Taurus Car Club of America : Ford Taurus Forum banner

1 - 20 of 45 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As far as I know, I get pretty good gas mileage with my taurus and everything is in working order now after some repairs(sychronizer/dpfe sensor). I was wondering if there are any mods that I can put on the car that will show a decent increase in mpg that are hopefully fairly inexpensive(less than $100). I would like to get my city up a little if possible but highway mostly as I have a 600 mile trip one way to school.
It has had a full tuneup done recently (spark plugs(iridium Autolites), Oil Change, Fuel and Air Filter).
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,588 Posts
Tires at max inflation listed on the sidewall (free).

Drive like there is an egg between the gas pedal and your foot (free).

Limit short trips, combine short trips whenever possible (free).

Anticipate stop lights / signs and coast down as much as possible before hitting the brakes (free).

Be sure coolant is reaching the correct operating temp and engine warms up as fast as possible. (Possible new Motorcraft thermostat)

Drive at the speed limit on the highway (free). The horsepower needed to push a car thru the air is proportional to the cube of the cars speed assuming turbulent flow (Reynolds number over 2000 or so)

Carry as little excess weight as possible (free).

As far as cheap mods, like a fancy air filter, "designer" spark plugs like Splitfire, loud exhaust from a "free flowing" muffler with no other expensive exhaust mods, etc, none of these will impact MPG.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
As far as cheap mods, like a fancy air filter, "designer" spark plugs like Splitfire, loud exhaust from a "free flowing" muffler with no other expensive exhaust mods, etc, none of these will impact MPG.
i will say that for the most part, jeff is right on these things. however when it comes to plugs, you wont really know unless you try them. for instance E3 diamond fire plugs have been shown to increase fuel economy on the dyno, and in real world testing in most applications. but until such time as you actually do the test yourself you wont know. but dont go on just one tankful, you have to do a few tanks to set a baseline, and then make the change, and then run a few more tanks to get a real idea of whether or not things got better.

also you need to make sure that before you make ANY mods that your car is in the best shape possible. the alignment needs to be right on, the engine needs to be running right, etc.

once that has been accomplished, then you can start making changes, one at a time so you dont get confused as to what is working and what isnt. for instance if you change to synthetic oils, and at the same time you install the E3 diamond fire plugs, and you get a 10% increase in economy, you wont know which actually made the difference and by how much.

but in addition to what the others have said, synthetic oils will help.

remove the air intake silencer to improve airflow into the air cleaner

if you have, or can save the money, add an efficient exhaust system, not just a high flow muffler.

you can purchase a tuner to optimize your combination each time you make a change.

some of these are not under $100 though, but they are generally worth the money IF you take a systems approach to your mods.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for the suggestions. I just bought the Autolite XP Iridium spark plugs since I found them for $4.50 with a $2 rebate from RockAuto. As for the car, I just had new tires put on back in March and the allignment is all good still and the only thing I still need to repair, is the rear springs. I purchased a set of Moog springs just am waiting for the $125 to have my mechanic install them. I told him what the professional guy I use quotes and he pretty much cuts it in half.

For the air intake silencer, where is that and is there a certain way to remove it?

Also, for the switch to synthetic oils, I just did an oil change last week so it wouldn't be till the end of summer most likely. Is there anything special I need to do to swap over?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
For the air intake silencer, where is that and is there a certain way to remove it?
you can find it in front of the air cleaner housing, usually in the fender well. if it is like the fox body mustangs, then three bolts hold it in place and it just drops out easily.

Also, for the switch to synthetic oils, I just did an oil change last week so it wouldn't be till the end of summer most likely. Is there anything special I need to do to swap over?
there is no special thing you have to do when changing over to synthetic oil as it is fully compatible with dino oil. in fact you can add synthetic oil to dino oil with no issues if you have to top the level up before you do your next oil change. but you can also switch over to a synthetic transmission fluid as well. the side benefit is that your trans will run a bit cooler when you change over, again nothing special is needed as the fluids are 100% compatible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
374 Posts
Some more of the extreme:

- Remove passenger seat and remove rear seats.
- Remove spare tire and jack/tools.
- Tape up seams/fender gaps.
- Construct a belly pan for underneath the vehicle.
- Empty your washer fluid tank.
- Minimize load on your alternator, charge the battery overnight, keep radio turned off, plug nothing into the cigarette lighter, minimize use of A/C.
- Keep windows rolled up.
- Keep as little gas in the tank as possible until next fill-up.
- Remove door mirrors.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,283 Posts
i will say that for the most part, jeff is right on these things. however when it comes to plugs, you wont really know unless you try them. for instance E3 diamond fire plugs have been shown to increase fuel economy on the dyno, and in real world testing in most applications. but until such time as you actually do the test yourself you wont know. but dont go on just one tankful, you have to do a few tanks to set a baseline, and then make the change, and then run a few more tanks to get a real idea of whether or not things got better.
The E3 plugs have also got a slew of claims filed against them for false advertising, falsified claims, and numerous other complaints. E3s are just a cheap chinese made triple electrode plug with no benefits over a good single electrode plug.

Vacuum leaks will kill your gas mileage, and O2 sensors are maintenance items, and if they are left to long, they can hurt your mileage.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,588 Posts
^^^^ +1 on the E3 plugs. Sure, they may have shown a MPG and HP increase on a big block Chevy or some other random motor when the original, worn out plugs were replaced with brand new E3s, Splitfires, etc. Who knows what they would do in a Ford Vulcan?

IMO, the BEST plugs you can use in an engine for power, economy, and emissions are the plugs recommended by the manufacturer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,425 Posts
Tires at max inflation listed on the sidewall (free).
You have to mention that is NOT safe to inflate tires to any other pressure than the one mentioned in the decal (located in glove compartment or driver door).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
You have to mention that is NOT safe to inflate tires to any other pressure than the one mentioned in the decal (located in glove compartment or driver door).
but if they are not the original tires that come on the car than you have no choice but to go with what is recommended on the side wall of the tire. a 60 series tire doesnt require as much air as say a 40 series tire does. so once you start changing stuff you cant always go by whats recommended from factor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,425 Posts
but if they are not the original tires that come on the car than you have no choice but to go with what is recommended on the side wall of the tire...
Read one more time the sidewall. It doesn't say "recomended" it say "maximum". That means that over that value (hot), the manufacturer doesn't guarantee the tire.
Plus, running with them suprainflated reduces the contact patch and that leads to less braking power, cornering ability, non-uniforme wear... In the end you end up paying more that the eventual gas savings.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,588 Posts
The manufacturers pressure recommendation is based on lots of factors, one of those being a smooth ride. Higher pressures mean a slightly rougher ride.

AFAIK, the max pressure listed on the tire is the max cold inflation pressure. Of course, as the tire heats with driving, pressure wil go up.

With that said, I have been running the tires in all my cars at 34 psi (tires rated at 35 psi max) with zero problems for at least 25 years. No blowouts, no weird tire wear, no tire damage, no handling problems (including in HORRIBLE ice and snow conditions here in the upper midwest). All I notice is a slightly harsher ride and slightly sharper handling. I have never run any kind of gas mileage tests, but it makes sense that less sidwall flex at higher psi = less frictional losses in the tires = slightly improved MPG.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,561 Posts
mpg & Tires

The manufacturers pressure recommendation is based on lots of factors, one of those being a smooth ride. Higher pressures mean a slightly rougher ride.

AFAIK, the max pressure listed on the tire is the max cold inflation pressure. Of course, as the tire heats with driving, pressure wil go up.

With that said, I have been running the tires in all my cars at 34 psi (tires rated at 35 psi max) with zero problems for at least 25 years. No blowouts, no weird tire wear, no tire damage, no handling problems (including in HORRIBLE ice and snow conditions here in the upper midwest). All I notice is a slightly harsher ride and slightly sharper handling. I have never run any kind of gas mileage tests, but it makes sense that less sidwall flex at higher psi = less frictional losses in the tires = slightly improved MPG.
I agree on tire pressure. However, driving habit will make more than over pressure, and oil viscosity combined for the majority of drivers. Driving habits also effect brake wear and tire wear.

MPG is so hard to get a handle on that most of will not know. I drove many times from Columbus O. to KC, KS. I-70 boring, boring, and mega boring. All in Lincoln Cont. The show instant mpg which is worthless, and reset and check for a period, say 10 miles or so of flat cruise speed. Here is the catch. I have seen 4mpg difference on the same tank same day, same speed. Reason. WIND. Yes they have wind in those flat land states.:lol2: And the srrprise to me, side wind is at least as bad as headwind.

And the other one is tempearature. Hotter is less mpg. The A/C pulls according to how much work it is doing. Example. Evansville IN leaving place on I-164, flat as they get. Car had been sitting in August sun, mabye upper 90's. Couple of miles and onto the freeway. Set cruise on 70 and got 18 mpg for about 15 miles, never changed until the auto climate cut the fan back from max. Then I reset it and it came back to 25 mpg all the way to Cincinnati. Wintertime and flatland and I can get 29 static on the road if I do not stop. Off the freeway, couple of stops and it drops of course. I do not do that kind of driving any more so I stay at home.

I do not miss I-70, NEVER! Still do I-71 Columbus to Cin. The stretch without a town from mile 100 to mile 25. Their idea of a "hill" is an overpass. :coolgleam:

Happy mpg

-chart-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I have started to "drive as if there is an egg between my foot and the gas pedal" as Jeff suggested. I'll test the difference in mpg on this next tank(filling up later today). Then drive like that till I fill up before Sunday as I'm heading over to Lake Michigan and back. I also read another post about the difference between Drive and Overdrive. I'm going to start switching to Drive when cruising more around town and then overdrive at 50+mph and see if that helps. Thank you for all the tidbits of knowledge that are being thrown around. I'm still trying to learn about cars so every little bit helps!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
As far as I know, I get pretty good gas mileage with my taurus and everything is in working order now after some repairs(sychronizer/dpfe sensor). I was wondering if there are any mods that I can put on the car that will show a decent increase in mpg that are hopefully fairly inexpensive(less than $100). I would like to get my city up a little if possible but highway mostly as I have a 600 mile trip one way to school.
It has had a full tuneup done recently (spark plugs(iridium Autolites), Oil Change, Fuel and Air Filter).
Purchase a Scan Gauge for about $169. It will change the way you drive your car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
I wonder if switching to spare tire doughnuts all around would save gas?
yes they would, BUT you would spend so much money constantly replacing them that you would lose any money you saved in gas, and then a lot more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
Some more of the extreme:

- Remove passenger seat and remove rear seats.
- Remove spare tire and jack/tools.
- Tape up seams/fender gaps.
- Construct a belly pan for underneath the vehicle.
- Empty your washer fluid tank.
- Minimize load on your alternator, charge the battery overnight, keep radio turned off, plug nothing into the cigarette lighter, minimize use of A/C.
- Keep windows rolled up.
- Keep as little gas in the tank as possible until next fill-up.
- Remove door mirrors.
Well if you empty your washer fluid tank, you might as well remove it too, and save a couple of more MPGs:lol2: whahaha.

Drive behind a truck.
 
1 - 20 of 45 Posts
Top