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I have this squealing/squeaking sound coming from my engine until the car warms up. It seems to come from the rear of the engine can't exactly pinpoint seems to be on the driver side but not definate. It's not the belt, idler, or tensioner had all those replaced. any ideas? water pump? don't have a leak though? Help!?
 

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Take the cardboard core from an old paper towel roll, and put it against your ear while you're under the hood when the engine is warming up. It works as kind of a crude stethescope, you'll be able to hear the noise a lot clearer when the tip of the tube is pointing at it's source.

This will allow you to pin down the source of your squeak to a small area.

It's a place to start.
 

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Barnz67 - what engine is in your car? If it's a vulcan, that noise is most likely the camshaft position sensor, located at the back of the engine, on top, where an old-style distributor would be. Look behind the back of the intake manifold, under and beside the throttle body. You'll see a round plastic cap with a plug on it. That's the sensor itself. The part that wears is the synchronizer assembly that it's attached to, which runs down into the top of the block, and mates with a gear on the camshaft. These are pretty common for wearing out, and they make a squeaking/chirping noise when the go. I've changed a few of them. They aren't all that expensive - i think the last one i bought cost me around $100 cdn. I don't think it came with the sensor, so you'll likely have to transfer it to the new one. Don't wait too long to replace it, because if it gets worn back enough, the vane on the top of the synchro will start to hit the inside of the sensor and destroy it, and then you'll have to change it to. The CMP is used to synchronize the fuel injection timing with the engine speed, not for spark timing, as some people think. There is a trick to changing it tho - if you don't have it positioned and aligned properly, the injection timing will be out, and will cause a hesitation when you step on the gas. It may also cause the CEL to some on, but probably not. There is a special tool that the dealer uses to make sure it's installed properly, but even being a dealer tech myself, i don't always use it. What i do is this - obviously, make sure the engine is off, and take the key out of the ignition so nobody cranks if over on you. Remove the sensor from the top of the synchro. Put 2 paint marks in a line - one on the vane in the synchro, and one on the synchro housing. Now put another mark from the bottom of the synchro to the engine block. Remove the 10mm bolt from the hold-down clamp at the bottom of the synchro, and take it out - it'll have to twist a bit, since the gear at the bottom is angled. Line the marks back up, and then put it with your new synchro. Move the vane in the new synchro until it's sitting in the same position as the old one is with the marks lined up, then copy the marks onto the new synchro at the top and the bottom. Put a bit of lithium grease or some other kind of lube on the teeth of the new synchro, and a bit also on the rubber o-ring to make it easier to install. Then carefully twist the new one back down into the hole, making sure all your marks are lined up. If they don't, you may have to lift the synchro back out just enough to be able to turn the vane and line it up with the next tooth, then re-install it. When you have it pushed all the way into the hole, and the marks are all lined up, or very very close, you're alright. Install the hold-down and tighten the bolt, install the sensor, plug it in and fire it up. I say the marks don't have to be exact, because the sensor does operate and read properly within a small range, so if it's just a little bit out, it won't matter. The way to know is to start up the engine, and crack the throttle. If the engine bogs or hesistates slightly when you do that, the sensor isn't properly aligned. If it revs up like normal, you're good to go. Don't worry, having it mis-aligned won't cause any damage, it just causes that hesitation. I know it sounds like a pain in the butt to do, but it's really not too hard. You can always attempt it, but if you don't think you have the marks lined up close enough, put the old sensor back in and let a shop do it. Good luck!
 

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Originally posted by Nidan@Oct 21 2004, 01:37 PM
Barnz67 - what engine is in your car? If it's a vulcan, that noise is most likely the camshaft position sensor, located at the back of the engine, on top, where an old-style distributor would be. Look behind the back of the intake manifold, under and beside the throttle body. You'll see a round plastic cap with a plug on it. That's the sensor itself. The part that wears is the synchronizer assembly that it's attached to, which runs down into the top of the block, and mates with a gear on the camshaft. These are pretty common for wearing out, and they make a squeaking/chirping noise when the go. I've changed a few of them. They aren't all that expensive - i think the last one i bought cost me around $100 cdn. I don't think it came with the sensor, so you'll likely have to transfer it to the new one. Don't wait too long to replace it, because if it gets worn back enough, the vane on the top of the synchro will start to hit the inside of the sensor and destroy it, and then you'll have to change it to. The CMP is used to synchronize the fuel injection timing with the engine speed, not for spark timing, as some people think. There is a trick to changing it tho - if you don't have it positioned and aligned properly, the injection timing will be out, and will cause a hesitation when you step on the gas. It may also cause the CEL to some on, but probably not. There is a special tool that the dealer uses to make sure it's installed properly, but even being a dealer tech myself, i don't always use it. What i do is this - obviously, make sure the engine is off, and take the key out of the ignition so nobody cranks if over on you. Remove the sensor from the top of the synchro. Put 2 paint marks in a line - one on the vane in the synchro, and one on the synchro housing. Now put another mark from the bottom of the synchro to the engine block. Remove the 10mm bolt from the hold-down clamp at the bottom of the synchro, and take it out - it'll have to twist a bit, since the gear at the bottom is angled. Line the marks back up, and then put it with your new synchro. Move the vane in the new synchro until it's sitting in the same position as the old one is with the marks lined up, then copy the marks onto the new synchro at the top and the bottom. Put a bit of lithium grease or some other kind of lube on the teeth of the new synchro, and a bit also on the rubber o-ring to make it easier to install. Then carefully twist the new one back down into the hole, making sure all your marks are lined up. If they don't, you may have to lift the synchro back out just enough to be able to turn the vane and line it up with the next tooth, then re-install it. When you have it pushed all the way into the hole, and the marks are all lined up, or very very close, you're alright. Install the hold-down and tighten the bolt, install the sensor, plug it in and fire it up. I say the marks don't have to be exact, because the sensor does operate and read properly within a small range, so if it's just a little bit out, it won't matter. The way to know is to start up the engine, and crack the throttle. If the engine bogs or hesistates slightly when you do that, the sensor isn't properly aligned. If it revs up like normal, you're good to go. Don't worry, having it mis-aligned won't cause any damage, it just causes that hesitation. I know it sounds like a pain in the butt to do, but it's really not too hard. You can always attempt it, but if you don't think you have the marks lined up close enough, put the old sensor back in and let a shop do it. Good luck!
Great, Mine make squealing noise too. I took off the sensor and spray some sillicon into the top of the synchronizer. The noise gone. I'll keep using the synchronizer untill the noise come back and the sillicon can't deal with it. Money aha.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Nidan, Firespirit, leshan, thank you guys for your help. Yes I have a vulcan and that is the exact area that I hear the noise, I'm goingto try that asap. thanx again.
 

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I am swapping a 98 vulcan into a 96 sable and I need to replace the whole assembly. So I am going to have a fun time.
The two engines have different CMP sensors. The 98 engine has a different wire harness so the 98 CMP won't work with the 96 harness. The two sensors have a different design and each has a different tool to set them up.
I won't be able to rely on the marks because I am switching from engine to engine.
The whole synchronizer assembly is kind of worn "lots of metal filings"on the 96 engine. I think I'll buy a new synchronizer sensor set up since the 98 engine I'm putting in only has about 57000miles.
 
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