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While it may sound like science fiction to some, being car hacked might just be one of the first high-tech crimes to hit the expressway, reports Discover Magazine. A wireless connection and some hardware and software knowledge can enable an experienced hacker to have their way with your car's computer systems. This means they can activate or deactivate lights, brakes, the accelerator and – within the most extreme cases – even directional control of the vehicle. Needless to say, the mayhem of such car hacking could create dangerous situations.

Source for this article: Can a vehicle’s computer system be remotely car hacked

Consider the nightmare of being car hacked

Imagine what it might feel like to be car hacked.

Let's say you're stuck on a gridlocked expressway in your brand new smart car that was purchased with a honey of an automobile loan. A hacker sits on a nearby hillside with his Wi-Fi connected laptop or mobile device. He zeroes in on your car's computer system and forces you to accelerate to the car in front of you. That's one more universe from the mechanical issues like sticky gas pedal, and software engineer Stefan Savage says that this could start happening very soon. A modern vehicle's electronic control unit (ECU) controls many different functions throughout a car. According to BBC News, approximately 100 megabytes of code are spread across those ECUs. As Discovery Magazine reports, that gives hackers numerous points of entry.

Savage has his own CarShark

Savage's CarShark software demonstrated just how easy it could be to remotely gain access to car functions. Systems like Electronic Stability Control and Active Cruise Control are central points within the electronic central nervous system of a car, as brakes, wheels, acceleration and parallel parking aids all stem from the function of those two hubs. Hackers can flood those systems with dummy packets of data and lock them down, opening the way to send their own commands independent of the driver. It's not a simple process that any dime-store hack could accomplish, but a sophisticated hacker could. Hackers will always search for new methods to cause mischief if they're sufficiently motivated, but it is clear that automakers must take action to secure car computer systems. They will continue to pursue car hacking or any other means of bleeding-edge public transportation that operates on a computer network, like "road trains".

Car hacking isn't all death and destruction

Stefan Savage's work is focusing on thwarting the darker sign of car hacking, but there are somewhat less dangerous ways the exploit is used. Wired writes of an Austin, Texas car dealer who used car hacking to harass dead beat customers. Firing the horns and lights were the dealer's little way of making dead beats take notice. One employee of said Austin dealership was even fired when he made the cars of about 100 customers inoperable. This got the employee fired, but it should also serve as a warning to car makers that car hacking must be addressed.

More data on this topic

Discover Magazine

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/80beats/...-of-the-future/

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/80beats/...take-the-wheel/
 

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a 97 Taurus doesn't have a 3.2L Yamaha V6 You conspiracy theorist. These cars don't have wireless systems and connectivity like that is a good ways off.....go troll elsewhere.
 

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Methinks that this user profile is for Discover Magazine's very own paid spammer.


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