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2000 Taurus SE/ Vulcan. 80k miles.

Introduced approx 5 oz. of Seafoam via the PCV line. Hardest part was finding something to fit in the line to use as a funnel. Finally used a squirt top off hydraulic jack oil bottle. Hooked 2 foot section of hose in place of the PCV. Had to have my wife keep gassing it, wouldn't stay running without hooked up to the PCV. Slowly poured in the 5oz of Seafoam and you could hear it in the manifold and the car wanted to die. Started spewing smoke just before the 5oz was in. Had my wife kill it and let it sit for about 15 minutes. Started it up and it put out a good smoke screen for about 15 seconds. Was a little hard to get running at first. I was kind of disappointed, I was expecting much more smoke.

May just be my imagination, but it seems that about 5 minutes into the drive after, it seemed to run smoother and have better throttle response.

Added the remaining 11oz. to the gas tank. I keep meticulous MPG records with a identical drive constantly. We'll see if this has any effect on my mileage.

Now, if I could just get that serp belt replaced.
 

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Wonder if you're SES light with come on for your O2 sensors...many people have told me that Seafoam will foul O2 sensors.

If it works for you, I might be a little more inclined to use it, but I'd like to see what Bob, Ron Porter, or Brad think of it first.

JR
 
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IMHO, these products seem like a waste of time. If it works, and is documented (since MPG recordsa re kept this is a good case), then I'll take my words back.
 

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A question born of ignorance: What exactly is this stuff supposed to do? What's in it?
 

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You introduce the stuff into your engine through a PCV hose, and it runs through your intake manifold, LIM, including secondaries (for those of us lucky enough to have them), combustion chambers, exhaust valves, etc, and basically strips all the nasty carbon build-up off the metal. From what I've heard and seen, it works well, but I wouldn't want to stick it in my engine without having someone like Bob sign off on it. IIRC, it's fairly cheap and supposedly produces good results for the money. The smoke is all the carbon and crap being burned up and pushed out the tailpipes. As I mentioned before, I've heard of this stuff killing O2 sensors...

JR
 

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You want smoke use Transmission fluid, and it works just as good as the name brand stuff. You can also use water, but water has no lubricating properties like trans fluid.

Quote:"You introduce the stuff into your engine through a PCV hose, and it runs through your intake manifold, LIM, including secondaries (for those of us lucky enough to have them), combustion chambers, exhaust valves, etc, and basically strips all the nasty carbon build-up off the metal."

EXACTly... cleans carbon. old school hod rodders have been doing this for ages...BEFORE the "gunk, berrymans ,etc..."
 
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duratecchie had some of this stuff the last time he came down, and honestly it looks to be nothing more than Marvel Mystery oil, with some sort of solvent mixed with it.

I'll elaborate a little on why I don't like this stuff. This is especially important tho those with Tecs or SHO's, since the secondary side valves area always pretty carboned up. There's at least on known case of engine failure on a V8 SHO due to someone using a procedure like this (not Seafoam, something else I can't remember) and knocking carbon free from the valves. The carbon chunks plugged up the oil return passages in the head, and the rest is history.

I figger if my car still runs, better to leave the carbon where it is.
 
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Bob is right (when is he not) This Seafoam stuff may clean the engine and IM, but IMHO I know that come carbon build up is there to keep your car running good.... it's hard to explain, but if the carbon is there and you're running great... then leave it be.


Sal
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well, my Vulcan wasn't running that great.

I had a severe pinging issue with the car, no matter what grade gas I used. Last night, I was driving up a grade where the car always pings, and it didn't last night.

Granted, it will take time before the results are known. This car has been meticulously maintained. Has had Mobil 1 since 5k miles with occassional oil analysis. I have used good quality gas and occasional additives (Techron, Fuel Power).

I am trying to keep the car in as good as condition as possible. We plan on selling this car in about a year with around 100k miles and buy a van that's easier for the family.

This car has definately been better in it's later years. I recently had to replace the EGR valve, but that's about it besides routine maintenance. It had three trasmissions and four sets of rotors in the first 30k miles. Good car, but has been problematic. It averages about 23-25 mpg now with a 60 mile one way interstate commute.

I'll keep y'all posted of any positives/ negatives.
 

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Originally posted by Bob Gervais@Sep 15 2004, 02:43 AM
There's at least on known case of engine failure on a V8 SHO due to someone using a procedure like this (not Seafoam, something else I can't remember) and knocking carbon free from the valves. The carbon chunks plugged up the oil return passages in the head, and the rest is history.
I don't want to contradict Teh Bob, but if you think about it, how does a piece of carbon from the combustion path get into the lubricating system? Seems to me they'd be totally separate.
 

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alot of dodge dakota guys use seafoam on the magnum engines b/c they sludge up and alot of them have awesome results from using it. But they pour it struts down the tb into the intake manifold and into the cylinders so that if anything comes lose it gets burned in the combustion chambers. I would use it on a dohc motor just due to the fact there's too many moving parts that could be adversely affected. But on a pushrod motor I think it would be ok if you ran into the intake manifold and not the valve covers
 

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"The carbon chunks plugged up the oil return passages in the head, and the rest is history." how can this be? oil is not near the intake to be able to break off and plug something up.
 

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the chuncks are not really IN the combustion chamber, but on the valve stem, and when broke loose they fall through the valve spring and into the oiling system, thats how it gets inthe oildrain back passages in the head.
 

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Originally posted by rudedog@Mar 19 2005, 01:21 AM
the chuncks are not really IN the combustion chamber, but on the valve stem, and when broke loose they fall through the valve spring and into the oiling system, thats how it gets inthe oildrain back passages in the head.
That still makes no sense. You can't just push stuff through the valve train into the head. The tolerances are way too tight for any "chunks" to make it into the head. I'd be more inclined to believe that a very small "chunk" made it around the piston rings and into the oil pan, but even then, you'd need many thousands of these microscopic chunks to be able to clog an oil passage, and they'd all need to get to the same spot in the oiling system simultaneously. If there was a true threat here, then we'd all be subject to constant engine destruction due to carbon that regularly flakes off of the piston crown and valves everytime we hit the gas and go high rpm.

20 years rebuilding motors and this is the first time I've ever heard of an engine succumbing to loose carbon in the oiling system. The only issues I've ever seen with carbon are:

1) To much carbon buildup can cause valves to not seat properly. Symptoms are power loss and low cylinder pressure. Excessive buildup can cause the valve to seat so far out that it may strike the piston, or the cam can become damaged due to slapping induced by loose valvetrain.

2) Piston striking the head or valves due to excessive carbon buildup.
 

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Originally posted by FlamingTaco@Mar 19 2005, 05:36 AM
That still makes no sense. You can't just push stuff through the valve train into the head. The tolerances are way too tight for any "chunks" to make it into the head.

20 years rebuilding motors and this is the first time I've ever heard of an engine succumbing to loose carbon in the oiling system. The only issues I've ever seen with carbon are:

1) To much carbon buildup can cause valves to not seat properly. Symptoms are power loss and low cylinder pressure. Excessive buildup can cause the valve to seat so far out that it may strike the piston, or the cam can become damaged due to slapping induced by loose valvetrain.
I am not a professional engine builder nor do I play one on tv. I have stayed in several Holiday Inn Expresses though.

I have built probably a hundred engines in the last 25 years mostly Chebbys but some four and six cylinder engines and damn near anything can get through the intake past the valves and into the cylinders.

I had the bolt that holds the air cleaner to the carb go thru the valvetrain into the cylinder and get grabbed by a piston.

I have also seen rags get sucked through the valve train get into the cylinder and get caught by the piston ring.

I am sure a carbon chunk can get down there and bust a piston land or ring.


Also the carobon build up on a valve will create extra heat which will cause a "burnt" valve. Misalignment of a valve will cause a valve to wear thin which will put more heat on the "sharp" edge of the valve and cause it to burn.

Loose debris will clog oil return gallies and starve the engine of oil.

One constant thing about working on anything mechanical.
Weird **** can happen in just about any circumstance.

Back in the day we used to do the same thing with water. Used to get a pop bottle of it and pour it down the carb. It would steam and clean the engine. I only did it in worst case scenarios because you ran the risk of breaking somethng loose and ruining an engine.

Mike
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Originally posted by rudedog@Mar 19 2005, 01:21 AM
the chuncks are not really IN the combustion chamber, but on the valve stem, and when broke loose they fall through the valve spring and into the oiling system, thats how it gets inthe oildrain back passages in the head.
What Rudy said.

I guess there's maybe a handful or so of us that know the inner workings of an engine.
 

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Originally posted by Bob Gervais@Mar 19 2005, 10:01 AM
I guess there's maybe a handful or so of us that know the inner workings of an engine.
I absolutely disagree. I, and probably several others here, can talk engine theory all day.

What I don't have is time logged rebuilding 100 engines.
 

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Originally posted by sfontain@Mar 19 2005, 10:47 AM
What I don't have is time logged rebuilding 100 engines.
Was that a shot at me?

Mike
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Personally, I have used this product and can vouch for it when used in a gas tank as an additive/cleaner.

I use a can in my tank every oil change, and it seems to work. On the back of the can there are instructions to use it in the manner firescooby did. Im not sure if this works cause I have never tried it that way.

Thats all i know.

-DC
 
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