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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wondering what my best options are for replacing my steel lines from my distribution block up front, all the way to the rear wheels? Both my lines rusted out just under the drivers door and halfway past the rear door as they run down to the rear. They are "protected" by a plastic shield which creates a trap for salt sand and moisture to do it's damage. I'm sure this is so common for anyone in snowy regions.

I tried replacing a 36" section with some steel lines and a double flare kit and some unions, but I always have a hard time getting a good flare with these cheezy flare kits and ended up snapping the pin on the darn tool. :angry:
I got fed up and luckly I got a decient flare on the two lines coming from the front, and after another frusterated trip to the parts store, I decided to buy another 12" section and bend it into a U shape and "isolate the rears"
Yea I know not too cool or safe, but I needed transportation and now I want to really fix it. So all I can find at the parts store is a maximum of 60" steel lines and I would need a couple of sections and more unions.

Has anyone replaced these with a OE Ford line and what do they run $ ?

I found a plastic line kit at Northern Tool here:
Tie-Down Single-Axle Brake Line Kit | Misc. Brake Accessories | Northern Tool + Equipment

anyone ever tried it?
 

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Wondering what my best options are for replacing my steel lines from my distribution block up front, all the way to the rear wheels? Both my lines rusted out just under the drivers door and halfway past the rear door as they run down to the rear. They are "protected" by a plastic shield which creates a trap for salt sand and moisture to do it's damage. I'm sure this is so common for anyone in snowy regions.

I tried replacing a 36" section with some steel lines and a double flare kit and some unions, but I always have a hard time getting a good flare with these cheezy flare kits and ended up snapping the pin on the darn tool. :angry:
I got fed up and luckly I got a decient flare on the two lines coming from the front, and after another frusterated trip to the parts store, I decided to buy another 12" section and bend it into a U shape and "isolate the rears"
Yea I know not too cool or safe, but I needed transportation and now I want to really fix it. So all I can find at the parts store is a maximum of 60" steel lines and I would need a couple of sections and more unions.

Has anyone replaced these with a OE Ford line and what do they run $ ?

I found a plastic line kit at Northern Tool here:
Tie-Down Single-Axle Brake Line Kit | Misc. Brake Accessories | Northern Tool + Equipment

anyone ever tried it?
Those lines are designed for trailers. They have a bit of stretch when pressurized and will probably result in a softer pedal. As the owner of a boat trailer used in salt water I can attest to the only true solution -stainless steel lines. I installed them on the trailer and that was the end of the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I just asked a guy at work who races dirt oval track to see if he had ever heard or plastic lines. He said yes some guys run them for weight savings!

So I googled it and ran across this:
PRPSR202 PRP Plastic Brake Line Kit - No Brake Bias Gauges - Performance Bodies Stock Car Bodies & Parts

Push to connect fittings, cut with razor blade to length, sounds cool. DOT Rating? I'm not seeing one listed on the ad, no NASCAR rating either. :p

I guess one could argue that for track use and all the safety gear and roll cages aside, race car drivers are better protected in case of a failure. I wouldn't think that these guys would tolerate a spongy pedal.

Interesting as well is that when I googled around I find allot of the SST braded flex brake lines are in fact Teflon tube with a SST braid.








 
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