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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings all. I recently tackled this, this morning. Having read all the different threads and approaches, I was dreading the UIM and possible LIM removal. Some folks had done it with just the UIM and a few without removing the UIM at all.

Of those, no one really discussed a good way to remove the locking PCV and how to lock the new PCV back in place. I assumed I could probably get enough grip with the new PCV rubber tubing, but it got about 1/8 of a turn from locking and would go no further. So, what I did was build a tool out of normal PVC tubing. I used a drimmel to remove the tubing where the PCV corners would slide through, effectively making a socket for the Ford PCV. It worked great and only took 10 minutes to do. So, here are the steps and some pics:

*Note: You won't have to remove your UIM or LIM to do this!!!


Tools:
10mm open end wrench
10mm socket
8 mm socket
flat head screw driver
pliers
vice grips/channel lock

1)Remove air cleaner housing top (two 8mm bolts).
2)Remove air filter.
3)Remove MAF sensor clip.
4)Put air cleaner housing top off to the side.
5)Remove two 10mm throttle body bolts.
6)Remove all or some of the rubbing tubing going to the throttle body, essentially you just want it out of the way.
7)Use the pliers to remove the clamp holding the PCV upper "L" shaped rubber tubing from the UIM/Throttle body connection tube.
8)Remove the "L" shaped tube and remove the plastic tube connecting the "L" shaped tube to the lower rubber hose.
9)Use some pliers to remove the lower rubber tubing going to the PCV. It may be a bit melted and old, so try to get it all out.
10)Using the channel locks/vice grips, lock onto the PCV (note, this will crack/break it) and turn it counter-clockwise until it comes out.
11)Using the old PCV, set it inside a piece of PVC tubing. Draw an outline on the lip. This will make a template of where the corners are on the PCV.
12)Using a drimmel, remove the "white" areas where the corners of the PCV sat.
13)Put the new PCV in the new PCV rubber tubing. Put the old PCV at the other end. This will give you a long enough extension to reach the PCV mount on the engine. Turn the PCV clockwise as far as you can till it stops turning.
14)Remove the old PCV and rubber tubing.
15)Using your new tool, attach it to the new PCV and turn it until it locks in place.
16)You're done. Reassemble in reverse order.
 

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Good job. The last one i did, i managed to get on it with a pair of long, angled hose pliers to twist it out and in. It was still tight, but didn't require removal of anything other than the air intake tube and maybe the throttle linkage - can't remember exactly now.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
What size PVC tubing did you use, and how long a piece do you need?
[/b]
The PVC is regular 3/4". I cut a piece off that was less than a foot, just long enough to reach and lock onto the PCV. You will have to use the drimmel on the inside of the PVC tube to flatten the contours.
 

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I had the PCV code pop up again a couple of weeks ago and cleared the code for now...so I'll have to tackle this eventually. Great writeup!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I had the PCV code pop up again a couple of weeks ago and cleared the code for now...so I'll have to tackle this eventually. Great writeup!
[/b]
I realized on the way back from the store today, I probably could have saved some time by making the PVC pipe template out of the new PCV I bought from Ford (rather than removing the old one with a pair of vice grips).

Oh well, if you're looking to vent on a poor design, follow my method to a tee!!! (otherwise make the PVC tool first).
 

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Ok - Just picked up a "Handy Dandy" piece of PVC for my PCV.

I'll try it here in a bit.

Sleeves rolled up, and I'm ready to tackle this!

:tcca_small:
 

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<div class='quotemain'>
Ok - Just picked up a "Handy Dandy" piece of PVC for my PCV.

I'll try it here in a bit.

Sleeves rolled up, and I'm ready to tackle this!

:tcca_small:
[/b]

How did it go?
[/b][/quote]

Welp. Kudos on the tool. That worked. I don't have a dremel, and despise them typically - my buddy has a die grinder, so - I had to get creative with the wheel. I eventually got the pvc where the pcv would go into it.

I took the airbox off, and took the large hose off at the throttle body - moved everything out of the way. It was STILL near impossible to see the damn thing! I pulled the rubber hose off the pcv, and used the tool to get it out. That wasn't real easy, but I got it. I had the new hose - tried to pull the clamp side off the bottom of the throttle body, and wasn't able to get it off. The rubber on that end looked good, so - I installed the new pcv, pulled the clamp end off my new hose, pushed the new hose on the pcv in the engine, and hooked the plastic tube into the old larger hose that was clamped.

After I buttoned it all up - I looked in my records, and in 2005 it had 138,000 on the clock and when I worked at the dealership - I must have had the guys replace it. It's got almost 170,000 on it now, so I didn't hurt anything I don't believe. If I would have screwed up something - it wouldn't run well. It runs nice, and seems to idle just a bit better.

Thanks for all the great help!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Glad it worked out for ya! Depending on how long you made your PVC tool, it could be trying. I made mine about 2 ft long and removed all the pieces you mentioned.

Yeah, that larger elbow is a pain to remove. The OEM install has the clamp faced toward the firewall. If that wasn't bad enough, Ford sealed the rubber to the metal clamp (that's how my new one arrived).

On the new one, I peeled the metal clamp off the elbow and repositioned it to face the radiator. Removing the old one took some creative moves and 90 degree needle nose pliers. The new one is now a synch to remove...don't know why Ford did it that way, the clamp doesn't impede or rub on anything in the new position.
 

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Glad it worked out for ya! Depending on how long you made your PVC tool, it could be trying. I made mine about 2 ft long and removed all the pieces you mentioned.

Yeah, that larger elbow is a pain to remove. The OEM install has the clamp faced toward the firewall. If that wasn't bad enough, Ford sealed the rubber to the metal clamp (that's how my new one arrived).

On the new one, I peeled the metal clamp off the elbow and repositioned it to face the radiator. Removing the old one took some creative moves and 90 degree needle nose pliers. The new one is now a synch to remove...don't know why Ford did it that way, the clamp doesn't impede or rub on anything in the new position.
[/b]

The PVC idea was a good one. I had it too long at first, and on my second cut - made it a little too short, but it worked for the removal and installation.

That elbow appeared to have been replaced when they did mine back in 2005. They had the clamp toward the firewall. The rubber looked ok - so, I just left it. It was an ever lovin' you know what to try to get off - I didn't have a 90 degree plier set near.

I agree - why didn't Ford position the clamp toward the radiator? Quality is job 1. :ford:

Either way, it's got a new pcv, and all new hose up to the elbow - then, I had to cheat.

:dunno:
 

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Will this procedure be necessary for the 96-99 duratec or is there another procedure for that gen? Thanks



<div class='quotemain'>
Glad it worked out for ya! Depending on how long you made your PVC tool, it could be trying. I made mine about 2 ft long and removed all the pieces you mentioned.

Yeah, that larger elbow is a pain to remove. The OEM install has the clamp faced toward the firewall. If that wasn't bad enough, Ford sealed the rubber to the metal clamp (that's how my new one arrived).

On the new one, I peeled the metal clamp off the elbow and repositioned it to face the radiator. Removing the old one took some creative moves and 90 degree needle nose pliers. The new one is now a synch to remove...don't know why Ford did it that way, the clamp doesn't impede or rub on anything in the new position.
[/b]

The PVC idea was a good one. I had it too long at first, and on my second cut - made it a little too short, but it worked for the removal and installation.

That elbow appeared to have been replaced when they did mine back in 2005. They had the clamp toward the firewall. The rubber looked ok - so, I just left it. It was an ever lovin' you know what to try to get off - I didn't have a 90 degree plier set near.

I agree - why didn't Ford position the clamp toward the radiator? Quality is job 1. :ford:

Either way, it's got a new pcv, and all new hose up to the elbow - then, I had to cheat.

:dunno:
[/b][/quote]
 

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Very creative. Way better than the way I did it.

Mike
:thumb:
 

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Will this procedure be necessary for the 96-99 duratec or is there another procedure for that gen? Thanks

The 96 (not sure what years are the same, but think through -99) is easier, just take the throttle body - MAF bellows off the throttle body and lift out of the way, and it's fairly easy to access under the throttle body. I just did mine last weekend at 153k mis and it was surprisingly easy, just used fingers plus end of straight screwdriver to separate PCV from attached hoses/fittings.
 

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I need to work on PCV too. After reading through all the posts, I am still now sure about the things to be removed before attacking PCV and how to remove PCV and the elbow. Could somebody post a step by step manual with pictures?
 

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Hey you guys are probably defeating Ford's purpose by designing a tool for that job................. :thumb:
 

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I searched the forum to see look for rules on bumping old threads and didn't see any, so here goes.

My 2000 Taurus was displaying all of the classic symptoms: sputtering at idle, dieing at stoplights and of course, the ubiquitous P0171 and P0174 codes. I googled and found several possible fixes. I changed the fuel filter first. It was cheap and hadn't been done in who knows how long. Next I cleaned the MAF sensor. Then I changed the MAF sensor. Then I found this thread.

It only took me 2 hours to get the old PCV valve off. (Hey, I'm a computer geek, cut me a little slack) In fact, I had given up on it and was trying to put everything back together when it fell off into my hand. The next day, I sent my wife to Wally World and she bought a B&D "Dremel" tool. Then, I went back and bought some attachments because it only comes with a sanding wheel. I fashioned the PVC pipe and voila!, the PCV valve clicked into place. I put everything back together and so far, so good. No stalling. No codes.

So, thank you very much to 1993MercSable for the instructions and the innovative tool. If you're ever in southwest Oklahoma, I'll gladly buy you the beverage of your choice.

:notworthy:
 

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I didn't have any PVC pipe around the house, but I did have a piece of 3/4" thinwall steel conduit. At the bench grinder, I cut two notches in the end and enlarged them to the point where there were two small tabs about 5/16" wide and about 3/16" long sticking out from the end of the tubing. Then, with pliers, I bent these tabs out very slightly. The tool was about 10" long overall, because that was what I had, but two or three inches longer might actually help.
After digging down to the PCV valve and pulling off the short length of rubber tubing on it using long needle nosed pliers, I was ready to use the magical tool. I slipped it over the end of the PCV valve. The tabs on the end of the tool can then engage the square flange of the valve. Using pliers to rotate the tool and valve, it just popped out, slick as can be. Use the tool to install the new valve too. I wrapped the new valve with a few wrappings of newspaper to hold it snugly in the tool, and it was very easy to direct it into place and rotate it to lock it.
I can't imagine how you are expected to do this job without a tool to grab and hold the valve. It's a piece of cake with it.
 

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Just replaced my PCV on my 2000 Duratec.
After building the tool in the picture above, it took me 7 minutes to remove and replace the valve WITHOUT removing/undoing anything. Yep, slid the pipe onto the PCV turned it CCW, put the new one into the pipe with the newspaper trick, turned CW 90 degrees reattached the PCV hose that goes to the throttle body and I was done.

My pipe was 14 inches long.
3/4 inch thin wall conduit from Home Depot.
(perfect length)

Just do it! It's easy.

Thank you DenniswithSable you're the man!
 
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