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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I heated, I used atf/acentone, bp blaster, tighten then loosen and tighten then loosen, but still both broke. But, what I learned on the first bolt, I used on the second. You want to drill out the threaded side, before you even think of trying to loosen the bolt. This way once you weaken it, you still have a bolt head to turn. Otherwise, you will be drilling the whole thing out. I killed a drill, a few bit and then went with a carbide burr on an air tool. I have one side done and the other side is 90% drilled out, but I need a new drill. If I still had a bolt head, I would be able to twist it.
The first bolt that broke did turn for a little while. I was very cautious to make sure that it was moving. I tightened and loosened but it still snapped.
So, if you live up north, don't friggin bother. Start drilling it out, weaken it, then use the bolt head to start turning it. If you snap the head of, you've got some frustrated drilling headed your way.

On a positive note, the side that is done, sits much higher. I think my saggy ass will be cured with these quick struts.
 

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So you want to start hollowing out the bolt from the rear end?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Damn straight! Trust me, this is the only way I would do it. You can try to loosen first, if you get no movement, don't bother, just start hollowing it out. I have the other side 90% hollowed out and the friggin thing still won't come out because I have no bolt head to twist it out. If I did not snap the bolt head, I'd be done. Once you get the pinch bolts out, the strut is out minutes later.

QUOTE (thesavo @ May 31 2010, 10:18 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=808224
So you want to start hollowing out the bolt from the rear end?[/b]
 

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I take it an "easy out" is not going to cut it in your case? :(

Addition. I would like to add that I had to replace the struts on a '91 in 2007. That's with 16 years of NYS Salt. I had used Drill bit trick on the drivers side. Since that took so long, that pass side had to wait until next Saturday. Every single day, i sprayed the bolt liberally with PB Blaster . I tell you that bolt was not easy getting out. But it did come out with out being cut. thought I would let you know.
 

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Get the threaded side, and the non threaded side cherry red with either an oxy-acetelyne or an oxy-Mapp torch. Propane or MAPP is a joke, and will just waste time. It's the only way to get those bolts out.

Also, don't plan on reusing the stock bolts. Buy replacements ahead of time. Grade 9.8 or better. And use plenty of anti-seize upon reinstallation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
A torch would be the trick. I had a few easy outs around the house. But, not one that I felt comfortable with. I have actually snapped easy outs before. Snapping those makes for a serious disaster.

QUOTE (Racer X @ May 31 2010, 10:01 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=808238
Get the threaded side, and the non threaded side cherry red with either an oxy-acetelyne or an oxy-Mapp torch. Propane or MAPP is a joke, and will just waste time. It's the only way to get those bolts out.

Also, don't plan on reusing the stock bolts. Buy replacements ahead of time. Grade 9.8 or better. And use plenty of anti-seize upon reinstallation.[/b]
 

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I like your idea of not bothering with the bolt removal. I had the exact same thought after I broke mine. But my procedure will be different from yours:
1. Cut the bolt in half with a cutoff disc. Take 1 minute.
2. Once the bolt is cut and the tension is off, get the bolt head (non-thread part out). This should be easy to do right now because there's no tension and it has not binded yet. Should be able to just pry it out. Should take no more than 10 minutes.
3. Drill and then easy out the threaded part. From what I understand, it is the smooth part of the bolt right under the bolt head that binds. Since that part is removed, getting the threaded part out is easy. Furthermore, since the bolt is cut in half, you can now easy out this thing in the correct direction. If you start drilling from the other side, the bolt tip is pointed so that it is really hard to center. Overall, should take no more than 30 minutes with good drill bits.

The next time I do this (hopefully never), I would use heat and impact wrench. Breaker bar will break the damn thing for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
What kind of cut off disc are you talking about, a dremel? I like your idea.


QUOTE (yiranhu @ May 31 2010, 10:28 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=808256
I like your idea of not bothering with the bolt removal. I had the exact same thought after I broke mine. But my procedure will be different from yours:
1. Cut the bolt in half with a cutoff disc. Take 1 minute.
2. Once the bolt is cut and the tension is off, get the bolt head (non-thread part out). This should be easy to do right now because there's no tension and it has not binded yet. Should be able to just pry it out. Should take no more than 10 minutes.
3. Drill and then easy out the threaded part. From what I understand, it is the smooth part of the bolt right under the bolt head that binds. Since that part is removed, getting the threaded part out is easy. Furthermore, since the bolt is cut in half, you can now easy out this thing in the correct direction. If you start drilling from the other side, the bolt tip is pointed so that it is really hard to center. Overall, should take no more than 30 minutes with good drill bits.

The next time I do this (hopefully never), I would use heat and impact wrench. Breaker bar will break the damn thing for sure.[/b]
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well, I finally got the friggin thing out. I was slightly off center, but I believe it will be fine. There is plenty of metal left. Do not snap the head off. Even the slightest bit of threaded bolt will not give up easily. You need the head to turn it free.
 

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Hey, one of mine came fine with heat and TLC, but the other, well, the drill trick got it moving,,,,but,,,the threads were shot and couldn;t even be CHASED w a tap after! Maine Calcium Chloride east Alloy parts like Taz eats Bugs Bunny . I just used a nut and a bolt. Inspection Mech saw that and just mused "Bad time there , huh ? "
 

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QUOTE (clydesdale @ May 31 2010, 11:47 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=808262
What kind of cut off disc are you talking about, a dremel? I like your idea.[/b]
Angle grinder with a metal cutoff disc. Dremel works too but it's smaller so it will take longer. You can also use a air die grinder with a metal cutoff disc. It actual might be the best choice because it's smaller than angle grinder but larger than dremel. And you can control speed by feathering the throttle.
 
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