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Discussion Starter #1
Okay So last night just after I turned a corner my car started wobbling badly. Not knowing what it was I immediately stop and jack the car up on the drivers side since I know the bearing or ball joint are worn. Well, I pulled on the wheel and such and there was no additional movement other than what I knew of already. Jacked the drivers side up, pulled on the wheel and it sorta moved, so knowing this side was very tight, I started takin the wheel off. take the centre cap off, and i hear something moving. Remove the centre cap and find 3 broken stud bolts. I hadn't put one of the lugnuts back on, and one was still there. so I put a lug nut on the other one and drove home
With only two lugnuts I lucked out they were right across from eachother.

Replacement

Replacement parts ranged in price from $1.55 up to $7.43 cdn per stud.

According to Chiltons steps are as follows

Engage parking break
Jack car up,
Support Car
Remove wheel (in some cases this step might not actually be neccessary lol)
Remove brake caliper
Remove rotor (on my 1990 it just slides off you may need to unbolt others)

Reason I'd remove the rotor is depending on where they are broke, removal will be easier, and so when your usin a hammer or what ever you don't accidently hit it.
Remove broken studs

To remove the old studs I used a sledge hammer, but not making full swings obviously. I think this would take a very very long time with a regular hammer.
Put the car in neutral so you can turn the hub, this is necessary because the you can only get a full sized stud out in one spot so turning is necessary. I suggest changing the whole set because they are cheap and for piece of mind.

When installing the new ones, slide all the new studs in one by one, then put the rotor back on. You are able to press them in by using a lug nut which pulls them in tight. However, if you do not put the rotor back on you will strip the little teeth on the stud and it will spin freely. The manual does not say to put the rotor back on, so I didn't do it. I ended up having three of them strip a bit before they were fully pressed in. However after I got the lug nuts off I put the rotor on and was able to snug them in all the way nice and tight.

After they are pressed in obviously you reinstall the caliper, then put the wheel back on. Just thought I would do a write up since it wasn't as easy as I thought goin by the intstructions in the book.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
hey this should be in the how to section.

btw, I have to do this again!! not sure why, but same circumstances, I was missing one lug nut on the same wheel, and three out of the four that were on broke. So now I will fix them again, I think this is a sign that that wheel bearing on the passenger side is binding. Or could this be from only having four out of the 5 lug nuts on? I can't see that being the reason, or maybe the y were over tightened, or under tightend and the wheel wobbled them into breaking. I don't know for 100% sure if i did have them tightened properly... and I never really noticed a wobble, well I did here and there but I always had a wobble.
 

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Replacing the wheel studs in simple. I lost 6 of them due to a damn tire place using a massive air tool to tighten mine. All you have to do in the front tires ONLY is: remove tire, remove two 12mm bolts on caliper, remove caliper, remove two 15 MM bolts on caliper bracket, remove rotor, line up the stud you want removed with the OPEN area on the back look and you'll see what I mean, knock busted stud out with a hammer, take new stud and slide into hole, knock it back in place with hammer CAREFULLY, if it doesn't go all the way in when you tighten the lugs it will pull it the rest of the way, reinstall in reverese order
 

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We had this discussion earlier with another member having stud replacement. To install the new stud it, you can use an open ended lug nut and screw the nut in the stud until it seats itself.
 

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Originally posted by Zeptoplix@Jun 11 2005, 04:06 AM
hey this should be in the how to section.

btw, I have to do this again!! not sure why, but same circumstances, I was missing one lug nut on the same wheel, and three out of the four that were on broke.  So now I will fix them again, I think this is a sign that that wheel bearing on the passenger side is binding.  Or could this be from only having four out of the 5 lug nuts on?  I can't see that being the reason, or maybe the y were over tightened, or under tightend and the wheel wobbled them into breaking.  I don't know for 100% sure if i did have them tightened properly... and I never really noticed a wobble, well I did here and there but I always had a wobble.
Zep,

You should be able to get a decent HUB with all the studs intact, with ABS in a junkyard for about $35.

The size of the wrench that holds the nut on that holds the hub on is 36mm, and some stores (autozone around me) carry a socket that size, but they call it an "axle socket". It cost me around $17 for the socket.

Hope this helps.

-Damon
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I have the socket already. And thanks for the two people who chimed in with instructions telling me how to, when the first post was by me explaining how to do it, lol

Damon, I think the junkyard here wants $50 for that. I do not need an abs specific hub, i have a 1990 and it wasn't standard equipment.

I replaced them all again. It was simple like the first time i did it, and it only cost $9

I am wondering what could be causing this, I mean this is twice it has happened, however both times ironically, I was missing a lug nut, and then three others broke while I Was missing one (the stud was there, it just wasn't fasteneD)
 

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You said 3 broke and one fell out. IN auto tech we had to do this and we had to use an impact wrench to get them on properly. I'd say one fell out cause it probably wasn't in all the way. And the three that broke was probably due to the lack of being properly secured(the wheels. So at the turn the wheels kept trying to go straight and nearly sucedded. We did this on a Jeep and they continually fell out until we used an impact wrench.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Umm o where did i see that i said one fell out... What difference does it make if you pull it all the way through with a wrench to seat it, or with an impact wrench? none... it would just be easier with an impact
 

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If there is dirt or rust on the rotor surface (where it contacts the wheel), you might have that.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Ahh Digger, that makes alot more sense now for sure!!
what would cause that? them being slightly worn down at the contact point?

And what the heck is that? :postwhore: :headscratch:
 

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Sorry, a couple other people posted before I got mine in, so it made no sense. :pat:

Any type of irregularity in the surfaces could (conceivably) result in the nuts loosening. Dirt, a damaged rim, whatever. Is it the same wheel as the last time it happened?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Well i took the car to a shop today and asked them to check the front wheel bearing for binding. The mechanic test drove and then looked at it and said he didn't hear/feel any symptoms to prove it was binding, and checked the wheel it self for play and found nothing..

He did suggest, that since my wheels are not for my car, that the centre ring that the rim fits around takes some stress off the studs, and since my wheels are not stock, the full brunt of the stress goes to the wheel studs.. If i am not making any sense, I will try and take a picture of it... so now he can only think that i might be over torquing, or under torquing the lug nuts.. they are torqued properly right now..
 

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It makes sense. If it is the wrong type of rim, using the correct torque may not help. You will have to check them periodically.
 
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