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You guys are over-reacting about this rotor issue.

You're thinking that it's only the thickness of a rotor that gets measured, but there's also lateral runout, as well as high/low spots. If the rotor wasn't properly seasoned, it's possible that pad material built up on the rotor surface, then cooled, and formed a high spot.

When they 'resurfaced' the rotor, they likely just removed them, gave them a quick grind to get rid of any high spots, and reinstalled. This was caused by what you people would call 'warped' rotors. In reality, there is no such thing as 'warped' rotors, but as I said before, pad material can build up and form high spots, which would cause what you were feeling.

As for 'reduced rotor life,' that's a non-issue. If there was any reduction in life, it was, at most, a couple hundred miles. It's certainly no reason to become a pain to a dealership. Remember, in the future, if there's a big issue, a dealership will be more willing to work with you if you have a good relationship with them. While it's purely anecdotal, a buddy of mine had a transmission replaced in his Excursion at 100k miles for $250, BECAUSE he had a good relationship with the dealer. I bought my Mustang from this dealer, and they've always been good to me, so I don't nickel and dime them for stupid stuff like this.

JR
"Nickel & dime them"??? For crissakes, the man bought a brand new car and he should settle for a band aid fix??? For that kind of money, for BRAND NEW EVERYTHING, I would demand what I paid for, let alone kiss THEIR butt for a band-aid repair of flawed product. Ford should be kissing the butt of ANYBODY that buys a new Taurus after what they did to US with 3.8L Essex's and SHO camshafts! I would want new rotors and a wash! Job #1????
 

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Ici

"The only fix for extensive uneven deposits involves dismounting the discs and having them Blanchard ground - not expensive, but inconvenient at best. A newly ground disc will require the same sort of bedding in process as a new disc. The trouble with this procedure is that if the grinding does not remove all of the cementite inclusions, as the disc wears the hard cementite will stand proud of the relatively soft disc and the thermal spiral starts over again. Unfortunately, the cementite is invisible to the naked eye.
Taking time to properly bed your braking system pays big dividends but, as with most sins, a repeat of the behavior that caused the trouble will bring it right back."
 
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