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First, let me start by stating that I am a relative newbi to car maintance and these procedures are very simple.

Engine: 3.0L Vulcan

Symptoms: Squealing coming from serpentine belt at a cool startup (i.e. sitting overnight, cool engine). The squealing tends to last about 10-15 mins and dissipates when engine has reached NORMAL operating temperature.

Tools:
The easiest way is to purchase a serpentine belt removal tool from your local shop (you may rent one as well). The average cost for this tool is $25-30. I opted for the purchase so that I may keep the tool in my trunk for those mishaps in the future... along with a new belt!
15mm 6pt or 12pt socket - comes with the serpentine belt removal tool.

Step 1: Remove the belt!
Place the serpentine belt removal tool with a 15mm socket onto the tensioner pulley bolt and rotate the bolt towards the front of the car (clockwise). This will relieve the tension on the belt and allow you to remove the belt.

Step 2: Inspect the belt.
The belt should not have cracks that run parallel to the grooves. It is okay for the belt to have some minor cracking that run perpendicular to the grooves (as the belt does twist and turn through the pulley system). If you belt shows signs of wear, replace the belt.

Step 3: Inspect the pulleys.
There are two pulleys on the 3.0 Vulcan that are apparently notorious for wearing out: The Tensioner pulley and the Idler pulley. They are the two pulley's that do not have any grooves on them (flat side of the belt goes against them). To test the pulleys, spin them. They should spin easily but quickly stop spinning. This is due to the fact that each pulley contains grease to coat the bearings inside. When there is no grease, the pulley will either (1) make a grinding noise or (2) spin easily and for a long amount of time (8-10 seconds). In either case where the pulley does not stop smoothly & quickly, the pulley has to be removed!

Step 4: Removing/Replacing the pulleys.
Then tensioner and idler pulleys each have a 15mm bolt on them that connects them to the engine block. Removal is towards the back of the engine (counter-clockwise). Remove the entire bolt and KEEP ALL THE PARTS. When purchasing the new pulley from a local part store, ONLY the pulley will be sold. Transfer the bolt and washer(s) that came off the old pulley to the new pulley and tighten down.

Step 5: Re-install belt.
The belt will go back on. One quick tip: The most common way will lend two pulleys to be last, the Alternator and the Idler pulley. It is easiest if the Alternator pulley is looped first leaving the Idler last. Because the idler pulley does not contain grooves it is easier to slip on. Also, use the Serpentine Belt tool to take tension off to assist in belt realignement.

Last: Before completing the job!
Ensure that the belt is flush with all the pulleys that have grooves (Alternator, Crankshaft, Water-pump, A/C, and Powersteering). If the belt is not properly aligned, when starting the car, the belt may shred! Also, ensure that the routing diagram is followed completely. Mis-routing the belt can cause serious damage.

Test it!
Start the car up and ensure that all the pulleys are running. Stand back before just putting your face down there though! The real test usually is when the engine has had plenty of time to cool down (i.e. mornings).

Hope this write-up, although simple, does help newbies like myself!

Serpentine Belt Routing Diagram (About.com)
 

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I had just replaced my belt and it was squeellin. A mechanic friend suggested that i simply grab a bar of soap, and with the engine running, run the bar of soap under the belt, and whalla, the squel has gone away and not come back. Just a simple trick.
 

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I just replaced a low rent squeeler from Dayco that lasted less than a year with a Goodyear Gator back. I hope this one lasts longer.
Does anyone know what the factory length was. This belt is 85.5 inches. and I have seen belts advertised for the Vulcan 3.0 from 82 to 88 inches...
 

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I'm about to replace the squealing belt on my 2000 Sable - looked though the Haynes manual and thought JFC, could they make this a bigger PIA? Two questions


Step 1: Remove the belt!
Place the serpentine belt removal tool with a 15mm socket onto the tensioner pulley bolt and rotate the bolt towards the front of the car (clockwise). This will relieve the tension on the belt and allow you to remove the belt.

Step 5: Re-install belt.
The belt will go back on. One quick tip: The most common way will lend two pulleys to be last, the Alternator and the Idler pulley. It is easiest if the Alternator pulley is looped first leaving the Idler last. Because the idler pulley does not contain grooves it is easier to slip on. Also, use the Serpentine Belt tool to take tension off to assist in belt realignement.


[/b]


When you rotate the pulley bolt clock wise - is this loosening the the nut on the pulley or are you releaving spring tension? Will it snap back once you let go? If so would it be easier to have one person (my wife or son) with a long cheater bar (so they can stand back out of the way) hold the tension pulley back while the other (me) installs the belt?
 

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Rotating it clockwise relieves spring tension. It does help if theres a second person holding the cheater bar.
 

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First, let me start by stating that I am a relative newbi to car maintance and these procedures are very simple.

Engine: 3.0L Vulcan

Symptoms: Squealing coming from serpentine belt at a cool startup (i.e. sitting overnight, cool engine). The squealing tends to last about 10-15 mins and dissipates when engine has reached NORMAL operating temperature.

Tools:
The easiest way is to purchase a serpentine belt removal tool from your local shop (you may rent one as well). The average cost for this tool is $25-30. I opted for the purchase so that I may keep the tool in my trunk for those mishaps in the future... along with a new belt!
15mm 6pt or 12pt socket - comes with the serpentine belt removal tool.

Step 1: Remove the belt!
Place the serpentine belt removal tool with a 15mm socket onto the tensioner pulley bolt and rotate the bolt towards the front of the car (clockwise). This will relieve the tension on the belt and allow you to remove the belt.

Step 2: Inspect the belt.
The belt should not have cracks that run parallel to the grooves. It is okay for the belt to have some minor cracking that run perpendicular to the grooves (as the belt does twist and turn through the pulley system). If you belt shows signs of wear, replace the belt.

Step 3: Inspect the pulleys.
There are two pulleys on the 3.0 Vulcan that are apparently notorious for wearing out: The Tensioner pulley and the Idler pulley. They are the two pulley's that do not have any grooves on them (flat side of the belt goes against them). To test the pulleys, spin them. They should spin easily but quickly stop spinning. This is due to the fact that each pulley contains grease to coat the bearings inside. When there is no grease, the pulley will either (1) make a grinding noise or (2) spin easily and for a long amount of time (8-10 seconds). In either case where the pulley does not stop smoothly & quickly, the pulley has to be removed!

Step 4: Removing/Replacing the pulleys.
Then tensioner and idler pulleys each have a 15mm bolt on them that connects them to the engine block. Removal is towards the back of the engine (counter-clockwise). Remove the entire bolt and KEEP ALL THE PARTS. When purchasing the new pulley from a local part store, ONLY the pulley will be sold. Transfer the bolt and washer(s) that came off the old pulley to the new pulley and tighten down.

Step 5: Re-install belt.
The belt will go back on. One quick tip: The most common way will lend two pulleys to be last, the Alternator and the Idler pulley. It is easiest if the Alternator pulley is looped first leaving the Idler last. Because the idler pulley does not contain grooves it is easier to slip on. Also, use the Serpentine Belt tool to take tension off to assist in belt realignement.

Last: Before completing the job!
Ensure that the belt is flush with all the pulleys that have grooves (Alternator, Crankshaft, Water-pump, A/C, and Powersteering). If the belt is not properly aligned, when starting the car, the belt may shred! Also, ensure that the routing diagram is followed completely. Mis-routing the belt can cause serious damage.

Test it!
Start the car up and ensure that all the pulleys are running. Stand back before just putting your face down there though! The real test usually is when the engine has had plenty of time to cool down (i.e. mornings).

Hope this write-up, although simple, does help newbies like myself!

Serpentine Belt Routing Diagram (About.com)
[/b]


Thanks for this info! my Idler just went bad tonight at 11pm. I thought it was going to be an expensive job but from the info I gathered here it is a pretty easy job. Kind of disappointed that the Haynes manual has no info on the part.

One question, when it I replace it what torque amount? My old Chilton's guide for my first 1991 Bull (R.I.P.) mentions 25-37 ft. lbs.

This site is great! :merc:
 

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I had just replaced my belt and it was squeellin. A mechanic friend suggested that i simply grab a bar of soap, and with the engine running, run the bar of soap under the belt, and whalla, the squel has gone away and not come back. Just a simple trick.
[/b]

How does the Bar of Soap Helps ?

My Bull also makes squeaking sound, when I start cold or when it rains. After few minutes, its gone.

I guess the squeaking sound is because of the belt getting hard in cold.
 

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I just changed my original belt out for a shorter one so I could bypass the broken A/C compressor .. 82 inches was perfect size. The right tool helps this job along a lot.
 

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is it always 100% necessary to replace the entire belt when you're hearing squeaking? can you just simply tighten it? and (if so..) how would you go about doing this?
 

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There is no tightening. It's a spring loaded tensioner. (read self adjusting)

Also, if you bring your vehicle in for warranty work, for say IDK the know bad Cam Synronizer. I do not care how sure you are that it is the cam sync. Replace the belt and save your self a $40 diagnostic fee.

Replacing the belt it a pain, trying to get it around the lower pulleys. Also Save your self the agrivation and get the Belt tensioner relase tool. I will be :- ) . Since the belt is rather wide and ridged on it;s width. You have to twist it to get it around the lower pulleys.
Also it is best to take the belt out of it's cardboard "box" and the "kinks" out. They make the belt move in ways you won;t want it to.

Additional. That diagram is also printed on the Dayco box (Advance auto Parts). Rotate the packaging, it's there. Listed a "common" ford 3.0 belt pattern.

Lot's of luck. and remember to replace it before a long trip. I almost got the XP for road side belt replacement. Almost. .
 

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Sometimes if it's just the belt squeaking a little squirt of WD-40 will make it stop. WD-40 is NOT a lubricant and won't make the belt slip. In this case it breaks up the glaze on the belts or pulleys that is causing it to slip a little and squeak. Besides it smells nice.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Just wanted to add my two cents on this post, since I haven't checked it in so long.

As far as adding stuff to the belt, whether that be 'belt dressing, soap, WD-40', I just don't see the sense in it. If there is a squeal coming from the accessory belt system (serpentine belt system) then some part is going bad. Taking the belt off and checking the different pulleys is always a good idea. You don't have to take the belt off from the lower pulleys to check the big three (Tensioner, Idler, Power Steering).

Again, The Idler and Tensioner will spin freely and slow down quickly if the ball bearing grease is still adequate. If there is too much play (in and out, side to side) in the PS Pulley than that PS is ready to go.

If the back part (flat part) of the belt is glazed, then pay the little $$$ for a new Gatorback (highly recommended by me and several others on TCCA)

Adding things to quite the belt could bite you on that long road trip. But again, that's just my $.02.

Good luck to those that read this in the future!
 

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Yup, I'm gonna go out and buy a new belt every time it makes a little noise.

I'm not saying soak it overnight, just a little shvitz and the noise goes away. Believe me I can tell the difference in sound between a pulley bearing going away and a simple belt squeak.

I have done this for years and have never experienced a belt failure.

Every time there is a post about belt noise and I mention this solution, somebody jumps all over my stuff and tries to say how bad it is. Wel,, from now on, enjoy your noisy belts......
 

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QUOTE (mmahoney @ Jun 7 2009, 02:21 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=730772
I just changed my original belt out for a shorter one so I could bypass the broken A/C compressor .. 82 inches was perfect size. The right tool helps this job along a lot.[/b]
This sounds great, mmahoney ! Could you please describe the routing of the 82" belt to bypass the AC compressor pulley? I have also a 2001 Vulcan 3.0.
Thanks in advance.

Yuri
 

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QUOTE (Steve J. @ Nov 18 2009, 04:40 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=767761
Thanks for the link. However, I asked you for what the routing was, not about what tool is needed. I can rent the same tool from Autozone for free (i.e., money back when I return the tool). The length 82 in. probably involves somewhat unusual routing because the original (with AC compressor) belt is about 85, and if you can bypass the compressor with almost the same length belt, it is rather difficult routing.
 

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Anyone got a picture or diagram of a serpentine belt routing for a 2000 Duratec DOHC? The owners manual doesn't show one, under the hood has no diagram, the Haynes service manual just shows routing for the Vulcan, and I haven't found one here searching threads, or even just a generic search on Google.
 

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I am not sure why this isn't posted, but what about checking if the pulleys are aligned properly? I had squeeling and it was due to the alignment of the pulleys. I think soap and wd-40 on belts is somewhat unprofessional, and just cover up the problem, please do not take that as an insult. Also, can't WD-40 damage belt material?
 

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I've replaced both pulleys and the belt on my 98 vulcan because it was squealing all the time. It started squealing again on warmup, so I returned the first belt and sprung for the expensive one. All was good until recently when started squealing on warmup again. Yesterday, I went outside with some wd40 and sprayed it inside the hole on the tensioner, then pulled back on the tensioner and sprayed again because I thought maybe something was sticking inside. Well, as of now there is no squeal... Let's see how long this lasts! Haha
 
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