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I have a 24" x 36" x 3/16" sheet of polypropylene plastic for the additional sections. I am told that 'polyester' fillers will adhere to it.
Don't know enough about the plastics used in flex bumpers and not sure if they can be "welded" to other types of plastics. I have painted flex bumpers on a 75 Firebird I had ages ago and at that time you had to a a flex additive so the paint wouldn't crack. Not sure if they have a flexible filler used especially for flex bumpers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #106 ·
It has been a while (like a good 40 years) since I last applied body filler, but its just like I remember it. You get about 3 to 4 minutes of working time (the first minute of which is spent throughly mixing the body filler with its catalyst), it drips all over the place when being placed up against vertical or inverted surfaces (and not all surfaces are nicely horizontal and flat), and it eventually gets all over your fingers.


Of course, before applying filler, I had to remove the *#%{@!+&%#% duct tape which the sandblaster admittedly had to use to protect certain surfaces from sandblast overspray. It took me a good half an hour (picking and scrapping) to get it done, but I did it.


It really is a job for professionals, and this amature spent all afternoon puting a “base” coat to all of the exposed metal, which was my only objective at this point (pictures). I believe that the best advise that I could give is to not try to apply too much at a time. It took me a number of “drips” all over my driveway before I finally came to the conclusion to keep the mixing board in my other hand underneath the area that I was applying filler (ha, ha, ha).


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I found the easiest way to work filler is to apply, let harden but not fully and use a "cheese grater" or filler rasp to remove excess. The filler you used should be thicker for the base coat then a body cream to fill small pin holes and scratches.
 

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Discussion Starter · #108 ·
Well, I am finally starting to get a feel for applying body filler again. Once I had most of the exposed surfaces covered with at least some base coat, I started shaping things. I figured that with body filler you can either shape the filler after it is set (sanding), or you can shape it as it is being set (placing it with formed tools), or as Automender12345 has suggested, it can be shapped while it is in a semi-hard condition just after setting where large quantities can be removed by ‘grating’.


I cut out part of the polyproylene plastic sheet which I will use for my bumper cover modifications to make a “mixing board” and I cut out a few pieces and shaped radii in them to use as application tools in order to apply filler to the car body to make curverd surfaces. A ‘concave’ 6” radius will help me place filler in the section at the rear of the car just below the trunk lid. And a couple of different ‘convex’ radii will help me place material under the fins. In addition, I cut out a thin section of a plastic bucket which I shaped into a strip which ‘frames’ the gas filler tube door so that I can apply filler to move its outside surface to match the body lines on the passenger side of the car (pictures).

I used the two gallons of body filler which I had purchased, and have ordered 1 more gallon to (hopefully) finish the job.


After doing a little more shaping of the filled areas, I plan to remount the plastic bumper cover, and place filler along all the adjoining surfaces in order to get a better fit when finished (I am assuming that the filler will not stick to it).


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Discussion Starter · #109 ·
Additional description of build up around gas filler door.

Note from the previous pictures that I 'built up' the gas filler tube area (up to 3/8”) in order to get good flow lines on that side of the car. As I mentioned last time in order to frame this ‘deeper section’ of body filler around and over the gas filler door, I cut a section of a plastic bucket and used body filler to secure it into the groove arond the gas filler door. Once enough body filler was in place to secure this new border to the gas filler tube, I started sanding down its profile. once I get its profile to match the desired body line in that location, I will fill the inside of it (the portion over the actual gas filler door), then sand it down to match the profile of the area around it, then, finally, remove the plactic border (approximately 1/8” wide).
 

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Discussion Starter · #110 ·
I recieved the next gallon of body filler today.

Here is a picture of some of the plastic forms I cut out for placing the body filler, and a few pictures of filling in the gas filler tube door.


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Discussion Starter · #111 ·
After adding some more filler to low spots, and sanding down the high spots, I remounted the car’s bumper cover so that I can establish a good border between the body and the bumper cover on the finished car.


I remounting the bumper cover, I pressed body filler into the gap between the car body and the bumper cover, let it harden, then I removed the bumper cover (pictures). I now have a ‘fitted’ interface between the car body and the bumper cover.



It is now time for some more ‘finish sanding and filling’.


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Discussion Starter · #112 ·
I removed the bumper cover (which did not stick) to reveal a nice line at the interface. (picture)


After this, I had to ‘hunt’ for the perimeter of the gas filler door. After sketching out a theoretical line for the perimeter of the door, I found the back end (opposite the hinge), and peeled it open. (pictures)

At this point, I can see that I have some finishing to do in order to shape the gap for the gas filler door.


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Discussion Starter · #114 ·
Seems like a lot of filler on that section, hopefully it adheres well and you can maintain a sharp edge.

Your right, it was nearly 5/8" at the bottom of the gas filler dood. It was applied to "sandblasted bare metal in layers. I hope it will work.

I have put 3 gallons of filler on the back of the car, I just ran out (that might be a good thing - as I feel that I might be 'splitting hairs' at this point in the body filling). I just placed an order (on Amazon) for a half gallon of sandable epoxy primer. I hope to use it at this point to prep the body close enough for a paint job.

I plan to brush it on thick, let it fully cure, sand down high spots, and repeat until I get an acceptable finish for finish painting.
 

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Your right, it was nearly 5/8" at the bottom of the gas filler dood. It was applied to "sandblasted bare metal in layers. I hope it will work.

I have put 3 gallons of filler on the back of the car, I just ran out (that might be a good thing - as I feel that I might be 'splitting hairs' at this point in the body filling). I just placed an order (on Amazon) for a half gallon of sandable epoxy primer. I hope to use it at this point to prep the body close enough for a paint job.

I plan to brush it on thick, let it fully cure, sand down high spots, and repeat until I get an acceptable finish for finish painting.
I have used several times, fiber glass woven cloth in the Bondo. I lay down a thin layer of putty, than overlay with cloth, then lay thin layer on top of the cloth. All done quickly. Adding that cloth makes it much stronger.
Just sharing.
-chart-
 

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Discussion Starter · #116 ·
I have used several times, fiber glass woven cloth in the Bondo. I lay down a thin layer of putty, than overlay with cloth, then lay thin layer on top of the cloth. All done quickly. Adding that cloth makes it much stronger.
Just sharing.
-chart-

I am sure that you are right, adding fiberglass woven cloth would definitely increase the strength in that section.

I am hoping that I won't have an issue as that is the only area on the car that is that thick. As it turned out the bottom end of the gas filler door was at a low point in the theoretical flow lines determined by my modifications (a "gully" if you will). Most of the body filler is under an 1/8". In fact you will see plenty of bare metal patches in the coming set of pictures.
 

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Your right, it was nearly 5/8" at the bottom of the gas filler dood. It was applied to "sandblasted bare metal in layers. I hope it will work.

I have put 3 gallons of filler on the back of the car, I just ran out (that might be a good thing - as I feel that I might be 'splitting hairs' at this point in the body filling). I just placed an order (on Amazon) for a half gallon of sandable epoxy primer. I hope to use it at this point to prep the body close enough for a paint job.

I plan to brush it on thick, let it fully cure, sand down high spots, and repeat until I get an acceptable finish for finish painting.
They also make a glazing cream which is either a supper thick primer or a cream that has a hardener for quicker setting. I have used it for eliminating small sanding swirls or pinholes in the filler. I have used spray on sandable primer to get even finish when you have bare metal and primer surfaces in an area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #118 ·
Automender12345,

Talk to me about that 'glazing cream.....

The two-part epoxy paint didn't work out anything like I was hoping. It was basically liquid (spray on consistency), while I was envisioning a brush on consistency. It is going to be very hard to sand a half-a-mill thickness (ha, ha, ha).

I am considering using some rustoleum brush on epoxy to fill pinholes and scratches (any thoughts), before using the paint that I have to finish.


Henry
 

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Automender12345,

Talk to me about that 'glazing cream.....

The two-part epoxy paint didn't work out anything like I was hoping. It was basically liquid (spray on consistency), while I was envisioning a brush on consistency. It is going to be very hard to sand a half-a-mill thickness (ha, ha, ha).

I am considering using some rustoleum brush on epoxy to fill pinholes and scratches (any thoughts), before using the paint that I have to finish.


Henry

These are the products I was talking about. One uses a hardener and I believe one is a air dry cure. It has ben a few years since I used one but it was a Bondo brand that used a hardener and a few decades since I used a lacquer based one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #120 ·
Thank you, Automender12345

It's time for a confession, before anyone out there who has used epoxy primer thinks I have went nuts regarding the thickness of the coat I received on my first pass over the body (I claimed about a half-a-mill).

It turns out, that, while I did shake the can that the epoxy resin came in, I did not effectively mix it. When I went to make another coat today, I found that all of the 'solids' in the resin can were in the bottom half of the can. I had simply poured off liquid yesterday, and mixed it with the catalyst (more liquid). In addition to this, I started applying it about 5 minutes after mixing it. Basically, I simply brushed on a bunch of liquid (no solids).

Today, after taking the time to read how to prepare the epoxy primer, I thoroughly mixed the resin can, mixed the resin and catalyst, and let it sit for an hour, remixed, and applied it. Much better results.

I prepped the surface with 120 grit (instead of the 36 grit which I had used to form the body filler), and applied the filler directly to pin hole areas first (trying to work the primer into the pinholes with my brush), then I primered other areas. I plan to lightly sand with the 120 grit tomorrow, and if pinholes appear again (and the internet tells me they will), I plan to try to force the primer into pinholes and other imperfections with a razor blade.

With a half gallon of primer, at the rate I am going I should get many coats.


More to follow.....
 
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