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Discussion Starter #1
Anyway of getting a replacement ignition lock cyclinder that matches my key?

I have a Ford Taurus 1991 6cyl 3.0L.

I am looking on the RockAuto site. They have five MotoCraft ignition locks to pick from.
Could it be that there were only five key types? How do I know which one to pick? I have my old cylinder out. How do I match the number on it to the cylinder that I need?

MOTORCRAFT Part # SW2398 {#F3DZ11582C, F5DB11582CB}
Number 3 Cut Letter C (Only 3 Remaining)

MOTORCRAFT Part # SW2399 {#F3DZ11582D, F5DB11582DB}
Number 4 Cut Letter D

MOTORCRAFT Part # SW2396 {#F3DZ11582A, F5DB11582AB}
Number 1 Cut Letter A

MOTORCRAFT Part # SW2397 {#F3DZ11582B, F5DB11582BB}
Number 2 Cut Letter B

MOTORCRAFT Part # SW2400 {#F3DZ11582E, F5DB11582EB}
Number 5 Cut Letter E (Only 2 Remaining)

Thanks.

Robert
 

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The only way to get one that matches your key is to build it or have a locksmith do it. You're going to have to do the same with the Motorcraft cylinders sold on Rock Auto anyway. On Ford keys, the first three pins are only used by the ignition cylinder. The lock cylinders don't use them, they only use the last five pins. Those first three pins are what the key codes refer to, as they are matched to the ignition cylinder. If you look at the picture of the assembly, you'll notice that only the first three pins are cut on the keys.



edit: (I may have the exact number of pins wrong, but the jist of it is correct. Hopefully LGBPOP will chime in as he's a locksmith.)
 

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The Ford 10-cut keying system introduced in mid-1984 and used through the late 1990s had - you guessed it - 10 cuts total on the key. Working from bow (what you hold in your hand) to tip, the first 6 cuts were used in the doors and the last six in the ignition. Thus, the two middle cuts (positions 5 and 6) were used for both.

Many replacement ignitions leave a wafer out in position 6, so by knowing what your existing #5 cut is - there are five possible depths of cut - you can buy the corresponding ignition and have a locksmith duplicate your existing door cuts to the new keys and you end up with one key working everything as before.

Post a photo of your existing key, I probably could tell you which one to get. I've done hundreds of them.
 
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Please - humor me. I asked for a pic of the key - all of it. I do not need a ruler interfering with things. Also would help if it was in focus. That's the critical part, if I', going to sight-read the key. Sorry.:(

Alternatively, what is it you have that you say is the key code? For that vintage, it should be three numerals, followed by a letter (A thru E) followed by three more numerals...for example, 425D311. The letter alone is what indicates the overlap cut, but post the entire code so I can check it in my database.
 

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Why do you need a new cylinder in the first place? Is it because you don't need the key anymore to start the car. I had that problem on my 1993 and the cylinder just needed a good cleaning and lube.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
I have a key code of 1xxxyyy.

I've never had much luck at taking a close up picture. The picture looks OK in the LCD display, but doesn't come out as good in actual picture.

I could not get the key out of the ignition.

Robert
 

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Why do you need a new cylinder in the first place? Is it because you don't need the key anymore to start the car. I had that problem on my 1993 and the cylinder just needed a good cleaning and lube.
That's a sign of gross negligence and/or appalling lack of maintenance. Obviously, someone who was clueless about basic maintenance owned that car for a long time before you assumed ownership of it.

Most 10-cut ignition replacements are effected not by failure of the lock itself - with regular lubrication using TriFlo, SuperSlick or even WD-40, an OEM ignition can last 200,000 miles - but because the staking on the large ears of the 1989-1998 ignitions that holds the eared face cover to the lock plug gradually works loose. It begins to turn without a key inserted...not that the lock is turning, just the face cover turns. In extreme-wear situations the face cover will rotate 360° and this problem has been known to cut keys in half with sufficient force applied.

Cheapskate locksmiths and mechanics will drill a hole parallel to the keyway and insert a roll pin to stop the face cover rotation. I'd rather do the job right and replace the cylinder. It costs more in wasted time effecting a repair that lasts five years at best, than to replace a $22 lock cylinder and be done with it.
 

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I have a key code of 158A517.

I've never had much luck at taking a close up picture. The picture looks OK in the LCD display, but doesn't come out as good in actual picture.

I could not get the key out of the ignition.

Robert
Most times, if the key can't be removed it's because the lock is not in the OFF/REMOVE position. The face cover ears may be loose and appear to be in that position...but the sidebar in the lockplug has to be lined up with its slot to allow key removal. Try turning the key itself, not using the ears. Use needle-nosed pliers if necessary to turn the key to the proper position.

I'm not going out to the van at the moment to look up the entire code, but the letter A denotes a #1 depth of cut (or no cut at all on a key blank) in position 5 on your key. Get a replacement ignition with that particular cut depth in that position, and have a locksmith transfer your existing door cuts to the new ignition keys. $5-6 ought to do it at the locksmith's after you have bought the lock; buy the lock from a locksmith and he/she is likely to do the cutting as part of the purchase price. ASP is a good aftermarket brand, most locksmiths use them. Motorcraft obviously is good, albeit pricey. I don't know enough about BWD (Borg-Warner) to pass judgment.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Don't stress yourself. I can wait. I got stressed with having to leave the key in the car. There is no reason to. The car has an electo lock too.

I got the lock cylinder out. In looking over the lock, two pins and a spring dropped out. I have know idea of where they came from. One of the pins I have "lost" in the car by now.

The car was near the ocean. Some white/blue crude was in the lock.

I have been able to do the repair so far myself. It's the first time for a car lock. Can not expect perfection.

It's all an experiment anyway.

The car has always had a problem with off. You had to stop a little before turning the lock all the way the key would go in the lock direction. If you turned all the way, you would get the car ringer.

Robert
 

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Don't stress yourself. I can wait. I got stressed with having to leave the key in the car. There is no reason to. The car has an electo lock too.

I got the lock cylinder out. In looking over the lock, two pins and a spring dropped out. I have know idea of where they came from. One of the pins I have "lost" in the car by now.

The car was near the ocean. Some white/blue crude was in the lock.

I have been able to do the repair so far myself. It's the first time for a car lock. Can not expect perfection.

It's all an experiment anyway.

The car has always had a problem with off. You had to stop a little before turning the lock all the way the key would go in the lock direction. If you turned all the way, you would get the car ringer.

Robert
If I did a lock, I would remove all pins and forget it. No one will know. If they want to steal it, that would not prevent anything.

Just my op.

-chart-
 

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That lock has wafer tumblers and microsprings for the actual sidebar locking operation. The only "pins and springs" that would come out of that lock are the detent pins/springs which reside in the outer half-shell. If you got that lock apart that far, and you grenaded it to that point, I suggest giving up - hire someone to do something for you who knows what they are doing, and pay them fairly for the work. What you have is a lock that came apart that shouldn't have done so. If that's an accident, you need someone there who knows what they are doing.


I wish you the best.
 

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Don't stress yourself. I can wait. I got stressed with having to leave the key in the car. There is no reason to. The car has an electo lock too.

I got the lock cylinder out. In looking over the lock, two pins and a spring dropped out. I have know idea of where they came from. One of the pins I have "lost" in the car by now.

The car was near the ocean. Some white/blue crude was in the lock.

I have been able to do the repair so far myself. It's the first time for a car lock. Can not expect perfection.

It's all an experiment anyway.

The car has always had a problem with off. You had to stop a little before turning the lock all the way the key would go in the lock direction. If you turned all the way, you would get the car ringer.

Robert
Just a little info to help you out. At least on the same year Ford truck, it uses pins and springs and not wafers. Too bad it wasn't a new lock because Rock Auto sells a rekey kit with all the wafers you need. Looks like mine on a 2006 Taurus has wafers. They don't seem to do that with the pin type. If you are just experimenting here, I would grab a JY cylinder of the same year and then study the You tube video attached. If you had the tumbler pins and springs it could be a simple transfer from your old lock to your new one. If you cant find the one maybe you can file down one to match. And if it does have wafers maybe you could transfer the wafers. I would try it just for fun, a few bucks and a couple of hours. If anything you get a better understanding of how these locks work.

 

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Exalted Grand Poobah
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If someone managed to put a five-pin lock into a ten-cut housing there's something radically wrong. The only five-pin lock ever used in the Gen1 Taurus was in the trunk lid or liftgate. The Taurus never used a pin-tumbler ignition. Photos below are of an old ignition from my '90 (basically the same car as the '91). It comes apart easily with a working key, just turn 180° and the plug comes right out of the shell - exposing those two pins and springs. Easy enough to do when not expecting it. Sorry if I was a bit harsh, rccharles! Anyhow, I highlighted the pin/spring location in the photos.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Had my Taurus in the shop.

Found lock out brushes were out of alignment in the steering column. :eek: This, was preventing me from pulling out the key.


Robert
 

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This is a great thread, and BIG thanks to Lgbpop for all the info!!

I was just about to start a thread on my 1995 Ignition lock: the face cover ears turn freely as discussed above: I dismantled a lock in the junk yard and saw that the little pins that locate the face cover ears shear off. I now know that I can solve this problem with a new lock barrel!

I'm going to re-read the info on the key cuts when it isn't 1:30 in the morning :D
 
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