fines.
 

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At one time, I had three 30 pounds tanks of R12. My father was teaching an adult ed class in basic heating and air conditioning when they started talking about getting rid of R12. He bought the 3 tanks plus about 6 cases of the small cans. When he passed away, my mother had a garage sale, and she didnt know what it was. She sold 4 cases at the marked price of a couple bucks a can, of course one guy bought them all. I found the 3 tanks and the rest of the small ones about a week later. I know I have seen the small cans selling on craigslist around here for $20 - $30 each recently.

I also know that if the EPA finds out you are selling R12, they can come down pretty hard on you becasue it is banned now.
 

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I had a total fill up of r12 dumped into my 7.3 F250 at $6 per 12oz can in Hermosillo, Mx over the winter. I had a shaft seal put into the compressor, a new hose made and a total fillup of r12 done for slightly under $200.
 

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I had a total fill up of r12 dumped into my 7.3 F250 at $6 per 12oz can in Hermosillo, Mx over the winter. I had a shaft seal put into the compressor, a new hose made and a total fillup of r12 done for slightly under $200.

LMAO.. :lol2: I have heard some stories about Hermosillo, Mx and its no wonder they still have r12 down there. The big thing is the good old EPA doesnt have any control down there.
 

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LMAO. :lol2: When I was cleaning up the tool boxes for the move, I found a drawer in one box with about 20 packs of matches, a nice set of feeler gauges and a listing of gap settings for the points on different ditributors and engines that I worked on back in the day. How many kids today could set an old mallory dual point dist and keep the car running through the RPM range ???? :lol2:
AHHHH....I too miss the good old days..tune-up..points plugs and condenser..DONE!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
Glass Chip Blower

One of a kind, my invention.
The little tube is part of a cake decorating thing, and the brass tube is from an old commode.

Used today to get broken glass out of my defroster vents. I could see the chips throught the winshield but could not vacuum them out, and the car def would give me a few every once and a while.

I put the climate on max fan and def, then used this with compressed air ~75# and blew down each little square in the grid. Then used a paint brush and shop vac to clean the dash. Used GooGone and a rag to pick up the tiny lingering chips. That also got rid of the finger prints from the glass installer guy and his helper. When I am sure all is clear, I will use saddle soap to dull the dash for minimum reflection.

DONE

Oh yes still need to take the seats out again and vacuum the whole car, again.

-chart-
 

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Your tool remembered me of my second car (Ford Escort). Bought used, of course, drive it from the lot and started the defroster (foggy). After some 10 seconds I see with th ecorner of my eye a soda straw popping up from the passanger side vent! I turned the fan on low, the straw got back in. High fan, straw was climbing up! That was grose and neat in the same time!
 
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