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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So here is my idea on what i want to do and would like opinions.

I am going to suck all of the fluid i can out of the pan through the dipstick, measure how much i take out and replace the 1st batch with Castrol Mercon V since some of this new fluid will be wasted in the mix.

Going to drive it around for a little while, maybe a run on the highway to get the new fluid mixed with the old. Then going to suck the pan again and replace it with Mobil 1 ATF for that batch.

Going to drive around some more and do this 1 more time with Mobil 1 ATF. Or until i use up 12 Qts of M1 and 6 quarts of Castrol.

After this i will keep up on it a little better by replacing whats in the pan every so many miles.

I am trying to avoid dropping the pan or taking any hoses off.

Thoughts?
 

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I was skeptical of the at home, cooler line method of flushing. But, when you actually do it, it is so simple and easy. I did both my Taurus and my sister-in-law's Sable in the same weekend. When I did it, I pumped out 3 quarts then added three quarts. Repeated this until I got fresh, clean fluid coming out, buttoned everything up, then topped off the trans as needed. Do the tried and true method, it works for a reason.
 

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Manufacturers recommendation:
(this is a flush only procedure, does not cover filter replacement)

Transaxle Fluid Drain and Refill
SPECIAL SERVICE TOOL(S) REQUIRED
Description Tool Number
Disconnect Tool T82L-9500-AH

Normal maintenance and lubrication requirements necessitate periodic automatic transmission fluid changes at 48,000 km (30,000 miles) or 34,000 km (21,000 miles) severe duty.

1. Place the transaxle range selector lever in park and set the parking brake.
2. Note: The amount of fluid (fluid level) in the transaxle will affect the time it takes to drain the transaxle. Make sure to check the transaxle fluid level before proceeding.
Start engine and check transaxle fluid level.
3. Turn engine off.
4. Note: If the vehicle is equipped with an air suspension system, the switch must be placed in the off position before raising the vehicle.
Raise and suitably support vehicle.
5. Remove the retainer clip from the lower transaxle fluid cooler line and fitting.
6. Note: On vehicles equipped with 5/16 inch cooler lines, use Disconnect Tool T82L-9500-AH to disconnect the transaxle cooler line. Place the tool on the cooler line and push the tool into the cooler line fitting. This action releases the plastic retaining tabs which holds the cooler in place. Then, pull the cooler line from the transaxle cooler line fitting at the transaxle fluid cooler. On vehicle with 3/8 inch cooler lines, pinch the plastic retaining tabs of the push connect fitting and pull the cooler line to separate it from the cooler line fitting.
Disconnect the lower transaxle cooler line from the transaxle cooler line fitting at the transaxle.
7. Attach a flexible hose approximately 0.9 meters (3.0 feet) in length to the end of the transaxle cooler line and gently fasten the hose with a hose clamp.
8. Place the opposite end of the flexible hose into a suitable 14.2 liter (15 quart) container.
9. Note: When plugging the transaxle cooler line fitting, make sure the plug is made of soft material to prevent damage to the internal seal of the cooler line fitting.
Insert a plug into the transaxle cooler line fitting at the transaxle to prevent any residual fluid leakage.
10. Lower vehicle.
11. Note: When the steady stream of transaxle fluid stops flowing the engine should be turned off to prevent damage to the transaxle. Engine rpm should not exceed curb idle speed while draining transaxle fluid.
Place the transaxle range selector lever in park and start the engine. Run the engine at idle while observing the flexible hose attached to the transaxle cooler line. Run the engine at idle speed for approximately 40-60 seconds until the steady stream of transaxle fluid stops flowing. This step will drain approximately 1.9-2.8 liters (2-3 quarts).
12. Fill the transaxle with 9.5 liters (10 quarts of Motorcraft MERCON® Automatic Transmission Fluid or equivalent meeting MERCON® specification.
13. Note: When the steady stream of fluid stops flowing the engine should be turned off to prevent damage to the transaxle. Engine rpm should not exceed curb idle speed while draining fluid.
Place the gearshift lever in park and start the engine. Run the engine at idle while observing the flexible hose attached to the fluid cooler line. Run the engine at idle speed for approximately 2-3 minutes until the steady stream of transmission fluid stops flowing. This step will drain approximately 9.5 liters (10 quarts).
14. Raise and suitably support vehicle.
15. Remove the plug from the transaxle cooler line fitting at the transaxle.
Remove the flexible hose from the cooler line.
16. Note: Carefully clean the cooler line before installing it to ensure a good connection and to prevent fluid leaks.
Install the cooler line into the transaxle cooler fitting by pushing straight into the cooler line fitting until a click is heard. Then, gently pull on the cooler line to make sure the line is locked in place in the cooler line fitting.
17. Install the retaining clip over the cooler line and fitting.
18. Lower vehicle.
19. Add 1.9 liters (2 quarts) of Motorcraft MERCON® Automatic Transmission Fluid or equivalent meeting MERCON® specification.
20. Place the gearshift lever (7210) in park, apply the parking brake and start the engine. Move the gearshift lever through all ranges allowing the transaxle to engage in each position and return gearshift lever to PARK.
21. Check the transaxle fluid level. The fluid level at normal operating temperature should read within the crosshatched area of the fluid level indicator (7A020). If the fluid level reads below the crosshatched area of the fluid level indicator, adjust the fluid level by adding fluid in 0.2 liter (1/2 pint) increments until the correct fluid level is obtained.
22. Place the air suspension switch to the on position (if equipped).
 

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A couple of observations....

By NOT dropping the pan you can't clean the magnet or change the filter. I'm not sure if these are a concern you?

Furthermore, you may want to verify the Mobil-1 ATF is Mercon V compatible. As your post is written I wouldn't use Mobil-1. I believe at one time Mobil did make Mercon V (synthetic) but I don't think that's the case today.

The only brand name I'm aware of that makes full synthetic Mercon V is Red Line D4 Synthetic ATF. D4 is Mercon V compatible. Pricey stuff but hey so is your transmission.

Monsoon
 

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What others have said..... Just do the flush in the Wiki. First time may take you 2+ hours. Easy and kind of fun, but a bit messy. DIY takes less total time than taking the car somewhere and spending MUCH more $$, and you dont know exactly what they did. I have done "the flush" many many times on many different cars. These days, it takes me around an hour including pan drop and filter change.
 

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^+1. Get one of those clear Sterilite under-the-bed storage containers at wallyworld or a dollar store for a less messy pan drop. You can get a filter kit at any parts store for $15-20. Be sure to use your original reusable pan gasket. I use a 3/8 in. dr. ratchet to break the pan bolts loose and a 1/4 in. dr. ratchet to reinstall. Some brake cleaner spray and rags to clean the pan, magnet and pan gasket and a small screwdriver and needle-nose pliers to pry and pull out the filter neck seal and youre set. Put a little clean atf on the filter neck seal when reinstalling.
 

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^+1 Read the notes in the Topic Finder about transaxle filter change also, you want to make sure you get ALL of the old filter out. Whenever I do the first filter change on a new to me Bull I also install a trans. pan drain plug kit. Nice & clean procedure after that!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I do not know where the trans lines are that they talk about in the topic finder and when i posted about it months ago no one posted pics.
 

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Hate to sound sarcastic but, uhm, they would be the 2 steel lines coming off of your transmission. In lieu of actually opening the hood and getting under your car, (you youngsters just can't put that mouse down, can ya?)
here:

Fluid Cooler, Auxiliary
All G3's, typical.

An auxiliary transaxle fluid cooler is used in line with the integral transaxle fluid cooler. This tubular-design transaxle fluid cooler is mounted in front of the A/C condenser core. Transmission fluid flows from the integral transaxle cooler in the radiator into the auxiliary transaxle fluid cooler before returning to the transaxle pump assembly.

The transaxle fluid cooler lines retained to the transaxle and radiator are a push-connect design. A special removal tool is required for all vehicles.


Transaxle Cooler Lines



Item Part Number Description

1 391376-S102 Connector
2 7A030 Fluid Cooler Inlet Tube
3 7A031 Fluid Cooler Tube
4 N807468-S100 Clip
5 376240-S Clamp
6 3D746 Power Steering Fluid Cooler Hose
7 376240-S100 Clamp
8 7A095 Auxiliary Transaxle Fluid Cooler
9 N610958-S56 Bolt
10 7N291 Transmission Oil Cooler Line Clip
11 N623332-S56 Clip Nut
12 N807397-S101 Clip
13 W611624-S428 Bolt
14 7D273 Oil Tube Connector
15 7R041 Grommet
16 7C410 Transaxle Fluid Cooler Tube
17 7N110 Connector
A -- Tighten to 3-4 N-m (24-32 Lb-In)
 

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I have done "the flush" many many times on many different cars.
Are all these "many different cars" bulls? Or are they of different models or even different makes?

I ask this because I am wondering if I can do the home flush on Honda's and Toyota's, the other two makes my family owns.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thank you for everyones advice. I will probably be looking at doing a gentle flush in the future when i do my tranny filter next time but for now i am doing what i had planned in post 1. I do consider everyone's advice but i already purchased extra fluid for this procedure and the hand pump which is working really well.

What i would like to note for other readers is that the fluid on my dipstick looked good and red and when dabbed on a piece of white paper towel it looks fairly red, but after sucking the pan dry i noticed the contents seemed more on the brownish side of red than i had been lead to believe by the dipstick. This is going to make me do my fluids more often likely.

So far i have been getting between 5.50-6.0 quarts out of the pan through the dipstick and it only takes about 3 minutes to pump it out. I have been refilling each time with about 5.50 quarts of the Castrol Mercon V and so far have done this twice. I have taken it about 8 miles of driving and some good idling after filling with fresh fluid and it was evident after the first suck-and-fill that the fluid was well mixed from my short drive as it was still showing some light brown in the red.

I have about 9 quarts of fluid left but am only going to do this one more time now and probably going to just suck the pan dry and re-fill every so many miles to keep fresh fluid in the system.

I can tell from the 11 fresh quarts of fluid that went into the system that my WOT shifts and slow start shifts are much smoother. Will let you guys know if anything funny happens.

Once again thanks for all the info, i didn't just write it all off without taking time to think about it. For now i have managed to stay on the top side of the car with little mess.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Okay so the job is finished! Finished my 3rd suck-n-fill off with 6 fresh quarts of Mobil 1 ATF. So i have a good mix mostly new Castrol Mercon V and 6 quarts of the M1. I have heard some say the M1 is not Mercon V compatible but it says so on the website and on the bottle and have heard of others using in the past. Either way its now a synthetic blend in there. Seems to shift great now!
 

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Manufacturers recommendation:
(this is a flush only procedure, does not cover filter replacement)

...

11. Note: When the steady stream of transaxle fluid stops flowing the engine should be turned off to prevent damage to the transaxle. Engine rpm should not exceed curb idle speed while draining transaxle fluid.
Place the transaxle range selector lever in park and start the engine. Run the engine at idle while observing the flexible hose attached to the transaxle cooler line. Run the engine at idle speed for approximately 40-60 seconds until the steady stream of transaxle fluid stops flowing. This step will drain approximately 1.9-2.8 liters (2-3 quarts).

12. Fill the transaxle with 9.5 liters (10 quarts of Motorcraft MERCON® Automatic Transmission Fluid or equivalent meeting MERCON® specification.
Can somebody explain how you initially drain out only 2-3 quarts of ATF and then are able to get 10 quarts put back in without overflowing something?!? I've got a 2004 Duratec... is the procedure the same?

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Step 13 drains 10 quarts of fluid. You ARE overfilling the pan, but its going right back out so its not a problem i guess.
 

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^^^^ +1
Yes it is overfilling the pan, but isnt exactly coming right back out. It goes thru the TC first, which flushes the old fluid out of the TC. Most of the fluid in any automatic is held in the TC.
 

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Step 13 drains 10 quarts of fluid. You ARE overfilling the pan, but its going right back out so its not a problem i guess.
^^^^ +1
Yes it is overfilling the pan, but isnt exactly coming right back out. It goes thru the TC first, which flushes the old fluid out of the TC. Most of the fluid in any automatic is held in the TC.

I know step 13 drained it out again but I have a had time believing that you're going to ram 8 extra quarts into the transmission. That is a lot of volume. I have read numerous threads on this topic here and I thought that I had run across someone who ran into trouble and overfilled to the point where it was coming out of the dipstick. I could be wrong... might have been another forum since I plan on doing this to my Caravan and Acura TL also. :p

Have either of you two (or anyone else for that matter) actually manage to do this (add 8 extra quarts) on a Gen 4 vehicle.

I just might take the conservative route and simply drain out 2 or three quarts at a time and then refill.

Thanks for your opinions!!!
 
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