Taurus Car Club of America : Ford Taurus Forum banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
<div align="center">STEP-BY-STEP REPLACEMENT OF REAR STRUT ASSEMBLIES

As I promised a few weeks ago, here are my step-by-step procedures for replacing the rear strut assemblies on a GenIV Taurus Sedan. I would rate the project as a competent beginner to intermediate level job and anyone with the tools, patience, and basic mechanical know-how should be able to pull this off (If I can do it, so can you!). Here we go:

TOOLS USED

1) 3/8" & 1/2" Ratchets
2) Various Metric and SAE Sockets
3) Breaker Bar
4) Cresent wrench
5) Large flathead screwdriver
6) 13mm box-end wrench
7) Propane torch
8) Hammer & wood blocks
9) Jack, car-stands, ramps
10) Probably some other miscellaneous items

PARTS LIST

1) (2) Strut Assemblies (I used Monroe Quick Struts)
2) (2) Stabilizer Bar to strut link bushing kits (optional)
3) (2) Tension Bar to Spindle Bushing Kits (optional)
4) (2) New strut to spindle pinch bolts (optional)
5) Tube of anti-seize
6) Can of PB Blaster

REMOVAL STEPS

a) Soak all nuts and bolts in PB Blaster at least a day in advance (even more works better)
B) Remove rear seats and parcel shelf to access the Upper Strut Mounts (see picture below)

[attachmentid=19720]

c) Loosen but don't remove the 3 - Upper Strut Mount Nuts (see pic below).

[attachmentid=19721]

d) Safely jack and support vehicle
e) Remove the bolts and nuts holding the strut to the spindle. The pinch bolt is a bear! Use lots of PB Blaster and heat if needed. (see picture below)

[attachmentid=19722]

f) Use a block of wood and a hammer to coax the spindle down off the strut. Make sure to support the spindle with something so you don't put too much pressure on the brake hoses and tension bar. With the strut free from the spindle, remove the (3) upper strut mounting nuts and remove the strut assembly from the car. Here's what you end up with:

[attachmentid=19723]

INSTALLATION STEPS

g) Remove the stablizer link from the old strut, install new bushing kit (optional), and install on new strut assembly.
h) Install new strut assembly into the strut tower and handtighten the (3) upper strut mount nuts.
i) Install and tighten the nuts and bolts for the strut to spindle (see picture below):

[attachmentid=19727]

j) The torque recommendations are from my Haynes manual. The installation sheet that comes from Monroe and with the struts has slightly different torque settings.
k) Install the new bushing kit for the tension bar to spindle (optional).
l) Install new pinch bolt (optional).
m) Once everything underneath the car is tightened down, you can finish torquing the (3) upper strut mount nuts and move on to the other side or reinstall the cars interior.

SOME LESSONS LEARNED

#1 Use PB Blaster and heat to help with stubborn nuts/bolts.
#2 The Pinch Bolt will be tough, especially if your car has alot of rust on the chassis.
#3 I found several steps in my Haynes manual to be unnecessary and I see no real reason for doing them. They are: a) Removing the brake proportioning valve bolts B) Remove the tension bar front nut...the back nut which connects to the spindle gives you plenty of sway to remove the strut.
#4 Since the time and labor to do this job are fairly intense, I recommend the optional bushing kist and pinch bolt replacement at the time of this job...not much expense and why chance it.
#5 I used anti-seize on all threads to help should I ever need to do this job again.
#6 Depending on how fast you work, plan on from 1 hour per side up to all afternoon. The second one will go much quicker than the first one... :mj_banana:
#7 My cost for the project was right around $250.00 total. I got a great deal on my Monroe Quick Struts ($210.00/pair) and the rest was bushing kits, etc.

I've learned so much from some of you that I wanted to give something back to the forum. I hope you find this How-to useful in some way. Feel free to add to it to make it better. These instructions could be easily adapted to just rear coilspring replacement, rear strut replacement, or using strut components instead of the already assembled Monroe Quick Strut.

Best wishes....

Mark
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,343 Posts
dang write up much? :D good one! :thumb:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Hi Wade,

I don't talk too much, so I guess I make up for it with my writing...lol! I grew up in NE Ohio...good people!

Take care...

Mark
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,543 Posts
Doesn't the seat cushion come out before the backrest?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,748 Posts
Write up. :thumb:
Wrong location. :thumbsdown:

Overall: :thumb: :thumb:

Did u ever use the Montroe AK50 and AK52 mount kits? I have those coming with front and rear Monroe Quickstruts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Good point!

I did it in reverse when I did it because it was the first time I had removed the rear seat and I didn't know any better :eek: . I didn't have any problem removing the (2) lower bolts with a deepwell 13mm socket and then popping the seat back up. Actually, I was able to remove the parcel shelf without even touching the rear seat (bottom portion). I then took everything out for 2 reasons: #1 to make more working room back there and #2 because I like to take things apart and see how they work... :D

The next time, I'll know to push in the lower rear seat to release it from the retainer clips and pop it right out. Then remove the 2 bolts and the rear seat back.

Thanks for the addition to the how-to...

Mark

fdogg96:

1) Where is the best place to post this?

2) I didn't need any adapter kits for my Monroe Quick Strut install...they were direct and complete replacements. Well engineered. I have a 2000 Taurus SE Sedan if that helps you any.

Mark
 

·
Don't Be Stupid
Joined
·
7,049 Posts
Write up. :thumb:
Wrong location. :thumbsdown:

Overall: :thumb: :thumb:

Did u ever use the Montroe AK50 and AK52 mount kits? I have those coming with front and rear Monroe Quickstruts. [/b]
This is a maintenance and repair writeup. Now if he was installing eibachs, that would go in the suspension forum, as it is technically for upgrades.



BTW: Wiki is almost done
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
Thanks for posting this. I was thinking of having a shop do the struts on my father's car, but this looks very DIY. How is the ride?...better?

Do you need to get an alignment done with the rears only?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
WIKI looks great...thanks 00tec-satx! Hopefully, some other forum members will get some benefit from it.

Tempest, go for it! It wasn't a very hard job -- it just took some time. The quotes I got around me ranged from $600-$800 for new rear strut assemblies complete job (parts and labor) down to $225.00 (labor only) to install my Quick Struts. Anytime I can save $225.00+ and know the job is done right...it's worth it to me. I picked one of the new Quick Struts up off eBay for $80 and the other was $130 from Rockauto (using the 5% discount code). Even if you get both from Rockauto, you're only looking at around $260 for the struts...I priced all the individual components to build my own Quick Struts (struts, coils, mounts, strut baffle, etc.) and it was MORE expensive to get the parts and build yourself then it was to just get the preassembled units.

The ride is awesome! No more SAS :banana: and the rear looks great! You can actually feel the ride height difference in the drivers seat and I had to change the seat position and mirrors to a new comfortable position...lol!

A wheel alignment is recommended and I'll probably take it in for all 4-wheel alignment here shortly. I like the ride so much that I'm thinking about doing the front pair soon (maybe another writeup?! LOL)

Good luck and feel free to ask if you have any more questions about the job!

Mark

00tec-satx:

I changed the 5th picture as I had labeled the bolts wrong (but you have the right one in the wiki). I also fixed a couple of misspellings near the end (monroe instead of monrow and kits instead of kist).

Thanks agan for doing the wiki!!!

Take care...

Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,748 Posts
WIKI looks great...thanks 00tec-satx! Hopefully, some other forum members will get some benefit from it.

Tempest, go for it! It wasn't a very hard job -- it just took some time. The quotes I got around me ranged from $600-$800 for new rear strut assemblies complete job (parts and labor) down to $225.00 (labor only) to install my Quick Struts. Anytime I can save $225.00+ and know the job is done right...it's worth it to me. I picked one of the new Quick Struts up off eBay for $80 and the other was $130 from Rockauto (using the 5% discount code). Even if you get both from Rockauto, you're only looking at around $260 for the struts...I priced all the individual components to build my own Quick Struts (struts, coils, mounts, strut baffle, etc.) and it was MORE expensive to get the parts and build yourself then it was to just get the preassembled units.

The ride is awesome! No more SAS :banana: and the rear looks great! You can actually feel the ride height difference in the drivers seat and I had to change the seat position and mirrors to a new comfortable position...lol!

A wheel alignment is recommended and I'll probably take it in for all 4-wheel alignment here shortly. I like the ride so much that I'm thinking about doing the front pair soon (maybe another writeup?! LOL)

Good luck and feel free to ask if you have any more questions about the job!

Mark

00tec-satx:

I changed the 5th picture as I had labeled the bolts wrong (but you have the right one in the wiki). I also fixed a couple of misspellings near the end (monroe instead of monrow and kits instead of kist).

Thanks agan for doing the wiki!!!

Take care...

Mark
[/b]

I got the following quotes to install both front and rear.

$1000-Ford Dealer
$500- Independent Ford specialist
$160-Independent mechanic
$200-Independent mechanic


Was the installation easy?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
fdogg96,

For a trained mechanic, with a lift, air tools, impact socket drivers, etc. I would say each strut would take probably 30minutes to do. My local shop quoted $225.00 to do the rear only and they said the book time showed 3 hrs. labor x $75/hr. = $225.00.

I did my rears in under 3 hours in my driveway, with no air tools or impact drivers (I wish I had one though for the pinch bolts...LOL!)

If the shops that quoted $100-150 are reputable, I'd say pay them to do all 4.

Good luck...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
89 Posts
msimon2000, thanks for the info and pics.

I just got my rears done and I must say it took me much longer than I had imagined. if I might add to the lessons learned:

A. I actually followed the haynes manual and took off the [forward] nut towards the front of the car on the tension rod. I had a difficult time trying to get the spindle off the tension rod. this was on the passenger side.

B. on the drivers side I didn't want to screw around with the forward nut on the tension rod as the parking brake cable was in the way. this was not fun as I had to push rearward on the drum/spindle BIG time to get it off....getting it back on I just couldn't do. a friend came over and wedged a pipe from the rear [of the center of drum] pointing upward bending CCW (again drivers side), hitting the bottom of the pipe on the hole/collar the tension rod entered and leveraging against (IIRC) the collar where the pinch bolt is[how's that for description and using what I think should be the correct names of parts]. while he did that he pushed rearward with his left knee on the drum and used his left hand to push the tension rod into the spindle. I really couldn't believe how easy he made it seem and it was done in 4 seconds. I also did the tension rod to spindle re-assembly without the strut/shock in place. I thought this might give it some more play.

C. I took off the stab bar to frame/body bolt completely out and wished I hadn't when trying to put everything back together. while I wished I could change out the stab bar and all that performance jazz I did this repair for cost reasons.

D. I did a rebuild of the strut assy. due to this repair resulting from a somewhat failed attempt of a garage repairing the springs [broken]. while they repaired the springs they failed to mention that it would basically only be a parts charge to replace the shock portion of the strut ($325 in parts and labor for spring change out). my shocks were blown and needed to be replaced after the work was done...hence my eagerness to tackle the DIY job. [I had a flapping/slapping sound coming from the rear when going over bumps at 20-40 MPH and knew something still wasn’t right…but that’s another story with the garage shop]

My first attempt to unscrew the upper main nut on the strut assy didn’t work....as I thought I had compressed the spring enough. This was due to a gap I found underneath the upper nut washer, but I didn’t realize that gap was there even before I had compressed the spring. Like everyone else who’s stated it, take caution when doing this as it can be dangerous. Unlike my case [where the springs have already been replaced] if you can do the entire strut assy replace do so (it's much cheaper to buy springs and shocks than the entire assy) if you don’t feel comfortable doing this type of breakdown and it will take less hours and be less painless.

E. I suggest torquing (sp?) the upper stab bar link nut on the shock prior to placing the strut assy. in the vehicle as there is almost no way to get a torque wrench in that area afterwards and it is damn hard to even get a deep well socket in there when it is attached to the vehicle. BUT I’m an engineer so I’m a stickler when it comes to specs 


Love the site and all the info I have gleaned from it and I must say a paypal donation is in order. Hope my comments help someone else. I just took the car out ‘around the block’ and love how it feels now…. Thinking of doing the fronts now.

Oh BTW mine is a 2000 merc sable with low miles [42K] and I think all my bolts were a bit loosened/easy to take off after the garage did work on the rear.

:ford:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Having just completed all for I can offer the following tip when reconnecting the stab bars. It helps greatly (if you don't connect it first) to connect the stab bar to the lower arm then, jack the strut up until the stab bar lines up with the hole. This way you will have room for your torque wrench and whatever else you need.

I had a nightmare of a replacement job, but all in all, I am glad I tackled it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
I saw your post and wonder if you can help me out?

I'm replacing my struts in my 1986 Gen 1 Taurus (with Monroe QuickStruts) and noticed my rear strut rod bushings should be replaced while I have the unit tore apart. I read that your car is a Gen 3, but you may have used simular parts

My question is re: replacement parts. I'm planning to use Moog parts K8649 (rod to spindle) and K8675 (rod to frame). I need to determine if parts are per side or per vehicle. It's not as simple as it seems.
I have tried to contact Moog - no reply, Rock Auto - didn't know and said contact my mechanic (me), and various auto part web sites to determine how many kits are required per vehicle (ie K8649 X1 or X2? and K8675 X1 or X2)

I'm planning to order thru Rock Auto (best prices + discount) and trying to avoid additional shipping costs to send back or reorder additional parts.

Any help would be appreciated
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Just got done doing this on a 99 Taurus. If the pinch bolt (18mm) breaks off (mine did on one side) you'll have to disassemble everything on that side to repair it. I was careful and it still snapped off. Had to remove the brake drum, disassemble the brakes, remove the brake line (13mm flare nut)and parking brake cable. I also removed the wheel bearing (35mm nut) and the brake backing plate (4 15mm bolts). Then the 2 control arms (18mm) and the link under the knuckle (13/16 nut). Then the 3 nuts inside the car and the whole assy comes out. You
CANNOT accurately drill the broken bolt with the knuckle in the car, you must remove the knuckle too. Put the assy on the bench. I cut the broken bolt at the knuckle split on both sides of the locating tab with a grinder. Then the strut will separate from the knuckle. I drilled the threaded end of the bolt first. Use a center punch and SHARP drill bits (I used cobalts). The end of the bolt isn't flat, it's pointed. You will have to clamp the knuckle in a vise. Use plenty of oil (I used cutting fluid) to keep the bit cool. Take your time and be careful. Once the hole was big enough I used the easy outs and it came right out. Then I had to remove the bolt from the other side. It would not tap out the other side. The stub still had a couple threads on it so I had to cut it again with the grinder. Then the rest of the bolt tapped out. I took 4-5 hours to disassemble everything. Now that I know what to do it will go much faster. I was lucky, the brake drum slid off. This brake has the adjuster in the most difficult place it could be. I have 6 different brake spoons and none of them worked. So beware doing this job friends, There are pitfalls, especially if that pinch bolt snaps off. (And you know if Ford would have just used a nut and bolt instead it would be so easy).
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top