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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
want to replace rear brake pads and rotors on my 2004 wagon; this is a big job for me but they want an arm and a leg to do it at the shops - i've never done brakes before. I watched my front ones done recently and I've reviewed wiki and some forum posts and reviewed my shop manual.

Quests:
1) many types of lubes and things are recommended in various places: caliper grease, antiseize on bolts, brake cleaner on various items, pb blaster or crc 656 to loosen bolts; etc... what is adviseable really for me to prepurchase in case i need it and how would i use it?
2) there is mention of a special tool for the caliper (on rear taurus with pads) that is required beyond just a c clamp - can anyone elaborate? is it used only on the rear - i do not remember any tool used on front - even not a c clamp.
3) some places say to remove brake fluid reservoir cap; some don't. some say bleed, some don't - what is adviseable?
4) i do not already own a torque wrench; do i really need to use a torque wrench for replacement of caliper?
5) any other hints/ideas

Thanks so much !!!
 

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1) many types of lubes and things are recommended in various places: caliper grease, antiseize on bolts, brake cleaner on various items, pb blaster or crc 656 to loosen bolts; etc... what is adviseable really for me to prepurchase in case i need it and how would i use it?
For slider pins, use only proper brake lubricant, do not use anti-seize to lubericate the sliders. You can use anti-seize on the caliper bolt and caliper bracket bolts. Also putting anti-seize on the hub only, not the wheel studs will facilitate future removal of the rotor. You may need a hammer to give the old on a crack or two to free it up. Not always, but sometimes they stick.

2) there is mention of a special tool for the caliper (on rear taurus with pads) that is required beyond just a c clamp - can anyone elaborate? is it used only on the rear - i do not remember any tool used on front - even not a c clamp.
There is a special tool for rear calipers. The reason is because they do not just push in like the front calipers. They need to be pressed and turned at the same time. Also while I think of it, there is a proportioning valve (or should be) on the driver's side rear. Jack the wheel up as to open the valve, it really will facilitate pressing the pistons back in. The valve has a rod that attaches to the rear control arm. The picture for the cheapest tool is at the bottom and it does a decent job for what it's worth. You just find the two prong that fit into the rear piston and while turning the piston with a rachet you press as well.

3) some places say to remove brake fluid reservoir cap; some don't. some say bleed, some don't - what is adviseable?
You don't have to do any of that. You only need to bleed if you were say replacing a brake line, caliper, wheel cylinder, something that opens the system up to air. What you're doing does not. The only other time you would bleed the lines is if you were doing a flush to the brake fluid.

4) i do not already own a torque wrench; do i really need to use a torque wrench for replacement of caliper?
I've never torqued anything on the brakes, just by feel. However you will want to torque your wheels, so it would be a good idea to invest in one.

5) any other hints/ideas
Just take your time if you're uncertain. Also do one side at a time. This goes more with drum brakes, but it may help. That way you can see how things properly go and should be. Make sure you clean where the pads sit and add a little brake lube to allow then to slide and be free. Other then that it's really straight forward. If you have any questions or get stuck on something, take a break and post your question here. Someone I'm sure will help you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks so much for the tips. This all went smoothly; I did recruit a little help from someone more experienced.
 
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