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I hear people replacing there spark plugs and wires every 100k or even 80k.

But why wait so long ?? Is it bad to replace them every 20k, just to keep good fuel eco. and to keep that "Pick-up" on your car.
 

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Yeah, pretty much. Modern spark plugs are made of durable, an expensive materials. When you throw away spark plugs that have a lot of life left in them, you are talking platinum, and rare and precious metal, and just wasting it.

If you really want to keep good economy and power, you could pull them every 50,000 or so and regap them.
 

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Ford design of the spark plugs is prone to seizing the plugs in the block. The more time you let them in, the harder is to get them out. Torque at instalation is also critical.
Spark plug - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Most spark plugs seal to the cylinder head with a hollow metal washer which is crushed slightly between the flat surface of the head and that of the plug, just above the threads. If the torque used to install the plugs is not excessive, the washer can be reused when the plug is removed and reinserted, although this practice is, strictly speaking, not recommended and replacement washers are available.
Ford engines, however, were once distinct in using a tapered hole and a matching taper on the bottom of the plug above the threads, in order to seal the plug. The torque for installing and removing these plugs was higher and it was easier to break them if the wrench was applied partially off axis.
More recently, some types of Ford Fiesta, and Ka also had a similar sealing system. The torque required to install these plugs is less than with the above type, and it is extremely critical that they not be overtightened, since overtightening can result in it being difficult or impossible to remove them. In addition, they have been known to corrode into the cylinder head, particularly if left in too long between removals. In such a situation, it is not unknown for a plug to snap below the hexagonal nut, leaving just the threaded portion (and the outer electrode) in the cylinder head. Ford has on occasion issued TSB reminding technicians to use the correct methods of installation
My experience (posted somwhere else too):

 

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wow...

what is regaping spark plugs and how you do it ?
What SoNiC said. You do the plugs in these cars sooner than 100K not because the plugs wear out but because they will get stuck in the engine if you don't loosen them.

Regapping the plugs... You'd just pull the plugs and adjust the gap between the two electrodes at the tip of the plug to be within spec. The gap tends to open up over time and you can adjust them.

Personally, I wouldn't bother. You can put all new plugs into the car for around $25, and you only do this every 2 or 3 years. Just change the plugs.
 

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If you are doing the whole work to remove the back spark plugs (it's not fun), there is no economical justification to reuse the old ones. Especially when good ones (Autolite XP)are really cheap on Amazon.
 

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Ford design of the spark plugs is prone to seizing the plugs in the block. The more time you let them in, the harder is to get them out.........................
I agree. Long lasting, double platinum spark plugs are a blessing and a curse. If left untouched for 10 years, they may freeze in the threads.

Long lasting antifreeze is the same. It's a blessing because I don't have to replace it for years. But it makes me not check coolant level and a leak can go undetected for a long time.
 

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PLugs tight

I agree. Long lasting, double platinum spark plugs are a blessing and a curse. If left untouched for 10 years, they may freeze in the threads.

Long lasting antifreeze is the same. It's a blessing because I don't have to replace it for years. But it makes me not check coolant level and a leak can go undetected for a long time.
I replaced my plugs, '01 with 111K and they were a bit tight. I was particularly careful to not pull too hard on the flex handle. They were tight all the way out due to crud in the threads. Back bank about .068" and fronts .058". Otherwise all looked clean and all the same on the insulator near the tip. Single platinum factory issue, day one. The back bank small wire tips were about gone. Thanks to reverse polarity on the coil pack back bank. DOHC engine.

On the Vulcan engine you have the problem with rust. Those should always have plated metal.

In the future, I would expect maybe 50K replace and use good antizeize. (i before e except after c, except when not) not too much so as to get it on the end of the threaded part and get it in the cylinder.

Good time to see if one cylinder or one bank looks different.

On my '03 I pulled the plugs, cleaned the threads, checked them for wear and color and put them back. Used car and Autolite XP-104. Ohmed the wires and all ok. Replaced the "no identification" coil pack with a FORD from the junk yard. I am sure Ford did not put a 'no name' coil on that car.

-chart-
 
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