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Discussion Starter #1
I've got a bad inner tie rod on the driver's side. I'm thinking this is going to be a pain to do, but I can't find the procedure in Chilton's. Anyone have experience with this?
Thanks!
 

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Yep... it's not hard. You just need to get the right tool(s). What year?
 

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Well, you're going to have to remove the wheel, then pop the tie rod out of the spindle. You will also have to remove the outer tie rod end, either now or later. Now will give you the ability to remove the boot completely. Of course, I haven't replaced one on a Taurus so it could be a little different.

I don't know about lowering the sub-frame and all of that. I know changing the inner on my 89' Escort was a pain in the noots. It had a little rivit in it that kept it from spinning that was almost impossible to get out because it was on the top. There is also nothing to grab on to on the rack to keep the rack from twisting. Can't grab it with pliers because it will screw up the surface and chew up the seal.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
yes, the rivet in the boot has me concerned about how to attack it. Should I remove the entire boot? I'm also curious as to what type of joint is in there and what corresponding tools I will need to get it apart.
 

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I wasn't referring to a rivit in the boot, it was a rivit in the tie rod where it screws onto the rack. The boot on my Escort just had a normal hose clamp on it. This may sound confusing unless you see it for yourself. I believe I worked on a Bonneville that had the same system.

The joint is most likely a screw on type. (The inner tie rod screws onto the rack). I'm sure the guys that have done it will chime in today to confim this. You have to keep the rack stable because the twisting can mess it up.
 

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It's really not that hard. You need to pull the wheel, and lower the rear part of the subframe so you can actually get tools back where the rack is. It took me 2.5hrs to do outer and inner tie rod ends on both sides. On my car, you need a special crow's foot tie rod tool, since the ball-and-socket joint is actually larger than the wrench flats. Once you look at the inner tie rod end, you'll see what I mean.

Instructions from SHOTimes
 

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Would the inner tie rod be 'tied' to shaking in the steering wheel at load around 45 to 47 mph? 94 Taurus wagon, 130k, 6% grade makes my wagon shake. Replaced two motor mounts and I still feel it.
 

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Originally posted by sundarpn@May 23 2004, 11:34 AM
how much would a shop charge for changing inner tie rods?
That's one you'll have to shop around for. I had one shop quote me $550 for both inner tie rods. They said they'd have to drop the rack to do it, and then of course there is alignment afterward. They looked at me like I was crazy when I brought it back in a week later and said I did it myself in under 3 hours. :freak2:

Utahtaurus Posted on May 23 2004, 11:16 AM
  Would the inner tie rod be 'tied' to shaking in the steering wheel at load around 45 to 47 mph? 94 Taurus wagon, 130k, 6% grade makes my wagon shake. Replaced two motor mounts and I still feel it. 
...could be. The tie rod is an essential part of your steering linkage. Check the inside edge of both of the front tires for uneven wear. When the inner tie rod's ball-and-socket joint gets worn, it allows the wheel to steer back and forth a degree or two while you are driving straight. That could be the vibration you are feeling. A good test for tie rod wear is to jack the car up on one side, and grab the wheel at 3 o'clock and 9 o'clock, and try to steer the wheel back and forth. Now try to do the same thing while holding the wheel at 6 and 12. If you feel any play while checking it at 3 and 9, but NO play at 6 and 12, it could be an inner or outer tie rod end. If you feel play in the wheel at all four locations, it's probably a bad hub or wheel bearing. Check both front wheels. This is actually the method most mechanics use when they are doing a safety inspection on the car.

You should also rotate your wheels and tires front to back, back to front. If the vibration moves to under the seat, and disappears from the steering wheel, you just need to balance your wheels. If it stays up front, there is some other problem.
 
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