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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All,

I have had some really great luck from you guys and gals on here and I was hoping to get some more help!

I have two issues that I am trying to resolve with this thread with my 2002 SES 3.0L 12V:

1. The driver's side door closed/open sensor seems to be malfunctioning. The car consistently thinks that the door is open and now the automatic door locks will not engage. Any ideas on what may be the issue and where this sensor is located?

2. The more difficult problem: I get a lot of rumble in the wheel and a vibration of the car when breaking. I recently (this past weekend, 6/6/11) had two new front tires, balancing, and a front end alignment done at pepboys (which I am no longer going to because of all the crappy service they have been providing, but that is another story). Just prior to that, I replaced the inner and outer tie rod ends because there was "some play" in the inners.

Following the alignment, this steering wheel rumble and the whole car vibration while braking was REALLY bad. So, today, I swapped out both rotors and the issue died down some, but is still there. I am at a stand still at this point as to what to do. The front brake lines, the rotors (the ones swapped out today), the calipers and the pads were all swapped out in November 2009 at pepboys. I looked everything over today and the pads seem to be wearing nice and evenly and the calipers seem to be in a great condition. I just cannot figure out why the car keeps rumbling like it does when I brake.

Any thoughts?

Many thanks in advance!
 

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Bad rear rotors can be felt through the wheel also. You have 2 brake systems, each connected diagonally front to rear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Bad rear rotors can be felt through the wheel also. You have 2 brake systems, each connected diagonally front to rear.
I should have added this before. I did a full replacement on the rear brakes about 2 weeks ago. That included drums, shoes, brake hardware, brake lines from the flex line to the slave cylinder and the slave cylinders on both sides.

While I am listing repairs, I also did rear struts 2 years ago and had the front springs replaced 3 years ago all because of the 2000-2001 recall on springs catastrophically failing. Mine is a 2002 but was manufactured in the first week of January 2002 and I am convinced that the springs failed because of the similar 2000-2001 recall. It was bad considering they failed with the car sitting parked in the driveway. Wrecked two tires in the process. The front failed almost a year to the day before the rears went. I still have them so that maybe I can get my money reimbursed by Ford...we will see about that though. It doesn't seem likely at this point.
 

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New flex lines too?
Don't feel too bad about your springs, my 96 front coils were s**t too. I had one break in the driveway, sounded like a gun going off. I could see where the rust ate up to the fracture point on the coil. That problem existed way before it was addressed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
New flex lines too?
Don't feel too bad about your springs, my 96 front coils were s**t too. I had one break in the driveway, sounded like a gun going off. That problem existed way before it was addressed.
I did not do new flex lines as they seemed to be in decent condition. The issue really came out when I did the tie-rod replacement. Is there a good way to check if the lines are in need of replacement?
 

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I do know that flex lines tend to deteriorate from the inside out. They can break down on the inside and act like a one-way check valve for brake fluid. In other words, your caliper or wheel cyclinder will kind of lock up because the fluid can't return when your foot is off the brake. Are all of the slider pins where your calipers attach loose and free?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I do know that flex lines tend to deteriorate from the inside out. They can break down on the inside and act like a one-way check valve for brake fluid. In other words, your caliper or wheel cyclinder will kind of lock up because the fluid can't return when your foot is off the brake. Are all of the slider pins where your calipers attach loose and free?
Makes sense about the rear flex lines. I will definitely look into that. Might be worth the change.

In regards to the front slider pins, I have no idea. Are the pins also the bolts that connect the caliper to the caliper bracket? Or are they inside those little boots that the bolts seem to screw in to? How does one check if those are sliding well?
 

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Like Dan, i was going to suggest rotors all the way around but it seems brakes are up to snuff at all 4 corners. Dunno? For your door lock/sensor problem, spray the door latches at the ends of all doors liberally with wd-40 and for long-lasting protection, follow-up with white lithium grease spray. To check the slide pins, remove the 12mm cap bolts (not the 15mm caliper mount bracket bolts) and pull boot and pin out. Clean with a rag or paper towel, slather with never-seize and replace.
 

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They are inside those boots. You can pull the boot right off, it slides back on. The caliper mounting bolts screw into the pins, and the pins must be clean and greased and slide in and out of their bores easily. The pins are part of the caliper mounting bracket, and a new caliper doesn't include bracket or pins. I have seen many a new caliper mounted to frozen slider pins. Frozen slider pins can wreak havoc with your brakes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Like Dan, i was going to suggest rotors all the way around but it seems brakes are up to snuff at all 4 corners. Dunno? For your door lock/sensor problem, spray the door latches at the ends of all doors liberally with wd-40 and for long-lasting protection, follow-up with white lithium grease spray. To check the slide pins, remove the 12mm cap bolts (not the 15mm caliper mount bracket bolts) and pull boot and pin out. Clean with a rag or paper towel, slather with never-seize and replace.
They are inside those boots. You can pull the boot right off, it slides back on. The caliper mounting bolts screw into the pins, and the pins must be clean and greased and slide in and out of their bores easily. Frozen slider pins can wreak havoc with your brakes.
I will have to do this the next time I can get under the car. Also, I am going to take Dan's suggestions from another thread on doing a transaxle fluid change. Thank you Sheila for the info about where the pins are located.

Any suggestions on a particular anti-seize to use?
 

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Any never-seize is good never-seize. Copper or nickle formula is good.
 
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