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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hey all, this is my first post, so i hope i can get a good response.

ive got a 99 taurus with the duratec and i want to install a CAI. so far i only have the filter. the question i have is about the sensor that is attatched right to the air filter housing. is it some sort of temperature probe? if not, any ideas? also, im thinking about leaving everything from the air filter housing to the throttle body because i dont want to re-route those breather lines, pcv line, etc.

any input from people with CAI's on their duratecs would be appreciated, along with any approximate measurements for the bend in the pipe, etc...

thanks alot
 

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Let me be the first to say, as anyone else on here is going to say as well: Your car has a CAI straight from the factory.

Now that that is out of the way... That "thing" right after the air filter housing is the mass air flow sensor. What it measures exactly, I'll let someone else say, but you do need it.
If you are doing your new intake all by yourself check out spectreperformance.com and they have all kinds of stuff for you and they are usually carried by (someone check me on this) O'Reileys autoparts stores... There is TOOONNNSSS of stuff on here about CAIs though. Use the "search forum" on the home page or go to http://www.taurusclub.com/forum/87-engine-drivetrain/84260-cold-air-intake-pictures.html
 

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The sensor bolted onto the air box is the MAF, but IIRC, the IAT (intake air temperature) sensor is located directly in the box. Spectre has a piece for their LEGO kits that lets you attach vac lines and sensors, and that's what I used on my car. The 90 degree elbows for the vac lines fit perfectly, but the IAT is a bit tight, and I needed to lube it with oil and work it in there.
 

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What was said above about the factory intake is true, it is already a cold air intake, with a 2:1 flow margin. That means even when the stock paper filter is 50% plugged it will still meet the engines airflow needs at WOT and redline. If you want to use a cone filter, there are some merits to them, but first lets give a little primer on air filters and there pros and cons when it comes to performance.

The purpose of an air filter is to keep particles that could harm the engine out. Thats it. Different filters can filter out different sized particles. The stock paper filters are designed to keep out sand, microscopic dust, pollen, etc. All of these things can damage the engine, and can also damage the MAF sensor, which provides the computer with information about how much air is flowing through the intake.

Some filters, like K&N and other performance filter use larger pores to allow more flow, and use a sticky oil to trap dirt and dust and keep it out of the engine. There are two major problems with this type of filter. One is that the oil is not 100% effective to begin with. The particles of dirt and dust must actually touch the oil as they pass through the media or they won't stick to it. This means a lot of dust can actually pass right through the filter. Another problem is that as the oil becomes saturated with dirt and dust, it looses its stickyness. This means that as the filter becomes dirtier, it becomes less effective at cleaning the air. Yet another problem is that the oil itself can be caught by the incoming air and it can bring dirt with it. This stuck can stick to the MAF sensor element and it can bring dirt loaded oil into the engine. This means that K&N filters and other filters of their type are failing at the primary purpose of a filter. If they don't keep dirt out, then they aren't doing what a filter is supposed to do.

You can use increased surface area to increase flow. There are pleated paper cone filters that do just this. These filters work pretty well and can go longer between filter changes before they need to be replaced.

There are washable dry filters that don't have the inherent problems with oiled filter elements while maintaining the reusability. I use an AFE drop in filter in my Aerostar, it works great and every time I do an oil change, I remove the filter, rinse it with water, shake the excess water out and let it dry while I finish the oil change. It has saved me money in replacement filters. I wouldn't count on any performance gains because the stock filter was more than adequate.

If you go with a cone filter, you will need to construct some type of shroud that will isolate the filter location from the rest of the engine compartment, otherwise it will draw in the hot air under the hood, and you will no longer have a cold air intake.
 

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I have used K&N and other oil impregnated filters in 8 different cars and over 900,000 miles over 30+ years. I never had problems with oil getting on the hot wire in MAF or premature wear on engines. Oil problems are due to over oiling of the filters. Very little oil is needed and you need to wait for a day for the oil to get wicked by the fibers. The great thing is that everyone can make their own choices. I made mine. I just installed a new intake system with a cone filter in my STS-V. I expect long life and no problems.

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
The sensor bolted onto the air box is the MAF, but IIRC, the IAT (intake air temperature) sensor is located directly in the box. Spectre has a piece for their LEGO kits that lets you attach vac lines and sensors, and that's what I used on my car. The 90 degree elbows for the vac lines fit perfectly, but the IAT is a bit tight, and I needed to lube it with oil and work it in there.
the IAC is what i was referring to. i think thats it.

im aware that the car already has a factory CAI, but this is something id like to do. im going to use 3" stainless pipe and some rubber couplers.

and as far as the filter goes, i have a K&N filter from a Diamond DA-20 Katana aircraft (im an aircraft technician). I know that these filters work well, no issues. and we have the cleaner/oil at my disposal
 

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the IAC is what i was referring to. i think thats it.

im aware that the car already has a factory CAI, but this is something id like to do. im going to use 3" stainless pipe and some rubber couplers.

and as far as the filter goes, i have a K&N filter from a Diamond DA-20 Katana aircraft (im an aircraft technician). I know that these filters work well, no issues. and we have the cleaner/oil at my disposal
No you don't know they work well, and the independent tests show they don't. Unless you want to keep cleaning and replacing the MAF, stay away from them, they are a race filter designed to keep large dirt and debris out of the engine between rebuilds. Why is it that K&N posts no information about how well their filters actually filter? Because they don't want you to know.

This test shows all.
ISO 5011 Duramax Air Filter Test Report
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
No you don't know they work well, and the independent tests show they don't. Unless you want to keep cleaning and replacing the MAF, stay away from them, they are a race filter designed to keep large dirt and debris out of the engine between rebuilds. Why is it that K&N posts no information about how well their filters actually filter? Because they don't want you to know.

This test shows all.
ISO 5011 Duramax Air Filter Test Report
actually, i know that this particular filter does work well. as i stated. it is far more critical to have good filtration into an aircraft engine then a car engine, trust me. and if it filters the air well for the aircraft engine, then its going to do just fine.

what other filters would you recommend out of my own curiosity?
 

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In aircraft, yes it is important to have good filtration, but there is more dirt and dust at or near ground level than their is at altitude. Where is documentation that it filters well for an aircraft?

I use the AFE ProDryS filters. They flow better than stock, have a 99.8% filtering efficiency, they can be washed, they use no oil, and they cost less than comparable K&N filters. They are made from a blend of polymer and fiberglass which does not deteriorate with age. Compare to the cotton used in K&N filters. They filter by having smaller pores, but because the media itself is more carefully designed
 

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I think there's a topic on this on bobtheoilguy.com, look for unbiased testing for filters. I don't care about getting every little hp out of my Vulcan Borus, I just use disposable paper filters, and change them twice a year.
 
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