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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay I have scuffed the outside of the headlights and this still wont go away, maybe it is moisture in the headlight itself?

 

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^ 3M headlight lens restoration kit. Available at wallyworld or parts stores for about $20.
Works great, but I think that's on the inside of his headlamp, if I read his post right.
 

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The 3M headlight restoration kit is a waste of time and money. Anyone who recommends it to anyone else cannot be considered either knowledgeable or a friend.

For less that the cost of the kit, you can go get yourself several grades of fine grained wet/dry sandpaper, I recommend 400, 800, 1000, 1500, and 2000 grit, some lint free cotton or microfiber cloths, and then spend some of the money you saved on a UV blocking clearcoat made for headlights. That is the only way you will get a good looking and lasting headlight restoration. All those worthless kits do is remove whatever protection your lens had and call it good, that would be like repainting your car by sanding down the finish and going over it with some cheap spray paint without putting on a new clearcoat. It will look really good till the sun starts to cook it. You have to follow through and do the whole thing, otherwise you are just wasting your time and money.

That being said, if that is inside the headlight, there is little you can do about that. If it is inside, you will probably have to either live with it, or replace the housing. From the looks of it, it doesn't look that bad. The one area looks like it might be in a part of the lens that doesn't show on the car anyway, as for the rest, it just needs a good polishing with wet sanding. The denatured alcohol is used to clean the lens and prep it for the clearcoat, and to give you a preview of what the sealed lens will look like.

The headlights on my Taurus I polished up last year still look like brand new lenses a year later, and will probably continue to do so for years. I tried the cheaper kits before on other cars, the results did not last one season.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well i recently buffed my headlights and it indeed got rid of that strip there. but they are still foggy.. i went to town on them for a while and still they are cloudy, i was hoping theyd be crystal clear as to show the centennial headlight mod i did to them but when theyre cloudy it is barely even noticable
 

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The 3M headlight restoration kit is a waste of time and money. Anyone who recommends it to anyone else cannot be considered either knowledgeable or a friend.
True, to a point.

The 3M kit does work well to remove defects if you take the time to keep wiping off the residue as you go so as not to clog the sanding pad or mar the surface of your lens.

You can do a better job with sandpaper and good-ol' elbow grease, but most people are impatient. (Which is where 3m makes their money.)

For best results and longevity, you should still apply a coat of good-quality wax to the lenses when you are done. (Whichever method you use/prefer.)
 

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The 3M kit has worked well for me in the past. Its held up good for 2-3 yrs. on 4-5 gen 3s. If youre worried about uv protection, slap on some wax with uv protectorant as mentioned above. Or apply some Blue Coral, etc. uv protectorant. I guess if they get too bad in the future, ill run to the self service salvage yard and get replacements for a few bucks.
 

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These pics are from 2009 when I first refinished my headlights. I used the sandpaper method and on the final run used a fine polishing compound to buff the plastic.

Step 1 (Before)


And during (each photo is the next step)




 

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The 3M headlight restoration kit is a waste of time and money. Anyone who recommends it to anyone else cannot be considered either knowledgeable or a friend.
Quit being such a douchebag. You are not god. You are not the almighty power that is always right either. Many of us are tired of your attitude.
 

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Quit being such a douchebag. You are not god. You are not the almighty power that is always right either. Many of us are tired of your attitude.
Sorry, don't mean to come across that way, I'm just saying I'm not just making this up, I've been down that road before. I've wasted my time and money restoring my headlights, then they faded very quickly, and so I did it again, and after the second time they faded, not matter what I tired, they remained foggy.

There was an outfit called Rebright, I tried them on three of my vehicles, and all three are crystal clear to this day. They did not fade again, or turn yellow or dull. They still look almost new even after a couple years.

Rebright doesn't seem to be in business anymore, but the only thing that made their kit special was the clearcoat, which you can get by itself elsewhere.
 

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I would use Lamin-X on the headlights after you buff them out and clearcoat them - your headlights will be truely protected, I might do this with mine.....

Lamin-x
 

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My 2001 headlights suffered from water ingress and I replaced them with Knock off Eagle Eye headlights from Asia. I should try using Toothpaste to try and restore the OEM lights. No problems with Eagle Eye assemblies, good fit and half the price!
 

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Whether you use toothpaste, or whatever, the problem is not getting them polished, it is really about protecting the polycarbon from getting further damaged. I don't see that waxes will really help much, maybe they do. All I know that my Taurus was done with the ReBright stuff over a year ago, and they still look like they were polished yesterday, no waxes or anything.
 
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