Taurus Car Club of America : Ford Taurus Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,306 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Do not use anti-seize as a lubricant such as on caliper slide pins or on threads for a bushing press or any mechanical assembly that requires a lubricant. Do not use anti-seize on exposed threads because the compound can attract contaminants that may contribute to thread damage when the fastener is removed.Sep 9, 2020

6 Tips For Effective Use Of Anti-Seize Compound
blog.fcpeuro.com › 6-tips-for-effective-use-of-anti-seize


I have no opinion on this, but I used it on a door hinge pin for a heavy outside door and it is working well.
-chart-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,306 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Do not use anti-seize as a lubricant such as on caliper slide pins or on threads for a bushing press or any mechanical assembly that requires a lubricant. Do not use anti-seize on exposed threads because the compound can attract contaminants that may contribute to thread damage when the fastener is removed.Sep 9, 2020
6 Tips For Effective Use Of Anti-Seize Compound
blog.fcpeuro.com › 6-tips-for-effective-use-of-anti-seize


I have no opinion on this, but I used it on a door hinge pin for a heavy outside door and it is working well.
-chart-
if you want science and real life testing.
-chart-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
On the one hand, the article specifically says NOT to use anti-seize with spark Plugs. The next paragraph says the product SHOULD be used with dissimilar metals. It's common to find aluminum heads, spark plugs from ferrous metal. I have used just a small amount of copper A/S when changing spark plugs for 2 decades and haven't had an issue. Curious as to what is advised, OR what others practice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,206 Posts
^+1. Anti-seize on the plug threads and dielectric grease inside all boots. Also, never-seize on the rear brake guide/slide pins.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,415 Posts
Dab of antiseize on spark plugs for at least 40 years. Zero issues.
 
  • Like
Reactions: sheila

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,306 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Dab of antiseize on spark plugs for at least 40 years. Zero issues.
Key word "Dab". I prefer to put a dab on, then wipe off excess by turning the plug in a rag so as to remove excess and keep it away from the electrodes.
My most recent project was getting my snow blower ready for winter. While back mice built nests in the chain box. 4 bolts and the cover comes off. Mice P rusts things up and I had lubed up the chains with grease. That is OK. But the driven wheel, a rubber tired wheel that runs on a drive plate. It slides on a hex shaft side to side as drive speed is changed. That wheel was not sliding well on the shaft. I put copper anti-seize on the shaft and moved it back and forth. Then wiped all off I could get off with rags so it might not sling any off on the drive plate. That stuff stays on no matter the wipe. Now is slides very slick. My snow blower is ~25-30 years old and still works. Changed the oil ad aired up the tires.
-chart-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,522 Posts
Dab of antiseize on spark plugs for at least 40 years. Zero issues.
I don't use it, but by the time I started working on cars, spark plugs have had nickel plated threads for a while now, which are excellent at preventing corrosion of any kind. However, using it certainly isn't going to hurt anything. Its not like it's some special torque to yield fastener where torque is critical.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top