Taurus Car Club of America : Ford Taurus Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I suspect the lousy smell from tailpipe and somewhat rough idle may be due to bad O2 sensor. I've seen O2 spray cleaner for sale; has anybody out there used it?

Are there any useful instructions on how to get to them (it?) to perform this? I reckon that I can 'borrow' the special socket from the auto parts store.

TX!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,425 Posts
The only usefull instruction is to use new sensors. Sensor gets microscopic metallic particles embedded in the porous ceramic and nothing can dislodge those.
Sensors on Amazon are not that expensive. I would replace the upstream ones.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,732 Posts
^^^^^ +1

Just replace the sensor(s) if they are dead or slow response.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Ditton, there's no way to bring an 02 sensor back from the dead. Cleaning is a waste of time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
spraying chemicals onto the o2 sensor can actually contaminate the material and render it more useless. Just replace it..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,071 Posts
I tried to clean the ones on my old 93 by putting them in a ultrasonic cleaner
with solvent. Did not seem to hurt them any. Not sure how much it helped either. I scraped the crud off the outside of them before i did it.
If your were already going to replace them, you got nothing to lose trying it
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,537 Posts
Some people have reported success by using a blow torch on them. The idea is that the blow torch will burn off any contaminants (mainly carbon) that have accumulated, especially if the car is running rich or has an oil or coolant leak and the exhaust never gets really hot. This is dicey though, because you can easily damage the sensor if you get it too hot. As soon as you see the sensor tip start to glow deep red (about 1200°F), take the torch off. If the sensor is caked with carbon, you can dip it into water once you've heated it to "steam clean" the deposits off. Hit it with compressed air and repeat. You can do this a half dozen times while turning the sensor, but I would only do the water dip if you have carbon caked on. If you just see metal, the water dip will subject the sensor to too much thermal shock and it might crack. You could probably do the same thing by going out and running your car at WOT for a few minutes (see Italian tuneup). If you have to buy a new sensor anyway it might not hurt to try. Just don't touch the end with your fingers once it's clean.

How to Clean Automotive O2 Sensors | eHow.com
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
I had a 'o' sensor problem last year on my 1993, car stalled often and check engine light came on. My mechanic cleaned it, no problem since.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top