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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Has anyone used the loaner tool from advance auto parts? I have only seem the autozone tool referenced and I'm not sure if this kit would also require the "special Ford Taurus" adapter. It looks pretty beefy and as though it has many adapters.
Here it is on amazon:
Amazon.com: Alltrade 648617 Kit 46 Ball Joint and U-joint Service Tool Set: Industrial & Scientific

My car is a 1996 Ford Taurus 3.0 Vulcan Vin "U", AX4N. 205,xxx

Also, I don't see it mentioned in the wiki, if anyone knows a good walk through that's always helpful. The only noteworthy things I could see with removal is that:
1.) it seems the old joint doesn't have room to get out through the top. I think I would just pop the joint above it out if that's the problem.
2.) The Moogs seem to go in tight so I will put it in the freezer.

Other than that, it looks straight forward, but I'm sure i'll be back soon when it's not.
 

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1. The linked tool is what I loaned from Advance Auto Parts. The loaner from autozone has less parts. I had to return it to autozone and get loaner from advance auto parts.
2. I didn't remove the knuckle when I did ball joint.
3. Do whatever to make the job less painful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
1. The linked tool is what I loaned from Advance Auto Parts. The loaner from autozone has less parts. I had to return it to autozone and get loaner from advance auto parts.
2. I didn't remove the knuckle when I did ball joint.
3. Do whatever to make the job less painful.
Do you happen to remember which of the adapters you used? Or will it be obvious when I get to that point? Starting the job now. I have the kit and 2 brand new moogs.
 

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I reently replaced mine on my 99 and recorded a How-to video and uploaded it to my YouTube Channel.
Here is the link, I think it may help you:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I am trying to use the tool with a 2" inner diameter and 2 1/4" outer diameter on the receiving tube. It is also 2" in length. The tool is very awkward to handle and makes me curse a lot. I have the handle screwing through the strut hole and with the receiving and installing adapter it seems too long and misaligned to work correctly.

What I want to know is, will this matter for removal? Does it need to come out evenly? I KNOW it needs to be even upon installation but I assume it must be pretty square when it comes out so it doesn't get crooked during removal. Anyone?
 

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It's not as critical to have everything lined up on the removal, as far as the ball joint pushing out. Lining everything up good will however make it so it requires less pressure on the pressing tool.

The adapter we used for my sister's '98 was only for the installation part.
It was a 'socket' that fit over the new ball joint stud. It was at least 3" long, IIRC.

edit: Be sure to put some oil on the threads of the ball joint pressing tool. It will ease the operating stress on it, and yourself. Drain oil works fine.
 

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:werd: Great video. I cannot wait for the day to have air tools & a garage...that looks like it makes life much easier.
 

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Nice video. Would have liked to see you get the balljoint out of the lower control arm. Thats the hardest part.
Agreed, I had to stand on a breaker bar that went through the hole in the lower arm while an assistant guided the ball joint stud out. Ford could have given it a little more travel.:angry: I was able to do this job by just disconnecting the ball joint from the control arm and pulling the axle out of the hub. If you turn the steering wheel so the tie rod is fully extended on that side there's lots of movement available.
 

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Nice video. I also saw the one about the VSS. You should make a video about how you made that video. What type of camera are you using and what software did you use for the comments.
 

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I had to replace a ball joint on my '06 and I just used my 4 pound New England drilling hammer for removal and installation. Popped out, popped in, no damage and it's been good for 20,000 miles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Well I just smashed it with a mini sledge and it came out. Of course it put a couple nicks in the knuckle, but what can you do? The tool just doesn't look like it will fit for this application. I may try and use some of the adapter sleeves and a regular c-clamp or some set-up like that (for the install). There is no way it will press in evenly, not following the instructions anyway.
The pickle fork tore the steering knuckle( tie rod) boot. The outside caliper slid of the main caliper why I was banging on the lower ball joint threads. The pads fell out and one hit me in the face. When I put the puller on the axle it split the wheel bearing/stud assembly apart, which I was really glad to see since I just replaced it. Anyway, I have it out and I know what to expect for the driver side. All of this stuff seems pretty funny to me now, but had me pretty pissed off before. Guess my skills are as rusty as my car. :lol2:

I just hit the bearing with a mini sledge with a 2x4 in front of it to "re-seat" it. Seems to be tight in the hub now. Anyone think I should replace it anyway?
 

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I am trying to use the tool with a 2" inner diameter and 2 1/4" outer diameter on the receiving tube. It is also 2" in length. The tool is very awkward to handle and makes me curse a lot. I have the handle screwing through the strut hole and with the receiving and installing adapter it seems too long and misaligned to work correctly.

What I want to know is, will this matter for removal? Does it need to come out evenly? I KNOW it needs to be even upon installation but I assume it must be pretty square when it comes out so it doesn't get crooked during removal. Anyone?
As you seen in my video, I didn't have the right size either but the collar that pushes on the ball joint to press it out is more important that the other end. Even if the cup were a better fit, the awkward angle in how you assemble the press still only gets it semi-squared up. Slow and steady is the rule, if it doesn't feel right, then stop right away and make subtle adjustments.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Well I just took the moog out of the freezer and lubed it up. I had the Ball joint hole pre-greased as I wanted to do everything I could before taking the joint out of the freezer. I just want to tell anyone that is wondering that this kit is not usable for third generation taurii. The end that is supposed to force the joint in will only get snagged on two of the three wheel bearing bolts. Even if they are removed it will not work. It will appear to work, but if you aren't paying attention it will just be cutting into your nice soft aluminum. The c-clamp part is definitely usable though. I would just use a large socket on the "contact" side. The one I used (socket) on the first side was too small and left a ring impression in the new joint. Try and use the collars if you like, but you will see what I mean. Driver side next!
 

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I guess I'm a weirdo for just banging the ball joint out with a hammer and socket. It didn't take that long either. I used a 5 lb mini sledge and made damn sure I smacked the **** out of it. Those are Chinese made ball joints so what do you expect? If you paid less than 50 bucks for it, it won't last long. I figured that out when I bought a cheap one and had the same problem you did.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I paid 60 bucks a piece for the moogs. I have no idea if the old ones were chinese junk or the originals, neither would surprise me. All I know is they were horrendous.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I guess I'm a weirdo for just banging the ball joint out with a hammer and socket. It didn't take that long either. I used a 5 lb mini sledge and made damn sure I smacked the **** out of it. Those are Chinese made ball joints so what do you expect? If you paid less than 50 bucks for it, it won't last long. I figured that out when I bought a cheap one and had the same problem you did.

That's not weird, this is a big time mini- sledge job! Was for me anyway. I'm sure that fair weather guys don't have to deal with frozen joints and broken bolts. I should not say the tool was useless for this job, but it's not usable in the capacity it was designed. By this I mean that the c-clamp with a turnable bolt is useful. All the other parts are pretty useless. I spent way too much time reading the instructions. The most time consuming part on the driver side was the strut pinch bolt. I mini sledged the hell out of it and pb blasted it . It finally budged after a big swing that also nicked my fender.
I almost don't want to mention this, but when I put everything back together and put the cotter pin through the ball joint, I noticed grease leaking from the joint. Not seeping from top or bottom either, it was coming from between one of the folds. Would there be tiny holes to relieve pressure in the sleeve? Nope, that even sounds stupid to write. Should I warranty this or wait for it to go again? I feel like the parts store will act like I'm in the wrong, like I did something wrong during installation.
 

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Cool video Iwaters, but you did WAY more work than I did to get the balljoints replaced.

Here's what I did on a '99 Sable. It went pretty smoothly. It helps when using the PROPER Autozone loaner tools which allows removal/installation of the balljoints WITHOUT having to remove the tie rods, the brake calipers or rotors, nor the strut/knuckle assembly from the car! Wow, huh!
The tools needed include:
pitman arm puller #27016

the balljoint press kit #27023

the Ford adapter kit #27163

an axle flange puller #2737 to push the cv axle out of the hub

and a 30 mm socket #27053 to remove the cv axle nut

You'll also need a snap ring removal pliers to get the snap ring off the old balljoint and onto the new one once it's pressed onto the knuckle.

The steps went like this:
-Jack up car high enough so that you can get the balljoint press underneath the balljoint, maybe 16" high?
-Remove front tires
-Loosen front cv nuts w/ the 30 mm socket; I kept the rotor from turning by inserting a screwdriver into the rotor's cooling slot and let it pin against the caliper
-Use the axle flange puller to push cv axle in far enough so that can it be pushed further out by hand and fits loosely inside the hub
-After removing the balljoint nut, use the pitman arm puller to pop the balljoint out of lower arms, I had to use a 3lb. hammer to get one of them to pop out in addition to the pitman arm puller's tug against the balljoint, then I used a large pry bar to push down against the lower arm to get the balljoint stud out of the hole in the lower arm
-loosen upper strut mount nuts just enough to allow you to maneuver the strut/knuckle assembly far enough away so that you can push the cv axle out of the knuckle, then you can rest the cv axle onto the top of the strut/knuckle assembly, just don't stress that cv axle, be gentle w/ it!
-remove the snap ring off the balljoint using your snap ring removal pliers
-then using the balljoint "c-clamp" press and the Ford adapter kit, begin to remove the old balljoint. From the Ford adapter kit, use the large cup to cover over and around the top of the balljoint against the knuckle portion w/o touching the balljoint, and with the short adapter, one end goes on the bottom stud of the balljoint and the other end of it goes into the balljoint press's non-hex end. You'll need a 7/8" wrench to turn the balljoint press's hex end. You'll need to keep everything together & inline so that it works properly to push out the balljoint.
-Press in the new balljoint by using the long adapter, one end of it goes against the press's non-hex end and the other end of it against the knuckle surrounding the balljoint's threaded stud w/o touching the stud or possibly interfering w/ the balljoint as it's pressed into the knuckle. Place the top of the balljoint press straight onto the top of the balljoint and then press it in by turning the hex end. Again keep everything inline and together so that the balljoint goes in smoothly.
-install the new snap ring onto the balljoint
-install the cv axle back into the hub
-then tighten the upper strut nuts which then raises the strut/knuckle into position so that you can get the balljoint back into the lower arm (use the pry bar to press down far enough on the control arm to aid in getting the balljoint stud into the control arm)
-you may find out that when installing the nut onto the new balljoint, the balljoint stud turns with the nut. To avoid this problem I used an open end wrench placed around the balljoint's stud and then tightened the nut against the wrench which pulled the balljoint into the knuckle enough so that it wouldn't turn with the nut. Then remove the wrench and then the nut should go on fine w/o the stud turning w/ it.
-the rest is pretty straightforward, installation is reverse of removal as they say, :lol2: .
Torque specs:
CV axle nut: ~200 ft lbs.
Strut mount nuts: ~25 ft lbs.
Balljoint nut: ~68 ft lbs.
Lug nuts: 105 ft lbs max
 
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