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Have a 2006 taurus,what's difference between a regular 3.0 and a Vulcan 3.0 how do I know if I have a Vulcan engine?
 

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From the Solutions To Common Problems Forum:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Have a 2006 taurus,what's difference between a regular 3.0 and a Vulcan 3.0 how do I know if I have a Vulcan engine?
Have a u so means Vulcan motor what does Vulcan motor mean?
 

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The Vulcan is a 3.0 OHV 6 cylinder. It is the engine most commonly found in a Taurus, rugged and reliable. It is the 'regular' 3.0, standard equipment. The DOHC 3.0 was the optional upgrade
 

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The Ford 3.0L V6 engine is one of the most widely used engines in the Ford lineup. ... A basic push-rod OHV design, the engine quickly became known for its reliability. Ford took this to heart and started using the 3.0L in any car or truck it would fit into.
Quote from search.
When Ford designed and came to market with the Taurus in '86 it was for Ford "do or die". GM came to market half ready and failed. They had to design a new engine and it had to be right the first time. They borrowed designs from the small block V-8 from '62 so well proven, valve train, pistons, pins, cooling and such. They did not push the engine hard so it was all basic iron and modest power. Reliability was key. The stretch for Ford was multiport fuel injecton. Others used throttle body injection. Very few issues with fuel injection. Like any engine, it needed maintenance. I had 3. '87, '88, '90. All went my kids when I needed another for work
-chart-
 

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2001 Taurus SES Sedan in Chestnut
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Ford was always known for the pushrod motor, strong, dependable, and little more hp than advertised, just change the oil Religiously and the motor will last a very long time.
 

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Ford was always known for the pushrod motor, strong, dependable, and little more hp than advertised, just change the oil Religiously and the motor will last a very long time.
Ford was a leader in OHC as in the mogular 4.6 V-8 out in '92.I had 3 Lin Cont DOHC engines.
GM designed from scratch pushrod V-6 came to market in '06 and phased out after '11. Pushed the limits of pushrods, VVT makes for good torque. Very compact, easy to work on, simple access.
Pushrods for automobiles is a thing of the past.
I have a 3.9 in my Buick Lucerne. Compact engine in a full sized car. Nice engine for old coot (me) kind of car. Lots of low end torque. I have/had 7 DOHC Ford products. No problems.
-chart-
 

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Agree the 3.0 is tough, 1999 Sable 146K wife lost the serp belt, 98F with mom and kids in the car, got on the interstate to drive fast to keep the engine cool, not realizing the car has a transverse engine. Drove it 16 miles before the battery drained, warped both cylinder heads. Pair from LKQ and she was back in business, also killed the transmission a month later. Installed Ford reman unit and still drive it today 289K. She could have pulled into the Burger King across the street....
 

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The Vulcan is easy to work on, but my understanding is that it requires a bit more regular maintenance. Particularly the cooling system, since it is an iron block. I think that is something a lot of people might neglect.
 

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Temp gauge should be 1/2 or a little bit higher, you may be low on coolant (you said that you saw coolant leaking or on the ground), best thing to do is go to advance or AutoZone and do a pressure test to see where the leak is, if not visible it's the heater core unit or hose connections. Over the course of the year, as my dealer mechanic says and because it has an iron block, you have to use convectional antifreeze, Not the Long Life or for all types(made for all aluminum engine), I made that mistake and had to flush the motor and heater core out 4 times to get all of the sludge out, now I only have to do 1 good flush, on average, when I see the coolant starts to get discolored. Remember to reverse flush the core out a few times, And I Can't Stress Enough to use Convectional Antifreeze. If you smell antifreeze in the car and when you're driving, then it's the heater core (passenger side floor will be moist or wet) Good Luck
 
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