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Im in Florida so the hot weather is a factor. I know the manual says 5W 20, but doesnt that seem a little thin? Or is my knowledge of Oil so limited that its actually thicker than 10W40 which I use for my Xplorer.

(sorry if this is a repost, i searched but couldnt find any related answers)


Thanks
Curtis
 

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The number before the W is the weight. a 5W is thinner than a 10W.


I usually use a 10W40 in the summer, and a 5W30 in the winter. Or I used to that is, before I went to Royal Purple Oil. The thin oil in the winter helps against cold starts. Thicker oil lubricates better.


I would go with a synthetic because it has a much higher breakdown temperature. But if you must use a fossil oil, use a 10W40, or a 20W50 if the car has high mileage.
 

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i use synthetic 5w20. i have an 01 bull with 50,000 miles and i live in mississippi. runs great and its hotter than 5 hells right now! brian
 

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5W20 is a pretty thin oil, but the newer engines are built with tighter tolerances (they say) so thicker oil shouldn't be necessary. The lightweight oil also helps gas mileage a bit.
Read the owner's manual; it says something about hot weather driving and the proper oil to use.
With the tighter tolerances (bearing clearances) I'd be a little wary of using a heavier oil than recommended; lubrication is critical as the engine is started, when the oil is still cold and it's too thick to flow properly.
 

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Wait, I thought that the first number indicates the viscosity of the oil when cold, and the latter number means the viscosity of the oil when it is hot. Hence, some Bull owners like to use 5w30 in the summer because the higher last number means the oil has a higher tolerance for high heat (from breaking down).

I've also read that synthetic varieties of the same oil ratings are thinner than their dino oil counterparts, so some people have used thicker synthetic oils without any issues...
 

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Sablewagon is right, look in the owners manual. If the owners manual calls for 5W-20, use 5W-20. The engineers designed these engines to use certain oils for certain reasons. Most of the oil companies sell 5W-20 now so it should be easy to find. Wal-Mart has the Motorcraft semi-synthetic 5W-20 for only a couple bucks a quart. If you want a synthetic, Mobil 1 is available in a 0W-20 which meets/exceeds the Ford specs for 5W-20. Problems with oils being too thin were a concern when engines weren't built with the tight tolerances that they are built with today...Is there any production car that has been built in the last 10 years that has called for using something like 10W-40, 20W-50 or even 10W-30? I remember my '87 T-Bird calling for 5W-30, except for hot weather when it called for 10W-30, but that was an '87...

In addition, using the correct oil is especially important while your car is under warranty. If something goes wrong and there's even the remotest possibility of the oil being the blame for the problem, Ford Motor Company will void the warranty in a heartbeat if it finds out the wrong oil has been used.
 

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I wouldn't put 5w20 in any car. Way too thin when hot. This is done in the US/Canada markets. Other wise Ford recommends 5w30 for the exact same motors overseas.

I would like to see some motors with 130k on them and running 5w20 the entire time.
 

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the big question is this, does your car really care if its 70 or 98 degrees outside? your coolant thermostat and cars computer regulates the internal engine running temp once its wormed up as long as your car cooling system is working properly. The only problem is sub zero starting temp that would require very thin oil. based on the article that Silvapain posted the closer the numbers the less polymers and more lubricant. There for if you could find oil that 10W20 that might be the best bet. Dodge
recommended straight 30w oil for its cars all the way up to the mid 80s. I think ideally a straight weight with a block heater would be the best. But who wants to plug there car into a outlet every day to keep the sump worm?
 

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Believe me when pushing your car it is much better at 70F the 98F. While going up the mountains or diruving in the desert at 90F temps the engine and tranny both work much harder and get much hotter. No way would I use the 20 weight oil when my oil temps get around 230F or above.

Personally I use a 0w30 oil that does not use any polymers go get its weight spread.
 

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I am with SHOZ123, I use 0W-30 down here in South Florida. Just make sure it is full synthetic and you will be fine. Amsoil is the oldest synthetic oil company so they know what they are doing. :D
 

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http://www.mpt.org/motorweek/goss/2313.shtml

The link above has some interesting information about the weight of oil used in NASCAR...

Using the 0W-20, 0W-30, 5W-20, or 5W-30 aren't all that different from one another as far as weight/viscosity...The 10W stuff just seems to be a bit too heavy I would think for any modern engine...Then again, this debate probably could go on and on...
 

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5w-20 oil 42K miles current Taurus, 33K miles '01 Windstar, 40K miles '00 Taurus; no problems. All cars bought new, live in Palm Beach area, no problems.

I'll continue using the oil recommended by Ford, let you know if I have any problems.
 

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Ford desighned these motors around 5w-20. And that comes from Ford memos to Ford maintenance (ie. Quality Care) facilities. So I used 5w-20 until Mobil 1 came out with a full synthetic oil formulated for Fords. Now I use the Mobil 1 0w-20. And Ill let you know how it does at 130,000 miles. In my opinion Ford knows better what the engine they desighned should run on than what certain others think.

Oh,it will be about 112 here tomorrow.
 

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IMHO I wouldn't use 5w20 to oil my door hinges. Tell me all you newer Ford motor owners, does you owners manual forbid the use of any other weights?
 

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As mentioned before, the use of 5w20 is for improved fuel economy. Given that most modern cars' engines can easily see 200K miles with minimal maintenance, I think Ford and other companies have finally realized that they can sell more cars if they drive up the fuel mileage number, and it doesn't really matter what condition the engine is in at say 150K miles. The person who is driving the car with 150K miles on it is usually not the same person that goes out and buys a new Ford every 3-5 years.

In the SHO, I usually use Mobil One 5W30 in warmer weather, and Mobil One 0W30 from November through February. I'm changing my oil this afternoon and using Valvoline SynPower 5W30. They were out of Mobil One 5W30 and there is no way 10Wanything is going in any of my newer cars. Besides, according to AMSoil tests, Valvoline SynPower is a good runner-up to AMSoil.

The SLO gets Castrol GTX 5W30. The Falcon gets Castrol Hi-Mileage 10W30.

Of course, my cars don't do too much time in the South, so this post is void.
 
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