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Gen 5/6 Forum Moderator
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
A friendly PSA as I didn't see an on-point thread on this recently, and with the cold currently gripping North America, a timely topic.

In Gen 6.5 Taurus vehicles (along with PI variants), the Body Control Module contains parameters that work together with the PCM to optimize system charging and battery lifespan. This system, the Battery Management System, must be reset with the changing of your battery.

Battery Management System reset can be completed in 2 ways:
* Using Ford IDS
* Using FORScan (freeware) with an OBD-II device that can reach HS CAN. Extended license (free) is required to access the Service Procedure tied to the BCM.

Resetting the system will allow the vehicle to re-learn the state of charge/discharge via the Hall effect sensor, and reset an age parameter in the BCM.

If you cannot get the system reset, after replacement, leave the vehicle undisturbed for 8 hours. This includes pressing any remote fobs, opening any doors, etc. The state of charge parameter will recalibrate during this period. Note that the age parameter will NOT be reset with this method, and thus the charging strategy will be inefficient as it will be calibrating charging efforts consistent with an aged battery.

In my experience, even most Ford dealers will neglect to reset the BCM--be sure to ask even if you're having the battery swapped at a Ford-authorized service location, such as Quick Lane or otherwise.

Any questions, please shout out. This notice does NOT apply to 2010-2012 vehicles.
 

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Dumb question. Other than the age parameter, just let the car sit for eight hours? Done that. :)

My battery was replaced by the dealer about 10 months ago. Is it better to have it reset and think the battery is younger than it is or just leave it and have the battery think it is older than it is?
 

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Gen 5/6 Forum Moderator
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Discussion Starter #3
If it were me, I'd reset it since your battery is still fairly young, but I don't have any scientific evidence to back the wisdom of that up.

I'll leave it up to the techs on the forum for a more solid answer.
 

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I've changed the battery out recently, 2 months ago maybe?, and I've never heard of this type of thing. Although, this is the first "modern" car I've owned in....forever.

How is this important to the car? Also, you are in a northern state where snow / freezing temperatures are common this time of year. How about here in SoCal where for us "cold" is anything colder than 50F. This past week, the highs have been in the 70s and lows in mid 50s. That being said, reading your post implies that this is primarily an important thing to do in cars in cold states and I shouldn't have to worry about it here in California. True?
 

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Gen 5/6 Forum Moderator
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Discussion Starter #5
It's more timely due to the battery failure rates in a cold climate, but it should be performed on all vehicles when the battery is swapped.

If you fail to do it, you're risking inefficiency in the charging strategy, but other than that, your car will survive no problem. The important part is the state of charge calibration, but that will recalibrate itself over time (the 8 hours mentioned).

It's something that should be done with all Ford vehicles after 2013 (roughly, don't quote me) or so due to the updates in the BCM/PCM charging strategy. The Explorers have to do it too, along with F150s, etc., of recent vintage.
 

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Can this be done after the fact?


I replaced my battery last winter after a cold AM left it dead, and simply plopped in the new battery and fired up the car and immediately drove it 150 miles. It's seemed fine, but I wonder if I can go into the BCM now and perform the recalibration or if it's too late and just carry on?
 

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It's more timely due to the battery failure rates in a cold climate, but it should be performed on all vehicles when the battery is swapped.

If you fail to do it, you're risking inefficiency in the charging strategy, but other than that, your car will survive no problem. The important part is the state of charge calibration, but that will recalibrate itself over time (the 8 hours mentioned).

It's something that should be done with all Ford vehicles after 2013 (roughly, don't quote me) or so due to the updates in the BCM/PCM charging strategy. The Explorers have to do it too, along with F150s, etc., of recent vintage.
So basically, as long as the car is left alone, it'll recalibrate itself. So like, not doing anything / going anywhere all weekend long will basically take care of itself.
 

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Gen 5/6 Forum Moderator
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Discussion Starter #9
So basically, as long as the car is left alone, it'll recalibrate itself. So like, not doing anything / going anywhere all weekend long will basically take care of itself.
Not the age parameter and you will have the inefficiency as stated earlier.
 

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I still don't get it, apparently.

So the car will work fine and all, but this charging strategy thing won't. What is it? What is it for? What does it do? How does it work? More importantly, what happens if it's not reset?
 

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Gen 5/6 Forum Moderator
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Discussion Starter #11
The vehicle tailors charge to demand and health of the battery. Essentially, it'll be more aggressive on the charge strategy with a newer battery, older ones it'll be less so. Accordingly, you're leaving a little fuel economy on the table if you don't reset. The car won't let itself become discharged, but the fuel economy will be at least a little lower than it has to be as it'll be putting the alternator to work more frequently with an aged battery. With a newer battery, the car will turn off the alternator almost entirely at times to increase fuel economy.

Immediately after the change, the state of charge will be inaccurate as well, which could cause a false positive detection of a discharged battery--that may cause a load shed issue that is otherwise unnecessary (limited performance/features), though this shouldn't be an issue after the 8 hour reset.
 

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My question is, how are there so many people changing out their batteries in the 2013+ models already? I am almost 100% positive the battery in my 2010 is the battery that came with the car from the factory. I bought the car in 2013 and havent bothered with it since. I am replacing it this year hopefully, but more as a precaution so im not left stranded just in case it does die. I dont really think i even need to replace it yet honestly.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
There are a good number of folks who change them out every 3 years like clockwork, often no more than 5. The other part is that battery quality control has been sloppy lately, my OEM battery in the current ride was diagnosed with a bad cell after only 8 months of service.
 

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Don't Be Stupid
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My 2013 came with a 6 month old replacement battery when I bought it 2 years ago. It died 2 months after that. The posts were literally out of the plastic case. The replacement leaked within 4 months.

The replacements were NeverStarts. I would have got a better replacement, but it was zero cost. (Even with the upgrade to group 65)
 

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Our 2013 battery died without warning while we were 100 miles from home. Triple A battery service to the rescue. I asked the tech if he could apply a voltage maintainer while changing the battery so that we wouldn't lose all the in-dash Navigation Favorites, radio pre-sets, etc. He did that and all data was saved. Do I still need to see if this Battery Management System reset needs to be done given that everything had what it thought was battery voltage during the change out? Thanks in advance for any information.
 

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Gen 5/6 Forum Moderator
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Discussion Starter #17
Yes, the BMS still should be reset. It'll reset the battery age parameters to zero for the more effective charging strategy.
 

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I ended up resetting mine when I first read this thread...about a year post battery change.




Anyway, I got 3 years out of my OEM battery. When I replaced it, I went for one with a bit more CCA. I noticed my crank time when cold has been quite excellent.


That is the shortest time period of any battery of any vehicle I've owned. I typically have gotten 6 years. The battery in my Mustang went 10 years before I replaced it...just because.


There really are only three main battery manufacturers, so they are pretty much all the same. Johnson Controls makes the motorcraft battery and also makes they for brands such as Duralast, Die Hard, etc. They just slap different labels on them so get whatever is the best deal to you.
 
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