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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
With timing chain stretch, I'd have to think the timing is retarded at the valves = some wasted compression and not as much air intake. After seeing my chain at 165k and reading what others had posted about what chains look like at this point (pretty stretched with lots of flex left and right compared to a perfectly tight new timing set) I'd have to think my valve timing is quite a bit retarded from where it would be with a new chain. Is it worth replacing the chain and gears (timing set)? It's only around $40-50 for the chain and the two gears which is pretty cheap considering.

Anyone noticed a jump in fuel economy after changing? I haven't read a single case of the chain actually breaking. I'm sure it's probably happened to some poor soul who forgot to check their oil and ran low but as much as I searched Google, here and another Ford forum, I couldn't find one instance of a 3.0 Vulcan with a broken chain/engine failure due to the above.

So back to the original question, is it even worth bothering to change these stretched out old timing chains?

Is there a way to advance the spark timing a bit? Maybe adjust the cam and/or crank sensors?

I advanced the timing on the last car I owned and it helped with take off and seemed to help fuel economy a bit as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Anyone?
 

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You can only adjust the timing on '86-'95 models. '96 and newer uses a better computer management system and timing is not adjustable without a tuner since it doesn't have a distributor. If you plan on keeping the car for a while, then change the timing chain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Has anyone done a before and after on MPG/fuel economy with a timing chain change? I would guess there'd be an improvement due to the valves being in time again with the fresh unstretched chain. A stretched chain will retard the valve timing a bit.
 

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I bought my car non running so I don't know the before and after MPG but I do have this video of the chain I replaced at 180,000 miles that shows the amount it stretched.

 

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hi,

yes parts inexpensive but it takes some time to do the job.

how well is the engine running when you go up a steep hill,
and on the way down the hill?

if the chain is poor then the car will have problems up the hill but
on the way down it runs fine then the chain should be replaced.

regards
 

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My vulcan was still running @ 240k on the original chain, so no worries about breakage...actually its still going as I sold it to a friend of mine. It still runs great.
 

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A stretched timing chain is not good for your engine or you. With a stretched chain you'll have late valve timing and possibly poor vacuum making the engine run rough.

If you have a stretched chain what do you do to make-up for the loss in power? You push your foot harder on the gas pedal which results in poor fuel economy.

Timing chains are relatively inexpensive and can add increased performance and fuel economy. If possible get a double roller chain and sprockets. These are what a lot of race cars use. They cost more but should also last a lot longer than the OEM. Double roller chain and sprocket may be your last chain you buy.
 
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