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Discussion Starter #1
OK.
I replaced the Thermostat last year (2 times)
I have replaced the heater hose, as it had a hole in it.
I used this.

As directed, just in case it was a header gasket issues.
And this is the findings.

After doing the "K&W Head Gasket and Block Repair"
I let the car idle for 35 minutes.
The temp gauge stayed steady at normal (Center)
I drove the car around for about 10 minutes.
the last mile to the house, I cut on the AC.
When I did that, about 1/2 mile from the house the temp gauge started to rise.
by the time I got to the house, it was near about on H
I cut the car off, popped the hood.
The water was starting to boil in the Fill Tank.
However, it was not overflowing, as I got to it in time, before that could happen.

Both Radiator Fans were on, they actually came on about 15 minutes after I cranked the car up, and let it idle, so they were doing what they supposed to do.

Any idea's on WHAT the issue could be now?

Could it be the Thermostat is no good?
(If that is the case, it is out of warranty by one month believe that.)

The water pump seemed to be good, I had it off last year, and it had all its teeth, and everything looked good on it.

I am at a loss.
I am supposed to be taking a trip in September and unless I get this car running right, I cannot go anywhere. (It is my mother's car, so I am stuck here until that damn thing is running right)

idea's and suggestions are so very welcome...

Wayne
 

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Your radiator could be plugged. How was the condition of the coolant. If you have boiling in the tank and no coolant coming from the cap you should try a new cap and look for cracks in the bottle.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
#1: Radiator could be plugged
More information on this one would be great.
However, if it was plugged or whatever you are referring too, would it not cause an issue before the AC, I mean the car ran for nearly 40 minutes before I cut on the AC.

#2: new Ford Cap (Just purchased it the other month from the Ford Dealership)
#3: No cracks in the bottle.
#4: Coolant
In this test, I ran straight water, with no coolant, to make sure there were no issues, before dumping coolant in the system.
 

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#1: Radiator could be plugged
More information on this one would be great.
However, if it was plugged or whatever you are referring too, would it not cause an issue before the AC, I mean the car ran for nearly 40 minutes before I cut on the AC.

#2: new Ford Cap (Just purchased it the other month from the Ford Dealership)
#3: No cracks in the bottle.
#4: Coolant
In this test, I ran straight water, with no coolant, to make sure there were no issues, before dumping coolant in the system.
AC puts more load on the engine but it also heats the air going into the radiator because the condenser is releasing heat and it is right in front of the radiator. If the radiator passages are partial plugged this extra heat load can cause the engine to over heat.

You can also test for combustion gas in the coolant bottle. If it is there then you have a headgasket issue.


Also you can do a compression test on all the cylinders.
 

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Your radiator could be plugged up inside. Or it could be blocked on the outside-stuff between the fins. Think about all your radiator is trying to do in hot weather. Keeping the engine and transmission cool is a tall order. It may be that adding the engine load and the heat from the a/c condensor puts the cooling system over the edge.

How many miles on the car? Is it still on it's original radiator? I guess first thing to do (w/ the a/c off!) is to take it to a radiator shop or someplace like Meineke or Midas and have the cooling system chemically flushed and have them eyeball the fins. If you need a new radiator, get the heaviest duty one you can afford. I changed mine this spring and it's not something I'd want to do again.

If you do need to replace the radiator, there's a secret to getting those damned trans tubes out of the radiator. You heat them with a propane torch til the plastic keepers melt then you can pull the tubes out. Doesn't damage the tubes and you will get new keepers with the replacement radiator.
 

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Is it TRULY boiling up? or by random chance air bubbles escaping from somewhere? could mess up the thermostat from opening?

Idk... I know you said you had checked the water pump, but I had an Old T bird doing the exact same thing---turned out to be the pump
 

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I agree with everyone above.

Radiator partially clogged is the #1 culprit.
Checking Water pump would be prudent because it can be the leading cause of a clogged rad.

Water pump impeller shrapnel getting caught in the rad passages, catching the rust flakes from the engine, dump a bottle of seal a butt in the mix.. and I bet the rad is just goobered all to hell inside.

Cools fine everywhere until you add the heat load of the condenser into the mix, grab ya some skrimps cos you gonna be boiling.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
@IkeNewton
I removed the water pump back last year.
And tested the car then for about a week, and during that time.
The issues still remained. The car continued to overheat just
As before with the original pump in place.

The Original Pump's fins are in great shape, and are taller than
The fins on the replacement pump.
After that week, I swapped the pump back up and put the original
Back in the car.
So, the pump is not the issue here.
@Riptides and anyone,everyone else
What is the best way to find out IF the Radiator is the issue?

Thanks, all.
Wayne
 

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Since all that stuff likes to settle at the bottom of the rad, and rust just LOVES to make more rust..

Drain the system, if you try the drain plug and nothing comes out.. clogged.

If it drains, then look for how orange or how much crud comes out, very orangy very cruddy/flakey, probably clogged.
(let me add here, if it's really clogged, it would start draining and possibly clog up before fully drained)

If you do that and want more confirmation, pull the lower radiator hose and try to see up in there, which is impossible, but at least you tried.. So poke around up in there with a long flat head with a magnetic tip (or a magnet pen tool). Treat her gentle like an inexperienced lady, don't go jabbing up in there like she's an $80 an hour pro and you're trying to get your moneys worth.

If you can dig flakes, chunks, and other crap out.. probably clogged.

You MAY be able to back flush it out yourself, or have a shop do it, but if it's that BAD.. might be time for a new one..
(OR you could remove it from the car, flip it upside down, and try to hammer water in there, like hose on hard stream and pulse it, spray, off, spray, off, spray, off.. etc)

And honestly I'd just store what I said in the back of your mind and go check out "ChrisFix" on youtube along with "radiator flush" in the search, he does a good job of showing layman ways of determining cooling system health and flushing yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
@Riptides
I have done a full drain on the system 2 times.
Once before doing the "K&W Head Gasket and Block Repair"
And then once after.
Each time, I drained the system completely, and it took about 45 minutes each time to completely drain.
Each time, there was no rust, and no orange looking anything coming out of it.
The only thing that came out the first time I drained it, was the leftover settlement from the radiator powder that I put in it last summer to stop a leak that it had, and just regular water mixed with antifreeze. Other than that, nothing.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
@Riptides
I have done a full drain on the system 2 times.
Once before doing the "K&W Head Gasket and Block Repair"
And then once after.
Each time, I drained the system completely, and it took about 45 minutes each time to completely drain.
Each time, there was no rust, and no orange looking anything coming out of it.
The only thing that came out the first time I drained it, was the leftover settlement from the radiator powder that I put in it last summer to stop a leak that it had, and just regular water mixed with antifreeze. Other than that, nothing.

When I first unscrew the white plug, it starts to drizzle out.
Then I remove the Fill-Tank cap, and it floods out like it is supposed to.
It continues to stream out a constant stream until there is no more water in the system. Which takes about 45 minutes.
No rust, no orange color, not flakes, no nothing.
 

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Carrz,

Would you be able to do a longer radiator flush. What I mean is drain the radiator again and flush till it runs clear water from your garden hose then drain that. Add a bottle or even two bottles of Blue Devil Radiator Flush , or Peak Radiator Flush then fill with water again from the garden hose. Drive it for a 3 or 4 days being sure to watch that temp guage. Try to put a couple of hundred miles on it allowing the flushing chemicals to really do a thorough job. I did this to my 96 Ford for a full week and was very surprised by the amount of junk that was cleaned out of the system. I then followed the Chris Fix flushing method until everything ran clean and clear. If the A/C was never turned on does the car not overheat or will it at some point (longer than 45 minute drive) will that tempt guage start heading to the H even if the A/C is not turned on. The other question is if you turned the heater on to full blast do you get any heat and do you see any drop in the guage when this is done.
 

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It's hard to check for a plugged radiator these days. It use to be you could feel the sections of the radiator for cold spots but with air and electric fans you can't. My thoughts that you used the head sealer and a radiator sealer that could lead to a plugged radiator.

I can tell you the three gallons a minute from a garden hose isn't going to flush anything loose. Where was the leak that you used a radiator sealant on.
 

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What is the best way to find out IF the Radiator is the issue?

Thanks, all.
Wayne
Take it to a radiator shop. They can do a cooling system inspection and tell you what's what.

You've pretty much eliminated the water pump, and probably the thermostat. I'd probably just go buy a radiator in put it in. Autozone sells one with a lifetime guarantee for about $100. To get the old one out, you'll need a couple of jacks--radiator won't make it out without jacking the front of the car up.:eek: Unless the car is actually leaking coolant, sealers don't do much except clog things up. While you've got the radiator out, flush the engine out with fresh water. If your's is like mine was, somebody ran straight tapwater in it and there's probably some rusty stuff in the engine block.

When I did mine, I had asked a repair shop how much to replace the radiator--$300. I don't think they wanted to do it. Nothing too outlandish, other than it comes out and goes in from the bottom.

When you replace the coolant, btw, buy the stuff that needs to be diluted--and buy a gallon of distilled water. The premixed coolant is just a sucker's bet.
 

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After flushing and refilling did you refill with plain water? Driving and diagnosing with plain water means the the coolant will always be near the boiling pt. I would refill with proper mixture. If you need to flush or drain again you can save and reuse most of the coolant, you won't get it all. Should provide a clearer picture of how well it's operating.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Update.
Bought a new Radiator yesterday from Advance, with a lot of coupons and cash backs from my bank and other places, the Rad only cost me a little over $70.00.

Quick Questions, and hopefully there is someone around today that can answer this one.
@Brian in Tucson
When you put the trans lines back in, did you have to remove the new plastic keepers, or did you just pop the lines into place?
The reason, why I am asking, is that I popped the bottom hose on, but the brass outer keeper, will not attach.

Some quick replies will be mighty appreciated, as I am almost completed in installing this thing.
 

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Update.
Bought a new Radiator yesterday from Advance, with a lot of coupons and cash backs from my bank and other places, the Rad only cost me a little over $70.00.

Quick Questions, and hopefully there is someone around today that can answer this one.
@Brian in Tucson
When you put the trans lines back in, did you have to remove the new plastic keepers, or did you just pop the lines into place?
The reason, why I am asking, is that I popped the bottom hose on, but the brass outer keeper, will not attach.

Some quick replies will be mighty appreciated, as I am almost completed in installing this thing.
I think you're supposed to use a quick disconnect tool. I know this has been asked before, try using the search function. Something like "radiator trans lines".
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Hey ice
I think that is just to remove the lines.
I removed them by prying out the plastic keepers, took about 1 minute per line to get them things out and the lines just popped out.

However, the new Plastic Keeper is already in place in the new Radiator, so my question is, on rather you just pop the lines in, OR, do you have
To remove the keepers and place it over the lines and then popped it in.
As the flanged part of the line is on the outside, and I do not remember if it was on the outside or inside of the older radiator.
The brass keepers will not connect on the outside, to the nut on the radiator.
So, will the line stay in place?
It is rather snug.
 

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Hey ice
I think that is just to remove the lines.
I removed them by prying out the plastic keepers, took about 1 minute per line to get them things out and the lines just popped out.

However, the new Plastic Keeper is already in place in the new Radiator, so my question is, on rather you just pop the lines in, OR, do you have
To remove the keepers and place it over the lines and then popped it in.
As the flanged part of the line is on the outside, and I do not remember if it was on the outside or inside of the older radiator.
The brass keepers will not connect on the outside, to the nut on the radiator.
So, will the line stay in place?
It is rather snug.
If I remember right, its easier to place the keepers on the line and then insert them that way than the inverse.
 
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