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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I found the below while searching for instructions on removing the y-pipe to change the oil pan gasket on a 2001 Vulcan. Does the engine need to be raised per the Alldata instructions?


Vehicle: 2002 Ford Taurus V6-3.0L VIN U

Removing & Reinstalling the Dual converter Y-pipe (Haynes Repair
Manual)

Note: The exhaust headpipe on these cars is a welded assembly of two
catalytic converters and the headpipes for both banks of the engine.
The manufacturer calls it the “dual converter Y-pipe,” or simply the Y-
pipe. The Y-pipe assembly must be removed for other service work, such
as oil pan removal. Refer to Chapter 6 for more information about the
catalytic converters.
1. Raise the vehicle and support it on jack stands.
2. Disconnect the wiring connectors from the four exhaust oxygen (02)
sensors. 02 sensors are installed upstream and downstream from both
catalytic converters.
3. Remove the 02 sensors from the headpipes as follows to get the Y-
pipe assembly out of the car: (a) On a Vulcan V6 engine, remove the
upstream 02 sensors from each headpipe, just below each exhaust
manifold; the downstream sensors can stay in place. (b) On a Duratec
V6 engine, remove all four 02 sensors.
4. Remove the nuts that secure the front and rear headpipes to the
exhaust manifold studs.
5. Remove the nuts and bolts from the catalytic converter brackets at
the transaxle.
6. Remove the nuts and bolts at the flange connection of the Y-pipe
assembly to the exhaust system flex tube.
7. Remove the Y-pipe assembly from the car. You may want an assistant
to help you because the pipe assembly is heavy and awkward.
8. Install new gaskets at all exhaust system joints during
reinstallation. If the nuts and bolts are corroded, it's a good idea
to replace them also.
9. Install the rest of the parts in the reverse order of removal.
Start the engine, and check for exhaust leaks.

Service and Repair: Dual Converter Y-Pipe (Alldata)
Removal
1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
2. Remove the bolts and engine roll restrictor.
3. Remove the bolt, ground strap, and nut.
4. Raise and support the vehicle.
5. Remove the splash shield and the air deflector.
6. Disconnect the Catalyst Monitor Sensor (CMS) electrical
connectors.
7. Remove the nuts securing the heat shield and position it out of the
way.
NOTE: Support the exhaust with mechanic's wire.
8. Remove the nuts and disconnect the three-way catalytic converter
from the dual converter y-pipe.
9. Lower the vehicle.
10. Remove the nuts and the bolt.
11. Using the special tools, raise the front of the engine.
12. Raise the vehicle.
13. Remove the bolt.
CAUTION: The sharp edges on the converter can cut the CV joint boot.
Make sure to protect the halfshaft boot with a suitable covering
before removing the converter assembly. Remove the dual Y-pipe
converter assembly.
14. Remove the gaskets and, if necessary, the Catalyst Monitor Sensors
(CMS); discard the gaskets.
Installation
1. Install the new gaskets and, if removed, install the Catalyst
Monitor Sensors (CMS).
2. Position the dual converter Y-pipe and loosely start the front nuts
and the rear bolt.
3. Tighten the bolt.
4. Lower the vehicle.
5. Tighten the nuts.
6. Lower the engine and remove the special tools.
7. Tighten the bolt.
8. Install the engine roll restrictor and tighten the bolts.
9. Position the heat shield. Install the ground strap and tighten the
bolt and nut.
10. Raise the vehicle.
11. Tighten the nuts.
12. Connect the three-way converter to the dual converter Y-pipe, and
tighten the nuts.
13. Connect the CMS electrical connectors.
14. Install the splash shield and the air deflector, and tighten the
screws.
15. Lower the vehicle.
16. Connect the battery cable.
 

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You may not have to drop the Y-pipe.

This weekend I dropped the oil pan as part of the larger project of replacing the timing cover gasket. Member 00greenlx and I have been trading experiences (actually, he has come up with the majority of good tips) and he mentioned that a subscription service he has had a pointer to removing the oil pan without dropping the Y-pipe.

What you have to do is drain the oil (duh), remove the 02 sensor on the Y-pipe leg closest to the pan.

Then remove all the pan bolts. The pan will drop down but can't be removed because the oil pump pickup is in a baffle inside the oil pan.

However, when you have the pan resting on the Y-pipe as far as it will drop, look inside the driver side end. You will see the oil pump body and one 13mm headed bolt that mounts it to the underside of the block.

Get a 3/8" 13mm socket and a universal joint. Work the socket on to the oil pump and loosen the bolt. You may have to do what I do and use a breaker bar since leverage is limited by the u-joint and the angle you are working at. However, it will break loose and then you can unscrew it for 1/2" or more. At that point, the pan will also drop down to where it can be removed. Or, you can do what I do and unbolt the pump in which case everything will come out.

I will post pictures later this evening to show what you'll see.

My car is a California 2001 SES Vulcan. I'm not sure if the Y-pipe is different than non Californian cars.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
rickpark,
That's very interesting. I did a fair amount of searching earlier and this is the first I've seen that idea. My car is from NY so it's probably that same as yours. I look forward to the pictures, as I plan on attempting this on Wednesday.
 

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Forgot to mention you also have to remove the starter

to have access to some of the oil pan bolts (you would have figured that out). There is also a stamped metal shield that the starter pinion projects through that protects the flywheel, remove this as well (the starter bolts hold it at one end, there is a 13mm bolt that holds it to the transmission at the other end).

This is the O2 sensor that must be removed (you can dry to drop the pan without removing the O2 sensor. A club member reports it was not necessary when he dropped the pan on his 2000 Vulcan. I found it gave me a little more space to work.) :



When you have removed the starter and shield and the O2 sensor, remove all the pan bolts. It will drop until it hits the Y-pipe. You should then be able to move it around until you can see the oil pump body and the single bolt holding it on from the transaxle end of the pan. This next picture shows how I maneuvered a 13mm socket with U-joint (3/8" drive - 1/2" is too big, 1/4" may not give you enough leverage):



Loosen the oil pump bolt until you can free the pan - or just do as I did and remove the bolt completely which allows the pump to drop to the bottom of the pan. It is easily reinstalled when you put the pan back. It also makes it easier to apply the gasket to the block with weatherstrip adhesive and/or silicone. This picture shows how much of the bolt needs to be unscrewed and how the pump will then drop. This was taken after I removed the pan and before reinstalling - I just wanted to make sure there would be no problem putting it back in. This picture was actually taken as I was getting ready to put the pump and pan back on as you can tell by the new gasket.



Here is the underside of the block after the pan removal. As you can see, the Y-pipe is still in place. To the left, you can see where the oil pump mounts and the two guide pins. When reinstalling the pump, you may need to turn the hex-sided shaft and make sure it engages the drive gear when you insert it through the hole that is just above the upper guide pin in this picture. You won't be able to get it to fully engage the guide pins otherwise.



This is the oil pump and the old gasket. The long black thing is the drive shaft which is hex-sided - like an Allen key:



This is how the oil pump is positioned relative to the pan and why you need to loosen it as the circular end of the pick-up tube is constrained by that narrow channel. When you get ready to install the pan (after putting on your new gasket and/or sealant), you will need to put it thusly in the pan, raise the combo to the block and insert the pump drive shaft back from where it was removed. You can then start the bolt and while holding the pump against the block, tighten it. Make sure the guide pins are fully seated as this confirms that the drive shaft is properly in place.



It was really a lot easier than this sounds - rest assured it can be done!
 

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Nice, I didn't think that will be enough space for the socket and U-Joint!
One you have the oil pump down, I would replace the whole assy, or at least the pick-up screen and shaft. That shaft goes in the syncronizer (above).
 

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Yes, I think that would be a good idea if you are

going through the trouble.

Although now, if I have problems with the pump, it won't be an ordeal to drop the pan to replace it - probably an hour's work.

Good point about why you need to replace the camshaft synchro at the first sign of squeaking - lose the synchro and you probably will lose oil pressure.
 

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I don't know whether the 2004 Vulcan engine is different in some way because I managed to get enough space to get the oil pump out but there seems to be a shield of some sort up inside covering the crank that is blocking the pan from fully dropping.

Maybe I am doing something wrong I dunno.

I'll see if I can get a pictures so this may make more sense.

Heres the picture.
http://i54.photobucket.com/albums/g119/Spino183/IMG00029-20110604-1433.jpg
 

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It's like they added the piece just to make you take off the y-pipe.

There's a heat shield covering the rear portion of the pipe that I'm not sure how it was even put in there because I can see no real way to get it in or out. It covers the bolts to the exhaust so it makes is pretty impossible to get to.

It seems like they changed a few things up with this engine generation, and I though 300zx were hard to work on :p
 

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Interesting

Wonder what that new part is that covers the crankshaft area.

Would it have come off by loosening the bolts that hold it to the block?

Glad you were able to complete the job by loosening the Y-pipe.

I will reference this year of Vulcan in the wiki entry to make sure anyone with that year (and probably following years) is aware.
 

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good info to know! gonna have to study up on this thread for when my time comes to install a new y pipe. nothing is wrong with mine, just gonna get a new one since I'm gonna throw some new mufflers on
 

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Hello everyone I am new to this forum....I have a 2001 Ford Taurus I just completed the first phase of removing the pan and cleaning both the block and pan. Tomroow I will be putting everything back in. I have several question:

1. I seen here that the gasket was attached to the block with adhesive or silicone. I purchased the Fel Pro OS 30717R which is the more expensive gasket that has the clips to attach to the pan. anyone use this gasket? Do I run the risk of destroying the gasket if I clip it to the pan and try to insert the assembly back together.. I did not drop the Y just followed the procedure in this thread. This gasket is rigid and preshaped to the pan geometry.

2. I read that there are 2 areas that will require adding RTV silicone on the block.. Anyone knwo where the location would be..

3. the last is the torque sequence. I have read that the sequence is the corners first. then the others bolts from front to back. at the specified torque.

Any input would be greatly appreciated.
 

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From the service DVD:

Tighten the bolts in four stages:

  1. Stage 1: Tighten the four corner bolts to 12 Nm (9 lb-in).
  2. Stage 2: Tighten the remaining bolts to 12 Nm (9 lb-in).
  3. Stage 3: Loosen all the bolts one turn.
  4. Stage 4: Tighten all the bolts to 12 Nm (9 lb-in).
Note that it is lb-inches - not feet! I would tighten every other bolt then go around and tighten the remaining bolts.



Silicone RTV goes where noted on the attached diagram. It covers the seam between the front cover and block, and on the rear of the oil plan mounting surface where the gasket makes a right angle turn from the sides to the rear curved surface.
 

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Thanks for the quick response that clarifies matters. As for this new gasket I purchased, it is not as wide as the original or the one you replaced in the photo. Would it better for be to utilize the clips and place gasket onto the pan or to silicone the gasket to the block. I am not sure with the weight of the gasket with the metal grommets that it would stay put.
Also, I do not want to risk damaging the new gasket in a tight working area with the gasket onto the pan. Any advise would be appreciated.

I will be placing everything back when I get home from work tonight.

Thanks.
 

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I do not recommend using silicone on the gasket except where it is indicated by the service diagram.

You can use gasket or weatherstrip adhesive to keep the gasket in place - it's like contact cement and is applied to both the mating surface and the gasket, then the gasket is pressed on. It will support the weight of the gasket with the metal spacers. I don't know how the clips you mention function but they may serve a similar purpose on the pan itself. You just want to make sure there is no misalignment of the holes or slippage of the gasket inward or outward.

If you use gasket adhesive, you will need to make sure that the surfaces are clean and free of grease or oil.
 

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After many attempts ( alot of cursing) to dry fit the pan with the oil pump to the block I was unable to get the assebly to come together. I played for over an hour. Then relaized that it was not going to happen. I was glad I did not have the gasket on teh pan it would have been destroyed with the dry fit.

I ened dropping the Y pipe which was not that bad..I did round one of the nuts, but a trip to sears solved that issue of removing the nut. Hopefully tomorrow I will put everything back together and maybe they come together smoothly LOL. The I can move onto the tranny oil and pan gasket, and valve cover and intake etc.... the joys of owning a car.

btw - that gasket that fits onto the pan with clips that thing is awesome, you get all the holes lined up and no movement.I just hope it perfroms liek they state.

I wanted to note that your torque specification of 9ib-in that is not correct it is 9 FT lbs.. the specification is 89-123 in-lbs which would average out to be 9 fT LBS
 
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