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With the CEL on, you really need to get the codes. Without codes, you are shooting in the dark.
 
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Discussion Starter #22
I know it be helpful to have codes read.
I cleaned plugs and it started up and ran rough for 5 min and cut off
A mechanic next door told me the injectors prob clogged up again.
I'll have to buy a code reader. I can't take car anywhere and mechanics want 40 - 75 bucks to read the codes.
 

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It isnt helpful to have the codes, it is essential to have the codes.

Since the code(s) will be P series codes (Powertrain codes) any cheapo scan tool will work. Much better option is to download Forscan (free download for PC) and pick up a ELM327 OBDII interface (around $25 on Amazon, Ebay, etc). That will allow you to read all series codes (P, C, B and U series), show hundreds of PIDs (Parameter IDs) in various formats (numerical, graphical, etc).

$40 to $75 to read the codes? Thats highway robbery!! Takes under 2 minutes to get the codes working slowly.
 

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You wrote that you 'cleaned the plugs'....how? Did you use a bead blaster or plug cleaner? If not, they're not cleaned. If you can't bead blast the plugs clean, (cleaning the entire inside of the plug to bare ceramic all the way to the bottom, etc) buy new ones.
Wire brush + spray cleaner won't do it!
 

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^^^^^^ Agree 100%
 

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You wrote that you 'cleaned the plugs'....how? Did you use a bead blaster or plug cleaner? If not, they're not cleaned. If you can't bead blast the plugs clean, (cleaning the entire inside of the plug to bare ceramic all the way to the bottom, etc) buy new ones.
Wire brush + spray cleaner won't do it!
I clean my small engine plugs as in the pic using household ammonia. I put it in a glass cup with the plug in it. Boil it in the microwave.
Back in the day, old school shops had sand blast plug cleaner and pressure testing for spark. That turned out to be a bad deal. Grans of sand got trapped in the seams and then fell out into the cylinder. Bad deal.
Ammonia is a very good cleaner but often not known. It is OLD SCHOOL. Like Me.!
-chart-
 

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I clean my small engine plugs as in the pic using household ammonia. I put it in a glass cup with the plug in it. Boil it in the microwave.
Back in the day, old school shops had sand blast plug cleaner and pressure testing for spark. That turned out to be a bad deal. Grans of sand got trapped in the seams and then fell out into the cylinder. Bad deal.
Ammonia is a very good cleaner but often not known. It is OLD SCHOOL. Like Me.!
-chart-
Nice tip! Will try that.
However, bead blasting aircraft plugs is normal procedure because the plugs are far too expensive to replace every time they get some lead or oil buildup. Of course, we then clean with spray cleaner, blast with air and clean the threads, followed by pressure testing to confirm that the plugs fire when under pressure.
As you know, plugs that seem to fire fine under ambient pressure can sometimes break down under combustion pressure. And if you have an engine with a weird misfire it's best to be sure beyond all doubt that the plugs aren't the cause, lest you go down a long, winding and expensive rabbit hole only to discover that the-plugs were the problem after all.
 

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Just replace the plugs and see what happens. New plugs arent that expensive, and relatively easy to replace assuming you have a Vulcan. If you have a Duratec, you have to pull the upper intake to get at the rear bank plugs, and it is a good idea to replace the upper to lower intake gaskets (easy and cheap).
 
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I clean my small engine plugs as in the pic using household ammonia. I put it in a glass cup with the plug in it. Boil it in the microwave.
Back in the day, old school shops had sand blast plug cleaner and pressure testing for spark. That turned out to be a bad deal. Grans of sand got trapped in the seams and then fell out into the cylinder. Bad deal.
Ammonia is a very good cleaner but often not known. It is OLD SCHOOL. Like Me.!
-chart-
I have a Duratec 24 valve. Dual can , I replaced all the coils, plugs , upper and lower intake gaskets ( good investment) I get 114 miles to a quarter tank , I also run 100% Amsoil in the Crankcase 115,000 miles on her and she operates flawless .
I suggest get a complete gasket set from Napa ,change them all
Clean everything with carb cleaner .
 

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I have now 3 '03's DOHC miles range from 122-192K. Sold '01 DOHC). Never had a gasket leak on intake. I pull the upper to replace the coil and/or plugs. Wipe the surface and replace. Never had a leak. My long term trims are 0 to -7 at idle. No sign of a leak, it ain't broke no need to fix it. If you do not have a leak, replacement is waste of time and effort. I have had plug and wire issues, both OE and aftermarket. Lin cont had a loose plug and another plug did not belong to this engine. Aftermarket Autolite with bad top electrode not making good contact. Coilpack fail is common, had that also. Cracks and misfire.
-chart-
 

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Discussion Starter #32
I havent seen plugs that nasty in a long long time. First thing I would do is replace the plugs and see if it will start / run. Maybe replace the plug wires with the correct Motorcraft replacements if they look iffy. Also remove the coil pack and inspect it for cracks. Any crack, even if small, especially on the bottom, replace the coil pack with Motorcraft or BWD only.... no cheap junk parts from the discount parts store.
 
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