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Discussion Starter #1
The car is a 2001 Taurus SEL with 120000 miles on it.

I got these two codes P0171 and P0174 (system too lean on Bank1 and Bank2) about a month ago. It ran realatively OK, but the car had some trembling and shaking from time to time when idling. The idle speed started to fluctuate sometimes it dropped below 500rpm and the car would shake a bit.

So I sent it to a "trustworthy" shop when the annual inspection was due. My mechanic found out that there was some vacuum leak and also saw smoke coming out from EGR valve when doing a smoke test. He replaced a cracked intake tubing along with the EGR valve and I asked him to change my spark plugs when he took the intake mainfold out to find the vacuum leak. Got charged for 600ish dollars, showing on the receipt that he replaced several gaskets, the EGR valve, that tubing etc.

Today when I picked up my car, he told me that he ran it yesterday and was fine and asked me to test drive it. Within 2 miles, the light came on again, and I could still feel the trembling and shaking, it's just not as frequently as before, also I did see the idle speed still fluctuate from 500rpm to my normal idle of 650 or so. I drove it back and it turned out to be the exact same two error codes. Now he told me that it could be the oxygen sensors and they need to be replaced othervise the catalyst sensor(? or sth related to catalyst) would be damaged which cost a lot more.

I was totally pissed but needed the car over the weekend so I took off with some deposit and would be back on Monday for the unfinished business. It's like he wanted 600 bucks and just for replacing parts here and there while the problems remained unsolved after 1.5 weeks.

Two questions:
1. Did I get ripped off or that's about the right price tag for identifying the vacuum leak and replacing the parts? At first he told me it was just a below 300 bux job, need to replace EGR valve and the cracked tubing. But without informing me, he changed some additional stuff such as an elbow, some gaskets and stuff, increasing the labor fee a lot.

2. Now the codes are still there but the vacuum leak is supposed to be fixed. What else might go wrong? And do I need to replace the O2 sensors and is it as severe as he said (would cost me more damage)

3. He promised to replace them labor free, only need the parts. But he seemed to prefer "genuine ford part" from dealer which alwasy looks more expensive than RockAuto. Are there any good recommendation of aftermarket o2 sensors? I checked online, rockauto and partsamerica, the range is from 40ish to 170ish. I remember my mechanic told me it would be 100ish each.

Thanks in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Check out this thread: http://www.taurusclub.com/wiki/index.php/G..._P0174_Solution

Aftermarket PCVs do not seem to fit/work properly. Use those two Ford parts and you'll be set :)

This thread has a good trick on removing the old PCV too: http://www.taurusclub.com/forum/index.php?...1512&hl=pcv
[/b]
Do you think that's the reason for every situation when two P0171 and P0174 showed up at the same time? What if my PCV does not leak? The mechanic spent quite some time to find the leak and get the right part, and it should not be any vacuum leak. Other than real air leak, do you think it might be other problems as well?

But anyway, he did not replace the part in that picture. The tubing he replaced is F5DE-6758-GB with a heck lot of cracks and another valve with part number: YF1E-9D475-B2B
 

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With 2000-3 Duratecs, that code combination more often than not indicates that the tube, pictured in the link I posted above, has fractured. Even the symptoms you mention such as the rough idle...they indicate that, and my car exhibits the same thing right now (waiting for replacements from fastpartsnetwork right now). And considering the age of of your car and mileage...you are due for a PCV replacement anyways (100K replacement). It'll help the idle and your MPG out B)
 

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It is unlikely that both O2 sensors went bad at the same time, however, with your mileage, they are due for replacement. I do not think this is the source of your current problem, but once the main problem is corrected, new O2 sensors will help to maintain proper gas mileage.

The mechanic may have created a new problem mimicking the old one. If the mechanic removed the upper intake manifold to service the PCV tubing, he may have unknowingly caused a new vacuum leak. The vacuum lines and manifold gaskets are delicate, especially when they are older.

P0171 and P0174 simultaneously suggests a significant vacuum leak at or before the upper intake manifold. inspect all vac lines and connections. Check the UIM gasekts for leaks or tears.

Kinda seems like he replaced stuff that wasn't necessary... the EGR valve for instance. These rarely fail. If there were no other codes to suggest a problem with the EGR, it was unlikely to be part of the problem.

As far as brand of O2 sensor... NTK is the OEM brand. NTK is produced by NGK. Motorcraft O2 sensors are from NTK. Denso's product looks almost identical. Others have used Bosch O2 sensors without problems, but do not use Bosch spark plugs in modern Fords. I tend to stay away from Bosch O2 sensors but only because I think the sensor itself is ugly... big and bulky versus NTK and Denso's lean and thin.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It is unlikely that both O2 sensors went bad at the same time, however, with your mileage, they are due for replacement. I do not think this is the source of your current problem, but once the main problem is corrected, new O2 sensors will help to maintain proper gas mileage.

The mechanic may have created a new problem mimicking the old one. If the mechanic removed the upper intake manifold to service the PCV tubing, he may have unknowingly caused a new vacuum leak. The vacuum lines and manifold gaskets are delicate, especially when they are older.

P0171 and P0174 simultaneously suggests a significant vacuum leak at or before the upper intake manifold. inspect all vac lines and connections. Check the UIM gasekts for leaks or tears.

Kinda seems like he replaced stuff that wasn't necessary... the EGR valve for instance. These rarely fail. If there were no other codes to suggest a problem with the EGR, it was unlikely to be part of the problem.

As far as brand of O2 sensor... NTK is the OEM brand. NTK is produced by NGK. Motorcraft O2 sensors are from NTK. Denso's product looks almost identical. Others have used Bosch O2 sensors without problems, but do not use Bosch spark plugs in modern Fords. I tend to stay away from Bosch O2 sensors but only because I think the sensor itself is ugly... big and bulky versus NTK and Denso's lean and thin.
[/b]
Thanks for the suggestion. I'll have to ask him re-check the vacuum lines. He was in the biz for maybe 40 yrs, an old but experienced guy in the neighborbood. Sometimes, I may trust him too much. sigh :dunno:

Anyway, from the replaced parts he left me, I did see the UIM gaskets. He replaced them already。 And for the PCV valve and stuff I beleive it was replaced 2 yrs ago when I got engine stall from time to time and turned out to be some leak. However, back then no code was found and I'm not sure if it's the exact part listed here.

It's just unbelievable that he spent so much time and labor with his experience but fail to nail the spot. I don't know how they worked this out, but I think when you try your a$$ off to find out some vacuum leak and replaced cracked parts and seal them properly, you gotta check the lines again to make sure that actually fix the leak. As you said, if he created new leaks while fixing the old ones and then did not check that out, that's really shocking.

So from you guys' opinion, with these two codes, it just indicates vacuum leak? Would it be some inacurrate reading from sensors such as MAF or O2 sensors?


As far as brand of O2 sensor... NTK is the OEM brand. NTK is produced by NGK. Motorcraft O2 sensors are from NTK. Denso's product looks almost identical. Others have used Bosch O2 sensors without problems, but do not use Bosch spark plugs in modern Fords. I tend to stay away from Bosch O2 sensors but only because I think the sensor itself is ugly... big and bulky versus NTK and Denso's lean and thin.
[/b]
And for the o2 sensors, I always see Pepboys have this promotion for Bosch at 19.99 while other places like Advance or Autozone, the cheapest one would still be 30-40ish. Any experience with the cheap ones?
 

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Cheap O2 sensors tend to be universal, meaning they do not come with the correct pigtail. Instead they come with 4 splice connectors, you cut the pigtail off your old sensor, match the wires, and splice in the new sensor. More expensive sensors will always include the correct pigtail and wire length. I have no experience with them as I choose to spend the extra money and get a part that works right out of the box.
 

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Here is my story, hope it will help someone. Started getting lean codes in November of last year. When it became consistant and started effecting idling (made it very rough), I went in and after searching for a while replaced the tube that goes to PCV valve (the 90 degree bend had a hole in it, like many here described). That solved the problem for a few weeks. Than the problem came back. Went further and replaced the piece that goes on PCV valve itself (it was cracked also). That helped for a while, than back to the codes and rough idling. After some pain replaced PCV valve itself (in 24 valve version it is hidden in the guts of the engine) - no change. More searching, decided to replace Upper Manifold Gaskets. That fixed the problem for the entire week - than it became worse than before, the car actually died a few times when cold and sometimes was dropping RPMs even hot, which did not happen before. I have had it and took it to the shop. They replaced lower gaskets and boom - the car runs like new! I was so close... In a hindsight it actually makes sense - the car has 183K miles on it, and as I was plugging the vacuum leeks, the knew ones were developing, sometimes worse than the previous ones. The moral of the story for me is to always replace both sets of gaskets at the same time, while you are there - my mistake cost me $240 and a LOT of frustration. Actually, for those of you who have replaced the lower set of gaskets, what exactly do you need to do after you got to the upper ones? Is it just unscrewing 8 bolts that hold the piece between the upper and lower gaskets and lifting it together with fuel lines still attached or there is more to it? This was on my 2001 Sable and my wife is driving 1999 Sable with over 100K miles which I suspect will need the same procedure done and this time around I intend to do both sets myself at the same time...
 

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QUOTE (chainik @ Oct 5 2009, 01:00 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=757867
Here is my story, hope it will help someone. Started getting lean codes in November of last year. When it became consistant and started effecting idling (made it very rough), I went in and after searching for a while replaced the tube that goes to PCV valve (the 90 degree bend had a hole in it, like many here described). That solved the problem for a few weeks. Than the problem came back. Went further and replaced the piece that goes on PCV valve itself (it was cracked also). That helped for a while, than back to the codes and rough idling. After some pain replaced PCV valve itself (in 24 valve version it is hidden in the guts of the engine) - no change. More searching, decided to replace Upper Manifold Gaskets. That fixed the problem for the entire week - than it became worse than before, the car actually died a few times when cold and sometimes was dropping RPMs even hot, which did not happen before. I have had it and took it to the shop. They replaced lower gaskets and boom - the car runs like new! I was so close... In a hindsight it actually makes sense - the car has 183K miles on it, and as I was plugging the vacuum leeks, the knew ones were developing, sometimes worse than the previous ones. The moral of the story for me is to always replace both sets of gaskets at the same time, while you are there - my mistake cost me $240 and a LOT of frustration. Actually, for those of you who have replaced the lower set of gaskets, what exactly do you need to do after you got to the upper ones? Is it just unscrewing 8 bolts that hold the piece between the upper and lower gaskets and lifting it together with fuel lines still attached or there is more to it? This was on my 2001 Sable and my wife is driving 1999 Sable with over 100K miles which I suspect will need the same procedure done and this time around I intend to do both sets myself at the same time...[/b]
I thought I read in the service manual that the fuel line needs to be disconnected... If it does not need to be disconnected, then it is not a bad job.
 

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QUOTE (yiranhu @ Oct 5 2009, 04:23 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=757905
QUOTE (chainik @ Oct 5 2009, 01:00 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=757867
Here is my story, hope it will help someone. Started getting lean codes in November of last year. When it became consistant and started effecting idling (made it very rough), I went in and after searching for a while replaced the tube that goes to PCV valve (the 90 degree bend had a hole in it, like many here described). That solved the problem for a few weeks. Than the problem came back. Went further and replaced the piece that goes on PCV valve itself (it was cracked also). That helped for a while, than back to the codes and rough idling. After some pain replaced PCV valve itself (in 24 valve version it is hidden in the guts of the engine) - no change. More searching, decided to replace Upper Manifold Gaskets. That fixed the problem for the entire week - than it became worse than before, the car actually died a few times when cold and sometimes was dropping RPMs even hot, which did not happen before. I have had it and took it to the shop. They replaced lower gaskets and boom - the car runs like new! I was so close... In a hindsight it actually makes sense - the car has 183K miles on it, and as I was plugging the vacuum leeks, the knew ones were developing, sometimes worse than the previous ones. The moral of the story for me is to always replace both sets of gaskets at the same time, while you are there - my mistake cost me $240 and a LOT of frustration. Actually, for those of you who have replaced the lower set of gaskets, what exactly do you need to do after you got to the upper ones? Is it just unscrewing 8 bolts that hold the piece between the upper and lower gaskets and lifting it together with fuel lines still attached or there is more to it? This was on my 2001 Sable and my wife is driving 1999 Sable with over 100K miles which I suspect will need the same procedure done and this time around I intend to do both sets myself at the same time...[/b]
I thought I read in the service manual that the fuel line needs to be disconnected... If it does not need to be disconnected, then it is not a bad job.
[/b][/quote]

Yes, I know, but service manual almost always gives more steps, than are really necessary... I was hoping a few folks who have done it will pitch in...
 

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QUOTE (chainik @ Oct 5 2009, 06:03 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=757947
QUOTE (yiranhu @ Oct 5 2009, 04:23 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=757905
QUOTE (chainik @ Oct 5 2009, 01:00 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=757867
Here is my story, hope it will help someone. Started getting lean codes in November of last year. When it became consistant and started effecting idling (made it very rough), I went in and after searching for a while replaced the tube that goes to PCV valve (the 90 degree bend had a hole in it, like many here described). That solved the problem for a few weeks. Than the problem came back. Went further and replaced the piece that goes on PCV valve itself (it was cracked also). That helped for a while, than back to the codes and rough idling. After some pain replaced PCV valve itself (in 24 valve version it is hidden in the guts of the engine) - no change. More searching, decided to replace Upper Manifold Gaskets. That fixed the problem for the entire week - than it became worse than before, the car actually died a few times when cold and sometimes was dropping RPMs even hot, which did not happen before. I have had it and took it to the shop. They replaced lower gaskets and boom - the car runs like new! I was so close... In a hindsight it actually makes sense - the car has 183K miles on it, and as I was plugging the vacuum leeks, the knew ones were developing, sometimes worse than the previous ones. The moral of the story for me is to always replace both sets of gaskets at the same time, while you are there - my mistake cost me $240 and a LOT of frustration. Actually, for those of you who have replaced the lower set of gaskets, what exactly do you need to do after you got to the upper ones? Is it just unscrewing 8 bolts that hold the piece between the upper and lower gaskets and lifting it together with fuel lines still attached or there is more to it? This was on my 2001 Sable and my wife is driving 1999 Sable with over 100K miles which I suspect will need the same procedure done and this time around I intend to do both sets myself at the same time...[/b]
I thought I read in the service manual that the fuel line needs to be disconnected... If it does not need to be disconnected, then it is not a bad job.
[/b][/quote]

Yes, I know, but service manual almost always gives more steps, than are really necessary... I was hoping a few folks who have done it will pitch in...
[/b][/quote]
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I sent the procedures to TCCA a few months back. Here it is again...

CODES: P0302,0171,0174,P0131,P0136, P0151, etc
Originally, the car had a slight miss at idle and ran fine when you picked up speed. With the DTC code saying that # 2 spark plug as Kaput (That is technical jargon, and I will not try to educate you here), and another code saying that it was not running right under 1000 RPM. Jeannette knew that one before we even put the OMB ll on the car. I get new plugs and put them in. Not an easy task considering you have to disconnect six sensors and remove the air plenum, throttle, and air filter housing. After the work was done, it ran worserer than it did before (another bit of technical jargon).
New codes and all the ensuing ones for the next three days said that I had Lean fuel to both banks of cylinders, all but one (there are four O2 sensors) were bad, and a lack of signals to certain items in the engine compartment.
OK, why would all of a sudden, I start getting all these codes? It ran fine, but a slight roughness to the engine in idle, and replacing the spark plugs should have taken care of that. I must have screwed up somewhere and maybe did not get the spark plugs put back in straight or something. So I remove everything I did originally, and guess what? Everything was fine. OK, put it all back together again.
I commence a two day tracing of wires, diagrams, "CHARGE" sheet (Things to do and check) to eliminate everything that the codes and books (Have I ever told you what I think of Haynes and Chilton books since the 70's ?) say the problem most likely is. I buy a new MAF (The old one was good, but hey, now I got a one year warranty...better look to see if it mentions ficus trees), I buy a new IAT valve. The old one was good so I cleaned it up and put it in the box and put it on the shelf. The new one went on the car. I refused to believe that all the O2 sensors went Kaput at one instantaneous point in time.
I have now reverted back to Neanderthal mind set and am making a mental note of where I put the ax.
Fug the book. Think! Think like an old mechanic..... Not so good. If all the plugs are in and getting electricity, and the gas is good, and it runs when you get it moving and hopefully do not come up on a stop sign, what the hey would make it do that? Vacuum?!? I take my stethoscope and add another short piece of tube and tape them together. Put it in my ears, start the car and go all around the air plenum, throttle, etc. trying to locate a vacuum leak.
Now I am back at the kitchen table buried in drawings, books, etc and about to go stir craz- IER...
OK, Jeannette of all people decides to input the codes wording into the computer via the Big "I" (that is, again, technical jargon for Internet) and up pops a page by the Taurus Club of America. Can you believe there are people that would start a club telling the world that they own a FORD? Good Lord. Think that is funny? Read on!
In this particular page, the list the two codes, 0171 and 0174 (same report but for the two cylinder banks). Then is listed the 20 or so things that this fancy OMB shrinks into two codes 4 numbers long. Most of them I have now eliminated.
Farther down they start talking about something that has not been put on the official list. A short hose with a 90 degree hose that has a split in it. They give the location as under the throttle and tell about it going down and to parts unknown. It is by the power steering and the power brake booster. I look and can find nothing, so I decide I need to get under
the car to look up and see if I can find it. I move the truck and have Jeannette drive the car up to the front of the garage. I place two rams in front of the wheels and she tries to get up them. Now, I have to admit that with the car stuttering and the ramps (metal) slippery,she is not gonna have a good time. Several times she almost makes it, but then the car slides back. Finally she hits it. Good. Now the driver's side ramp is collapsed under the car and the right front of the fender has impaled the corner of the brick wall of the garage door.
BIG NOTE HERE: I know it wasn't your fault Hon.
I jack the car up and remove the ramp....Yeah, I know, should have used the jack in the first place.
Jack the other side up because she went right over the end of the ramp placing it undamaged and squarely behind the passenger front tire. Jacked up, I remove that ramp. Back the car up.
GET THE JACKS...... And start jacking the front as Jeannette gets the big wooden block for the back times.
After I am all set, I climb under the car and can't find NO FRICKEN HOSE down there. Arghhhhh!
Get out and start to look again from the top. Can not find nothing. Of course, this being winter and all, no, no snow, sunshine. Bright assed sunshine. Not very conductive to looking down amongst black hoses, and engine parts with God holding a super beam in your eyes. Eventually, I did take this big ol' honker moving pad for a double wide refrigerator that I bought at Harbor Freight and threw that across the hood and passenger side making a dandy little tent.
Back to the vacuum leak. It is possessing me now. Again, I go get the stethoscope and again I start to listen. Nothing! Then (maybe the synapses start to work) I think, go down under the area. Not from under the car, just move the hose around all the areas I can and listen for something to zero in on. Not needed. No siree. I slide it in at one spot and it was like a jet went screaming past my ears. I jumped back and said, "Wow!" or something like that. I spend the next 10 minutes trying to relocate the spot. I had to move real slow like. Ahh, let me give you this analogy...You are looking for a snake in the garage. You find it when you least expect it and drop it. You need to go back in after it...and you do, but a whole lot slower.
Slowly, I move the hose around, and VOILA! I find it. I move the hose all around and zero in on the loudest sound, then brace my hand against the throttle shield. From there I look from the front and can see the hose quite clearly. What did I find? A fricken 90 degree elbow with a clamp that would choke a horse...and yet the end goes into a small metal tube....no clamp????? Amazing.

Picture here, but TCCA won't let me install I guess.

OK, I got this sucker pinned now, I am going in for the kill.
Remove the air plenum, remove the throttle assy, remove the air filter and tube...and of course remove the 5 sensor connectors and four vacuum hoses and there it is. Right under the air plenum, a soft rubber hose elbow just like the PVC ones on the front and back valve covers. All rotted and worthless as nipples on a boar hog.
A quick trip to the Ford Dealer and another $30.00 plus a stop at Advance auto parts for three pieces of rubber hose.. Oh Lord, here we go again. Ford uses a 15/32" hose...not 1/2, and not 7/16. Guess what? The car parts stores do not carry 15/32" hose.
Two other hoses under there were 1. Hose that goes to the Brake booster and 2. Hose about 4 inches long that goes from the end of the one I am replacing to some sort of little plenum (my guess and choice of words) that is a little rectangular thing that sits at the bottom of the v in the engine. I do not know what it is, and it is hidden by a wire way that has absolutely no give to enable you to look and see.
Everything put together and I start the car. Smooth as a purring kitty. I went in and told Jeannette to take it for a ride. She leaves, and I pick up the tools and put them in the garage. She pulls back in to the driveway after a bit and says, "It runs a lot better, BUT !" I never heard a thing she said. After a second (and no I wasn't swearing or anything) I asked her what and she said it seems to lack power and when it shifts it almost slams into gear. I look at the gage and bigger n' poo-poo there is the Check engine light again. This time, I am ahead of the game. I told her to pop the hood and I walked around to the front. As soon as she said it didn't seem to have power and shifted questionably, I had a snap shot of a picture pop into my head. I lifted the hood and reached down and plugged in the MAF connector. She retested and after 4 hours of driving this afternoon, it is
smooth as silk and no codes.

If you want the procedure to reach the bottom intake manifold gaskets, e-mail me at [email protected]. No charge, just ask or ask TCCA as I sent it to them also. Ken
 

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hello? i know its a OLD thread but could i get that info on getting to the LIM gaskets? i plan to change mines and that fricking PVC hose is the culprit to my Lean codes,i have been driving lean for a while and i guess i hit a pothole and the hose came off the PVC, i can spot it removing the throttle assembly and air tubes but i can barley reach it.. if the info is still available could i please have it? and thanks again to TCCA for all the great DIY in provided by newbies and veterans alike.. i would like to give back by putting pics n step by step. thank you
 

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It's straightforward, you just need an assortment of small metric sockets and extensions, and the fuel line disconnect tool, which you can get generic pretty cheap now. Remove the throttle body, fuel lines, IMRC cable, a few wires, take your time. Clean the mating surfaces carefully. The Permatex gasket remover stuff works nicely. Get Fel Pro gaskets upper and lower, consider doing plugs and wires if you haven't recently. Clean IMRC butterflies and operate by hand, clean throttle body with TB/MAF cleaner (not carb cleaner).

The PCV hose may be a pain to track down, call around, you may end up going to a Ford dealer. Ford changed the design a bunch of times and on my 97 I used their most recent number but had to cut the length down. Carry the old one with you to be sure. Nothing is an exact fit in EmmissionLand. :(
 

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Hmm, I'm kinda having a similar issue. Gas mileage isn't where it should be idle, is sometimes rough, and other times fine. Once it a while it stumbles at an idle, and sometimes when it stumbles it stalls. It has been hooked up the the smoke machine and they found the PCV elbow was leaking, which they promptly fixed, then hooked it back up the the machine and found 2 more leaks, one at the EGR valve, which they seemed to think was normal, and one at the vacuum distribution tree, the black plastic box on the firewall. I'm not sure what to think about either, the black plastic box I replaced back in May because the original one had cracked. So it is new. Perhaps it is only sealed against vacuum. I'm just not sure whether it leaking could be considered normal or not.

My car does not have any codes at all, but the LTFT trims do indicate that a vacuum leak is possible.
 

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thanks alot for the tips,WJC removing the air tube assembly i can get to the hose that i need.. yes i think i will have to go to the ford dealership,need a vacuum line but i ordered the elbow from Rockauto, good stuff like 8$ hope it arrives soon.. im good as long as they stil have it.. went to a U Pull It junkyard picked up alot of nice things mirror,bumper..hoses were no good tho :( agian thank you to all on this forum and i will b buying a torque wrench and the gasket removal stuff.. i will b posting alot of pics and if needed people can email me for them.. im a newb but i think this site is great, do my part to help the next.. KhanTyranitar -- IMO no leak is "normal " try new ERG gaskets? maby at the junkyard pull all the vaccum lines u see, replace all gaskets if not replaced? no codes is great but performance is still affected,just a thought good luck
 

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Well, its leaking from the diaphragm of the EGR, but from what the technician told be, he said the diaphragm only seals vacuum, and that if you run pressurized smoke, that even new ones leak because they are designed to vent, much like the IAC does. I was running that past you guys to see if that was consistent. He seemed concerned about the vacuum distribution box however.
 

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This is the exact problems I've been having. I guess its just time to pop the hood and track down anything that could possibly go wrong.

At least I can hear a hissing sound so it shouldn't be a long shot to find it.
 

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big thank you to dandur805, and everyone else.. i fixed my CEL light nasty vaccum leak, i purchased the pcv tubing from rock auto $10 so no bogus trip to the dealership.. unfortunately they did not have vacuum lines in stock for my car.. i have several vacuum leaks.. i jus could not hear the other ones with the loudest one that was causing my car to die at idle.. i will be posting pics as i going to change the uim gaskets .as i can hear hissing very loudly from the uim.. my pics will be for a gen 3 98 taurus dohc so if any1 out there with the gen 3 needs pics email me or pm [email protected], other gens are similar but for the noobs like me, i needed exact pics.. thank you all again excellent resource. a noob with his first car.. fell in love with the Taurus
 

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All, my experience, for the good of the group. 96 Ford LX Duratec, lean codes and rough idle. I took it to a local shop and they patched the vacuum system together and claimed it was good to go, only to have the problem return again. Take it to the experts and they will fix it in half the time and get you back on the road, right ?? wrong. Tamara, my Taurus, was not having it. I took some time off and spent rebuilding the vacuum lines out of new rubber, the old hard plastic lines just broke and cracked everytime you touched them. The cost of the hose, assortments of plastic tees and small clamps to insure a good seal was what it took. Then she was back on the road again with no issues.

In all I thought it was going to be a sensor or something, it was just a matter of replacing the hoses that did not last past 130K before getting brittle.
 
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