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2001 Ford Taurus, automatic, Code P0133 Oxygen Sensor Bank 1, Sensor 1
I looked on here on how to replace it, found some info, but several years old. Followed one link, but all I got was some rambling about having to buy a special wrench, nothing informative
1. Where is this sensor located
2. will a replacement (NKD NTK) be as good as a OEM?
Thanks

Heinz
 

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1. I believe bank one is located in the exhaust manifold on the firewall side.
2. Not sure. I get mine here:
http://oxygensensors.com/
I replaced the bank 2 (front) sensor in about 10 minutes with a regular combination wrench. Not sure how hard the back one is to reach.
Good luck
 

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Bank 1 is the firewall, bank 2 is the radiator side. You do need the special wrench for the rear O2 sensor, because there is literally ZERO room to get in a traditional wrench.

As for where it is...take a look at the exhaust manifold. It'll have a big barrel sticking out of it, with a pigtail harness. That's the upstream O2 sensor. The downstream sensors are under the car, just aft of the catalytic converters.

An NGK O2 sensor will be fine. IIRC, the OEM sensors are made by NGK.

JR
 

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A couple of years ago, I made use of my local Advance Auto "Loan-A-Tool" program, to use the short offset socket in their O2 sensor socket kit, to remove the firewall (bank one), before cat O2 sensor, on my 94 3.8L. I also replaced the bank 2 (radiator side) before cat O2 sensor, as O2 sensors should be replaced in matched pairs. I chose Bosch & they are doing fine.

The before cat O2 sensors are located in the exhaust manafold down pipe, ahead of the cat converter/s. As has been said, the rear O2 sensor is in a restricted space & that special short off-set O2 sensor socket sure came in handy when replacing mine.
The front (bank-2) O2 sensor was easy to get at on my 3.8L.

If you plan on beginning to turn your own wrenches & don't have a repair manual, or CD, they are a good investment imo.
If you don't want to spring for one, you might check your local library for samples of various publications, or to review different publishers repair approach, to see which one best meets your needs, before purchase.

Be sure to apply a high temp nickel loaded anti-sieze compound to the O2 sensors threads & be careful not to get any on the sensor itself, so as not to risk contaminating it & corrupting it's PID output to the computer.

Let us know how it goes.
 

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I almost spend a lot bucks on on replacing a sensor and so I learn to test it first if it really has failed."It's very likely someone read the DTC (diagnostic trouble codes) that cited an oxygen sensor reading - but then said something that leads you to believe it's a failed/bad sensor and needs replacing. The vast majority of times that is NOT the problem.But last year I got the same code as yours."

The oxygen sensor is located below the engine in the exhaust pipe before the catalytic converter and muffler. It is mounted in the pipe with wires going to it. You need a special socket to remove it in most cases but sometimes you can do it with a wrench. When replacing it be sure to put anti seize lubricant on the threads so it can be serviced again in the future.

I've relied on this DIY procedure

I've replaced the upstream O2 sensors on a 2005 Duratec without removing the upper air intake manifold. Critical procedure is to disconnect the plug with only the left hand on the rear sensor. By touch as it can't be seen for disconnect. Practice on the front sensor so you understand how the release works. Takes some patience. I used a standard O2 socket and 1/2 inch drive to remove the sensor. It came easily but if a sensor has been installed for 100k miles or more may need to warm by running the engine for 5 - 10 seconds and penetrating fluid to help. I change at 100k, when smog tests indicate a rise in HC or NO, or Car Chip shows the LTFT not to be where I want it. Upstream O2 sensors are critical to performance and mpg. Cost was $42 per Bosch sensor online. Add a little antiseize to the upper threads/shoulder. Not on the tip.

O2 sensor replacement-auto repair manuals

 

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a quick question any help would be appreciated.. i went to autozone before i knew of this website or rockauto.com and i bought 1 oxygen sensor for my duratec 1998.. it was listed as the "upper left-stream" sensor. on rockauto ,motorcraft are listed as "front" and "rear" as for the BOSCH Part # 13117
OE Type - Exact Fit
Two required; 4 Wire; Heated; OE Type - Exact Fit - Upstream Sensor....my question is would the "left" and "right" b interchangeable? thanks in advance
 

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Since the description says "two required", I suppose "left" and "right" are identical. Since you bought it from a local store, if it doesn't fit (different wire length), you can take it back.
 

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The O2 sensors lead length may affect interchangeability.

O2 sensors should be replaced in matched pairs, with the same type/sensitivity as the OEM sensor, for best results.

Don't forget to apply a good quality high temp nickel loaded anti-sieze compound to the O2 sensors threads. Don't get any on the sensors tip.
 

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I still haven't been able to get mine broke loose yet.I tried WD40 overnight, started the car and let it run for about 15 minutes, still it'd froze tight. I boght the 7/8" O2 adapter, however, i can't get it to budge, all it does is twist so hard the tool slips. Any other ideas to get it to come loose? The car has about 136,000 miles.
 

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Sounds like you've run into a stubborn one. Maybe try a torch around it's threads, some vibration & some Kroil, made by Kano Labs. it's available on line & many industrial supply houses stock it. Not cheap stuff but good.

Don't round off the O2 sensors hex head, or you may end up at a welding shop having them cut out the bung holding the sensor & welding in a new one in.

Kinda sounds like the old sensor didn't have any, or enough anti-sieze on it's threads, or you live & drive where they heavily salt the roads in winter.
Not much salt used where I live, so the factory sensors on 94 3.8L came right out a couple of years ago. I used extra nickel loaded high temp anti-sieze compound on the threads, being careful not to get any on the sensors tip, lest it become contaminated!!!!

So maybe apply some Kroil, let it sit for a few minutes, apply some heat around the bung to help draw it in. Apply more Kroil as the heat draws it in & wait a bit for it to penetrate & break the rust down, then try removing it. If it doesn't budge, repeat the process with some vibration, but don't apply so much torque that the tool slips & rounds the hex off, or you'll end up at the welding shop.

Good luck, let us know how it goes.
 

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Yeah it's pretty stubborn. It's not budging any. Yes, I live in WV where it's basically salty roads from November through March really. So at this point, I really don't know what to do with it now. If I could get a regular socket on it where it doesn't spread open under torque it wouldn't be so bad. Just aggravates me cause the car went from averaging 27 mpg down to 22 and getting worse and I can't afford that now.
 

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Sounds like you don't have a hardened socket, so maybe turck on over to your favorite Advance Auto, AZ, ect & make use of their "Loan-A-Tool" program. The socket in the Advance Auto set I used was hardened steel, the kind used with air tools, so it was plenty heavy & hardened so it wouldn't spread, when torque was applied.

OR , maybe run this puppy by a welding shop & let them put some serious heat & torque on it & see if it'll give. If it won't, they can cut it out, weld a new threaded bung in the down pipe & install your new O2 sensor for you.

I'm origonally from down in McDowell county, but back then we didn't salt roads, heck they didn't even plow them back then, just drive on it until it packed down real good & use chains!!!!! lol

Let us know how it goes.
 

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Ok, here's the update actually. I took the top side engine mount/dampener off. "Accidentally" broke off the top of the clip trying to get a 7/8" wrench over the plug. Luckily for me, there was enough hex head left to get a good bite on it from the wrench. It gave me approximately 1/2" of room to turn it. Mind you I'm 6'3" 230lbs. I used every bit of strength I had by holding the wrench in my left hand and holding on to the other side of the engine with my right hand and pulled as hard as humanly possible. I finally hear a loud pop/squeak. it was enough of a turn to get it broke loose. Then I used the O2 socket to turn it from there on out. The threads were unbelievably rusted to the manifold. But it is out and the new one in.
 

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OK, good to hear you were able to MAN it out!!!! lol

Hope you buttered some good high temp anti-sieze on those threads.

Don't forget to disconnect the battery B- cable, to wipe the computers KAM memory, so it can begin to build new fuel trim tables with the new O2 sensors.

To avoid driveability problems & have the computer relearn it's cold & warm idle strategy, turn off all electrical loads, start the engine cold, let it idle down some then slowly shift into All gears including "R", so that you feel each one engage, before moving on, ending in "N" or "P".
Then without turning anything on, or moving the throttle or gear shift, let it fully warm up. Then slowly shift into All gears again. The remainder can usually be learned without driveability problems, as you drive in town & on the highway.
If not, post back & I'll post a link to Fords full relearn cycle, it's a bit lengthly & complicated, but can be completed on some lightly used roads. I get by using the cold & warm idle relearn cycle though.
 
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