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Discussion Starter #1
Today i was putting on a new caliper and caliper bracket. I read my Haynes manual, and bled the brakes as it said. But after i was finished i have absoultely no brake pressure. So i bled it another 4 times. and i still have no pressure. So i called a mechanic and he said that since i have an ABS system on my car it has to be professionally bled using a bleeding machine. is this true?
 

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ok heres what i did. My brother was in the car and pumped the brakes. he then held it half way down. I loosened the nut, and let some of the fluid flow out. i tightened the nut back up and repeated the proceedure numerous times. I did have the resevoiur cap on when i did it. did i miss something?
 

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Did you top off the master cylinder with fluid every 3-4 pedal strokes? If not, you were probably pumping air into the lines. As soon as the fluid level gets low in the master cylinder, you are running the risk of pumping air into the brake lines.

It sounds like you are doing it right, but just to be sure...

1) Top off the MC with fresh fluid.
2) Go to the farthest caliper from the MC (if you are bleeding the entire system, that would be RR, if just the fronts, that would be RF)
3) Crack the bleeder screw loose, but don't unscrew it. Attach short piece of 1/4" ID hose. I use a small bottle to collect the old fluid for disposal.
4) Have assistant push pedal (not too hard) and make sure they hold it down until you tell them otherwise.
5) While assistant is pushing the pedal, open the bleeder screw, allowing fluid to bleed out. When the pedal reaches the floor, fluid flow will stop. Screw the bleeder screw shut.
6) Once the bleeder is closed, say "UP" so your assistant knows to release the pedal.
7) Repeat 4-6 approximately four times. Check the MC fluid level. Top off if necessary. Repeat 4-6 another four times. Top off MC, move on to next caliper.

At least that's how I used to do it, before I installed SpeedBleeders. Also note that brake fluid absorbs moisture from the air fairly rapidly. Never leave the MC cap off for more than a minute or so, especially in humid weather.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
so i attatch the tubing ontop of the bleeder screw? second the haynes manual stated that if you disconnected the brake line at the caliper that you would only have to bleed that one line.
 

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When bleeding the brakes, you have to close the bleeder valve while the brake pedal is fully depressed, otherwise you end up with no brakes. I just went through this when replacing the rear caliper on my SHO, and I was even using a one man bleeder kit that doesn't let air into the system (so far as I know). Not quite sure why this is the case, but it seemed to work for me.

If you see me post that I wrecked my car, and anything about not being able to stop... well, you know what happened. :p
 

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Oh, my bad..... I cut your brake lines while you weren't looking..... Looks like you survived, darn! :p


I just bled my brakes today. I replaced the two front calipers, added rear bias plugs, and replaced all the old DOT 3 with Valvoline Synthetic DOT 4.

AutoZone (etc) carries a small device called a "One Man Brake Bleeder." They work great and cost around $7-12.

But with two people its quite simple also. SixFo's instructions are correct. I suggest using CLEAR tubing so you can see what is coming out. As the brake pedal is depressed, observe for air bubbles. Continue to bleed that brake until there are no more air bubbles.

Also, brake fluid should be changed every 1-2 years. Brake fluid should have a LIGHT amber/yellow color. If it is brown or dark, then it needs to be changed.

My old Morris had 4 wheel drum brakes WITHOUT power assist. They required regular maintenance and I became very proficient at bleeding brakes.
 

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Originally posted by SixFoFalcon@May 27 2004, 04:35 PM
5) While assistant is pushing the pedal, open the bleeder screw, allowing fluid to bleed out. When the pedal reaches the floor, fluid flow will stop. Screw the bleeder screw shut.
6) Once the bleeder is closed, say "UP" so your assistant knows to release the pedal.
Pretty important there. You don't have to have the screw torqued, but make sure you snug them up good. This may be where you're getting air in the lines. And don't use Teflon tape on the screw, if any part of the tape comes off, you'll clog the lines, and possibly lose that brake's stopping power.
 

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Originally posted by JasonBVHS@May 29 2004, 04:21 PM
what would you recommend to seal up around the screw?
Nothing... if there is a leak between the bleeder screw and the caliper, you need a new caliper.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Just a quick question. after pumping my brakes i could hear a noise, like the air reaching the surface of the reseviour. is this the air that is still in the line, or does it mean that my brakes were pulling in air?
 
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