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Discussion Starter #1
I drive a 2001 bull with 66K, it drives good, and has no problems.

When I drive my friends cars Mazda / Honda / Totota, I feel that the Power steering and Gas pedal in those cars is very responsive, just Feather light. Also the brake pedal is much more responsive.

Whereas in my Bull it takes some effort to move the steering wheel, and also the gas pedal takes a harder push to move from stop.

I cant move the wheel from end-to-end, with my left hand, with the car not moving. The PS is recently flushed.

Is this the way Bull is designed ?

I heard that the PS in Tauri is Hydraulic, wheres in Imports its Electric, is it true ?
 

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Ahh the classic symptoms of an American Car. Just wait till your power steering wails like a flogged dolphin
 

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It all depnds on the car, some are just easier to move then others. If the gas pedal is giving you a work out and you think you may brake soemhting then maybe the cable needs to be lubed.

The Taurus is hyrdaulic. As far as imports I bleive most are hydraulic but some can be electric.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Gas Pedal is not sticking, and is not gonna break. Also the Steering has always been like that.

I was just comparing, that the overall feel of Bull is heavy - be it Steering, Gas or Break pedal.

Yesterday, I was driving friend's 2002 Protege, with 90K, and I was literally able to turn the wheel with 2 fingers.
 

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Comparing the Protege to the Taurus - the Taurus feel a lot heavier because it is.

I hate that overboosted power steering feel...for me, it's a personal preference thing. Our Camry is like that and has basically zero steering feel. I'd prefer the ZX2s to be heavier too, but it isn't as overboosted as the Camry. I have an underdrive pulley so mine is heavier than stock as well, which I really like - if that was all the underdrive pulley did, I'd do it for that. It isn't hard to turn, it just has some weight behind it.

FWIW, almost everything on the road had engine-driven hydraulic power steering until recently. There are also electric hydraulic power steering systems, like the Toyota MR2 and MR2 Spyder had. Some like the newer Honda Civics have direct drive electric power steering where there is basically an electric motor bolted to the rack and there isn't hydraulic fluid involved.

The new Fusion, except for the Sport, has electric power steering. The Fusion Sport has conventional hydraulic power steering, of which I prefer the feel.

As far as the gas pedal - it should feel like there's something attached to it, but it shouldn't be difficult to move. Some cheaper imports with drive-by-wire throttle feel like the gas pedal just kind of flops around, which I find just as annoying as overboosted steering...but again, I personally prefer the car's controls to have some weight behind them. Not to the point of being difficult or annoying, but I think it feels better that way. Some people like them extremely light, but that's why there's more than one kind of car :)
 

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I find the Taurus gas pedal to be a bit on the touchy side. Both my G2 Sable and G4 Taurus have sensitive gas pedals (even compared to other Fords). As for the steering, I'd prefer to have it a little on the heavy side. I find Hondas are way too touchy in the steering department. GMs (particularly Buicks and Oldsmobiles) have very light steering which feels detached from the road, but you could turn it with two fingers.

Braking is a mixed bag. I don't like the brakes on the Taurus or Windstar. It's a little on the squishy side until you get to the end of travel. The European Fords (Contour and Focus) have the best braking feeling with it not being too soft or too hard. I've driven a few Hondas and the newest ones have overly sensitive brakes such that if it did not have ABS I would have locked up the wheels on the slightest touch. Newer GMs are adapting Honda's brake feel and Chryslers are adopting the Euro Fords brake feel. Older Hondas, however, have dangerously squishy brakes which kind of scare me.
 

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My mom's mazda tribute has stiff power steering and the gas pedal is like stepping on a brick for the first 1/4-1/2 of travel and then super soft for the rest. Makes it interesting if you haven't driven it in awhile.
 

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After owning a Buick Park Ave for a while, and then going into this Taurus, it took me some getting used to. Yes, the gas pedal is touchy, hair trigger like at first, and the steering is much firmer than the Buick's. It just depends on the car. The steering effort in the Mazda 3 I think is close to what the Taurus is. Maybe you have some air trapped in your power steering? Maybe it's time to lube up the throttle cable in you Taurus?
 

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About the Taurus brake pedal feel...assuming good, relatively new fluid in both, adjustable pedal cars are a LOT mushier than non-adjustable pedal cars.

I don't find the gas pedal in the Taurus overly sensitive at all...the ZX2 is much more abrupt, kind of like the last-gen Fusion/Milan/MKZ, only more so.
 

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I know this is a old thread but just had this happen to my sable and I think I know what causes it.

I was suspecting my car was idling high so I adjusted the idle screw under the throttle line and loosened it a bit to lower the idle.

Then after that I noticed while driving the gas pedal was harder to press at take off and after stops.

At take off after pressing the gas pedal harder it would take off abruptly.

So I tightened the idle screw back and checked it and seems its all good.

Might have to adjust to idle right but the hardness in the gas pedal is gone.

I can take a picture of the location of the screw if anyone needs it.
 

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I know this is a old thread but just had this happen to my sable and I think I know what causes it.

I was suspecting my car was idling high so I adjusted the idle screw under the throttle line and loosened it a bit to lower the idle.

Then after that I noticed while driving the gas pedal was harder to press at take off and after stops.

At take off after pressing the gas pedal harder it would take off abruptly.

So I tightened the idle screw back and checked it and seems its all good.

Might have to adjust to idle right but the hardness in the gas pedal is gone.

I can take a picture of the location of the screw if anyone needs it.
The throttle plate is supposed to be as closed to tight without sticking. No adjustment other, does not fix idle speed. That is managed by the IAC and PCM. However, significant air leaks can upset it so it cannot hold. PCV valve can do that.

As to PS feel: I have '01 Sable, and 2 '03 Sables. The '01 feels much heavier, always been that way. 11 years and no change. I realize kind of tire and pressure can be somewhat involved, but that is for sure not it.

I realize this is old post.
But then I am OLD!
-chart
 

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As Chart said, NEVER EVER mess with the throttle stop screw! If you do close the throttle plate with the the screw, the IAC will just open farther to get the idle to the idle RPM target programmed into the PCM. Also, since the throttle plate is set from the factory to be virtually closed, closing it further can cause it to stick shut, as the brass throttle plate and aluminum TB have significantly different thermal expansion coefficients.

Many cable operated TB's these days don't even have an adjustment screw in the first place.
 

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The throttle plate is supposed to be as closed to tight without sticking. No adjustment other, does not fix idle speed. That is managed by the IAC and PCM. However, significant air leaks can upset it so it cannot hold. PCV valve can do that.

As to PS feel: I have '01 Sable, and 2 '03 Sables. The '01 feels much heavier, always been that way. 11 years and no change. I realize kind of tire and pressure can be somewhat involved, but that is for sure not it.

I realize this is old post.
But then I am OLD!
-chart
Maybe I didn't word it right but I am not messing with the throttle plate.
It's a screw where the throttle line gives the car gas.
If it is unscrewed too much it will cause the gas pedal to feel hard to press.
Screwing it in too much will cause the car to idle high and take off in drive while not pressing the gas pedal.

I will see if I can take a picture of it later.
 

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As Chart said, NEVER EVER mess with the throttle stop screw! If you do close the throttle plate with the the screw, the IAC will just open farther to get the idle to the idle RPM target programmed into the PCM. Also, since the throttle plate is set from the factory to be virtually closed, closing it further can cause it to stick shut, as the brass throttle plate and aluminum TB have significantly different thermal expansion coefficients.

Many cable operated TB's these days don't even have an adjustment screw in the first place.
Don't want to retype everything so read my reply to Chart.
 

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Maybe I didn't word it right but I am not messing with the throttle plate.
It's a screw where the throttle line gives the car gas.
If it is unscrewed too much it will cause the gas pedal to feel hard to press.
Screwing it in too much will cause the car to idle high and take off in drive while not pressing the gas pedal.

I will see if I can take a picture of it later.
The throttle plate is connected to the arm that the cable is connected to, in which the screw moves. SO..... if you move that screw, you are moving the throttle plate in the TB and Jeff/Chart's statements hold 100% truth.
 

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The throttle plate is connected to the arm that the cable is connected to, in which the screw moves. SO..... if you move that screw, you are moving the throttle plate in the TB and Jeff/Chart's statements hold 100% truth.
Yes thank you for clearing that up but they thought I was messing with the inside throttle plate when I wasn't.

My comment was more to fix the issue of when the gas pedal feels hard to press, the reason is this screw being unscrewed too much.
 

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I am quite sure Chart & Jeff were referring to the throttle plate adjustment screw whose sole purpose is keeping the plate from closing to the point of binding and is not an adjusting screw. All three of them are correct, it should in no case be 'adjusted'.
 

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I am quite sure Chart & Jeff were referring to the throttle plate adjustment screw whose sole purpose is keeping the plate from closing to the point of binding and is not an adjusting screw. All three of them are correct, it should in no case be 'adjusted'.
This screw can be adjusted and a lot of people do it to cars when trying to sell them, so that they can at least idle instead of dying.


My post was just to point that out so that people can check it incase their gas pedal was hard to press.
 

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On OBDI 5.0's it was common to adjust the throttle stop screw. Run it in a few turns, disconnect the IAC and start it up. Adjust the screw to desired idle speed and shut off. At this point, disconnect battery for a computer reset and plug the IAC back in.

In those EEC systems the IAC's only function was to adjust idle air depending on loads from the alternator, compressor or putting into drive to keep a constant RPM (along with coasting functions). OBDII strategies may be entirely different.

On a Tec I wouldn't mess with it. Sounds like the wrong solution to the problem.
 
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