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Discussion Starter · #1 ·


That's with slightly heavy driving.

Note: I've installed an aux cooler too. That just seems high to me. It's got a proper fluid level and I've checked the cooler lines for kinks. Opinions?

AX4N
 

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Its not unusual for the transmission to be close in temp to the engine considering that they are bolted together and the heat exchanger is in the radiator covered in coolant. I would be worried if things were getting up above 240. If the transmission was getting too hot, a transmission over-temp code would also be set in the PCM. This is only true for vehicles with a transmission temperature sensor (like the 4r70w).
 

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What kind of driving are you doing? What's the ambient temp? What kind of trans fluid are you using?
 

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If ambient temp is warm (and from your location I would guess it is 70s to low 80s), and driving was either stop and go city or over the speed limit interstate, that temp seems reasonable.

Where is the gauge sender located? Is that the hottest you have seen it?
 

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i donk know but for some reason it seems a little high to me, i mean if i just put a guage in my car and it said 200*. I would do research on it and check just like you are doin but as of now i think its a little high with a cooler on it. im sure theres someone on here that knows more than me, (due to me being new to ford cars in general). i usually deal with ford trucks and chevy cars but i have a ford now so im learning its limits and extremes too.
 

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Trans temps vairy alot based on ambient temp and driving style and conditions. The location of the sender also has a significant effect. Sensor in the cooling line out of the tranny will read higher than sensor in the pan often by 10 to 20 deg, as coolng line out to cooler has the hottest fluid. 180 to 190 deg for fluid temp isnt too hot, especially for Mercon V semi synthetic fluid. 220 is pushing it (i.e., reducing usable life of the fluid) and 260+ is WAY too hot.
 

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I have always used this as a general guide, your doing good ! :)
 

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Since this is an interesting topic with good actual data from the OP:

As another data point on a different trans cooler set-up:
I have a 3.0L Vulcan with the AX4S trans...1993. I have a trans temp gauge installed in the trans oil line coming from my auxillary cooler and back into the transmission. I do not run the trans oil line through the radiator....so the radiator cooler is totally bypassed. My auxillary cooler is in front of my A/C condenser. The auxillary cooler is a plate design rated about 19,000 GVW.

After 20 minutes of in city driving at 50 degrees ambient I see around 130-150 degrees. The most I have seen is after 45 minutes of freeway driving and then with 10 minutes of city driving about 155-160 degrees.....thats with about 55 degrees ambient. Still waiting for warmer summer weather to see what temps I get. Fluid is Mercon V. Oil temp reaches about 100 after about 5 minutes of city driving.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
What kind of driving are you doing? What's the ambient temp? What kind of trans fluid are you using?
City driving, lightly aggressive takeoffs. 63-68 degrees f and I'm using Penzoil Mercon V

Temp sender is installed into the location described in the wiki here
http://www.taurusclub.com/wiki/index.php/Transmission_Temperature_Gauge_Install




I have always used this as a general guide, your doing good ! :)

Well, I'm at 104,000 almost exactly now on the stock transmission. Still runs good, though it will shift a little hard if it's cold. But hey, it's a price I pay.
 

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Bypass the in-Radiator cooler.
Problem Solved. I could literally overheat my transmission by idling the car in the driveway on a hot day.
 

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I have the same gauge, and that is within the normal range for in-city and highway driving in warm temperatures.

I have almost never seen it go over 210, and I also have a trans cooler.
 

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The Real question is how big does the cooler (AUX) have to be to completely bypass the radiator ? I'm going to be doing the Temp gauge and the Cooler bypass and this would be good info to have if anyone has it :)
 

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How much cooler could the fluid be if using the tube cooler + radiator cooler + AUX cooler configuration?

If you ask me you could be on the border line temperature wise. If you were pulling a light trailer or going up mountains you could be well within 280F+ degrees. If the fluid gets to 280F+ how long does it have to stay there before it begins some real damage? If O-rings and seals begin breaking down at these temperatures it won't be long before the tranny begins leaking.

You may want to include the radiator cooler, tube cooler or both for reserve cooling.

Monsoon
 

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Since this is an interesting topic with good actual data from the OP:

As another data point on a different trans cooler set-up:
I have a 3.0L Vulcan with the AX4S trans...1993. I have a trans temp gauge installed in the trans oil line coming from my auxillary cooler and back into the transmission. I do not run the trans oil line through the radiator....so the radiator cooler is totally bypassed. My auxillary cooler is in front of my A/C condenser. The auxillary cooler is a plate design rated about 19,000 GVW.

After 20 minutes of in city driving at 50 degrees ambient I see around 130-150 degrees. The most I have seen is after 45 minutes of freeway driving and then with 10 minutes of city driving about 155-160 degrees.....thats with about 55 degrees ambient. Still waiting for warmer summer weather to see what temps I get. Fluid is Mercon V. Oil temp reaches about 100 after about 5 minutes of city driving.

As stated in my post above I am using the B&M cooler #70268 Rated to 19,000 lbs GVW (gross vehicle weight) and bypassing the radiator cooler.

On my other 94 sable 3.8L, I am using B&M cooler part #70264 rated to 24,000 lbs GVW. On the Sable, I am also bypassing the radiator cooler.

I am sure other types of coolers work too.....the B&M plate types are much more durable than the standard cheaper tube and fin (flimsy aluminum fins) type coolers.

Other brands sell the plate types so there are lots to choose from. I bought the B&Ms from Summit racing.
 

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With my bypassed radiator cooler, the stock finned cooler + B&M70628, my trans never goes over 150 unless I'm racing or driving it reallllllllly hard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
With my bypassed radiator cooler, the stock finned cooler + B&M70628, my trans never goes over 150 unless I'm racing or driving it reallllllllly hard.
My coolant line never even runs into the radiator.. It's just got the stock finned tube. From there I run it into the aux cooler.
 

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If your running a good stacked plate type aux cooler, you should bypass the radiator atf cooler, as running both can reduce the flow of atf. Also, most trans run cooler with full synthetic atf, such as Mobil1. The weak trans Ford used in these cars also shift better with full synthetic atf.
 

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If your running a good stacked plate type aux cooler, you should bypass the radiator atf cooler, as running both can reduce the flow of atf. Also, most trans run cooler with full synthetic atf, such as Mobil1. The weak trans Ford used in these cars also shift better with full synthetic atf.
Yes and No. Mostly no. It depends on the cooler and plumbing. I always recommend a good half inch ID so you don't have to worry about reduction in flow. And you always want smooth bends with the plumbing for the same reason.

Monsoon
 
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